American Constitutional Law

Essays, Cases, and Comparative Notes

Author: Donald P. Kommers,John E. Finn,Gary J. Jacobsohn

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 0742599833

Category: Law

Page: 350

View: 2628

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American Constitutional Law: Essays, Cases, and Comparative Notes is a unique casebook that encourages citizens and students of the Constitution to think critically about the fundamental principles and policies of the American constitutional order. In addition to its distinguished authorship, the book has two prominent features that set it apart from other books in the field: an emphasis on the social, political, and moral theory that provides meaning to constitutional law and interpretation, and a comparative perspective that situates the American experience within a world context that serves as an invaluable prism through which to illuminate the special features of our own constitutional order. While the focus of the book is entirely on American constitutional law, the book asks students to consider what, if anything, is unique in American constitutional life and what we share with other constitutional democracies. Each chapter is preceded by an introductory essay that highlights these major themes and also situates the cases in their proper historical and political contexts. This new edition offers updated and expanded treatment of a number of important and timely topics, including gerrymandering and campaign finance, the death penalty, privacy, affirmative action, and school segregation. The new edition offers: _ Updated and expanded treatment of key cases on gerrymandering and campaign finance _ Expanded discussion of the Court's work federalism and the commerce clause _ Discussions of the Court's new cases on the death penalty, including a discussion of the controversy within the Court about the propriety of citing foreign case law _ An expanded discussion of the Court's recent work in the area of privacy, including the Court's decisions with regard to partial birth abortions and same sex marriages _ An expanded section on the Court's continuing efforts to develop a coherent takings clause jurisprudence _ Full coverage of new developments and cases concerning affirmative action and school desegregation

The Alchemists

Questioning our Faith in Courts as Democracy-Builders

Author: Tom Gerald Daly

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108285031

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 8360

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Can courts really build democracy in a state emerging from authoritarian rule? This book presents a searching critique of the contemporary global model of democracy-building for post-authoritarian states, arguing that it places excessive reliance on courts. Since 1945, both constitutional courts and international human rights courts have been increasingly perceived as alchemists, capable of transmuting the base materials of a nascent democracy into the gold of a functioning democratic system. By charting the development of this model, and critically analysing the evidence and claims for courts as democracy-builders, this book argues that the decades-long trend toward ever greater reliance on courts is based as much on faith as fact, and can often be counter-productive. Offering a sustained corrective to unrealistic perceptions of courts as democracy-builders, the book points the way toward a much needed rethinking of democracy-building models and a re-evaluation of how we employ courts in this role.

Interpreting Constitutions

A Comparative Study

Author: Jeffrey Goldsworthy

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191021660

Category: Law

Page: 384

View: 3425

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This book describes the constitutions of six major federations and how they have been interpreted by their highest courts, compares the interpretive methods and underlying principles that have guided the courts, and explores the reasons for major differences between these methods and principles. Among the interpretive methods discussed are textualism, purposivism, structuralism and originalism. Each of the six federations is the subject of a separate chapter written by a leading authority in the field: Jeffrey Goldsworthy (Australia), Peter Hogg (Canada), Donald Kommers (Germany), S.P. Sathe (India), Heinz Klug (South Africa), and Mark Tushnet (United States). Each chapter describes not only the interpretive methodology currently used by the courts, but the evolution of that methodology since the constitution was first enacted. The book also includes a concluding chapter which compares these methodologies, and attempts to explain variations by reference to different social, historical, institutional and political circumstances.

Constitutional Law and the Criminal Justice System

Author: J. Scott Harr,Kären M. Hess

Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing Company

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 405

View: 6650

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With Harr and Hess's "legalese-free" text, you'll gain a firm understanding of our often-complex Constitution and criminal justice system. To ground you in the laws that shape the system and our society, the authors present you with a clearly organized, 'bird's-eye" view of the topic, supported by over 200 summarized cases that introduce you to the most influential and pertinent cases. Harr and Hess also devote considerable time to an exploration of the Fourth and Fifth Amendments, relevant because of their

Essays in the History of Canadian Law

Quebec and the Canadas

Author: George Blaine Baker,Donald Fyson

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442670061

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 2448

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The essays in this volume deal with the legal history of the Province of Quebec, Upper and Lower Canada, and the Province of Canada between the British conquest of 1759 and confederation of the British North America colonies in 1867. The backbone of the modern Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec, this geographic area was unified politically for more than half of the period under consideration. As such, four of the papers are set in the geographic cradle of modern Quebec, four treat nineteenth-century Ontario, and the remaining four deal with the St. Lawrence and Great Lakes watershed as a whole. The authors come from disciplines as diverse as history, socio-legal studies, women’s studies, and law. The majority make substantial use of second-language sources in their essays, which shade into intellectual history, social and family history, regulatory history, and political history.

Religious Actors and International Law

Author: Ioana Cismas

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 019102189X

Category: Law

Page: 440

View: 7151

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This book assesses whether a new category of religious actors has been constructed within international law. Religious actors, through their interpretations of the religion(s) they are associated with, uphold and promote, or indeed may transform, potentially oppressive structures or discriminatory patterns. This study moves beyond the concern that religious texts and practices may be incompatible with international law, to provide an innovative analysis of how religious actors themselves are accountable under international law for the interpretations they choose to put forward. The book defines religious actors as comprising religious states, international organizations, and non-state entities that assume the role of interpreting religion and so claim a 'special' legitimacy anchored in tradition or charisma. Cutting across the state / non-state divide, this definition allows the full remit of religious bodies to be investigated. It analyses the crucial question of whether religious actors do in fact operate under different international legal norms to non-religious states, international organizations, or companies. To that end, the Holy See-Vatican, the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, and churches and religious organizations under the European Convention on Human Rights regime are examined in detail as case studies. The study ultimately establishes that religious actors cannot be seen to form an autonomous legal category under international law: they do not enjoy special or exclusive rights, nor incur lesser obligations, when compared to their respective non-religious peers. Going forward, it concludes that a process of two-sided legitimation may be at stake: religious actors will need to provide evidence for the legality of their religious interpretations to strengthen their legitimacy, and international law itself may benefit from religious actors fostering its legitimacy in different cultural contexts.