Department Q7

Author: Jussi Adler-Olsen

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781784295967

Category: Cold cases (Criminal investigation)

Page: 480

View: 3651

DOWNLOAD NOW »

A NO. 1 INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER OVER 18 MILLION COPIES SOLD WINNER OF THE GLASS KEY AWARD Jussi Adler-Olsen returns with his most captivating and suspenseful novel yet. In a Copenhagen park the body of an elderly woman is discovered. Though the case bears a striking resemblance to another unsolved homicide from over a decade ago, the police cannot find any connection between the two victims. Across town a group of young women are being hunted down. The attacks seem random, but could these brutal acts of violence be related? Detective Carl M�rck of Department Q is charged with solving the mystery. Back at headquarters, Carl and his team are under pressure to deliver results: failure to meet his superiors' expectations will mean the end of Department Q. Solving the case, however, is not their only concern. After a breakdown, their colleague Rose is struggling to deal with the ghosts of her past - a past seemingly connected to one of the division's most sinister case-files. It is up to Carl, Assad and Gordon to unearth the dark and violent truth plaguing Rose before it is too late. Translated by William Frost Perfect for fans of Stieg Larsson and Jo Nesbo.

Spoken and Written Language

Relations Between Latin and the Vernacular Languages in the Earlier Middles Ages

Author: Mary Garrison,A. P. Orbán,Marco Mostert

Publisher: Brepols Pub

ISBN: 9782503507705

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 5272

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The linguistic situation of medieval Europe has sometimes been characterized as one of diglossia: one learned language, Latin, was used for religion, law, and documents, while the various vernaculars were used in other linguistic registers. Informing the relationship between Latin and the vernaculars was the choice of Latin as the language of the Western Roman Empire and the Roman Church. This choice entailed the possibility of a shared literary culture and heritage across Europe, but also had consequences for access to that heritage. Scholarship on the Romance languages has contested the relevance of the term diglossia, and the divergence between written or spoken Latin and Romance is a subject of energetic debate. In other linguistic areas, too, questions have been voiced. How can one characterize the interaction between Latin and the various vernaculars, and between the various vernaculars themselves? To what extent could speakers from separate linguistic worlds communicate? These questions are fundamental for anyone concerned with communication, the transmission of learning, literary history, and cultural interaction in the Middle Ages. This volume contains contributions by historians, cultural historians, and students of texts, language, and linguistics, addressing the subject from their various perspectives but at the same time trying to overcome familiar disciplinary divisions.