Vom Bootsflüchtling zum Bundesbürger

Migration, Integration und schulischer Erfolg in einer vietnamesischen Exilgemeinschaft

Author: Olaf Beuchling

Publisher: Waxmann Verlag

ISBN: 9783830912781

Category: Children of immigrants

Page: 314

View: 8387

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Dropping Out

Author: Russell W. Rumberger

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674063163

Category: Education

Page: 400

View: 6102

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Most kids in the developed world finish high school—but not in the United States. More than a million drop out every year, and the numbers are rising. Dropping Out provides answers to fundamental questions: Who drops out, and why? What happens to them when they do? How can we prevent at-risk kids from short-circuiting their futures?

School Dropout and Completion

International Comparative Studies in Theory and Policy

Author: Stephen Lamb,Eifred Markussen,Richard Teese,Nina Sandberg,John Polesel

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789048197637

Category: Education

Page: 410

View: 4923

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School dropout remains a persistent and critical issue in many school systems, so much so that it is sometimes referred to as a crisis. Populations across the globe have come to depend on success at school for establishing careers and gaining access to post-school qualifications. Yet large numbers of young people are excluded from the advantages that successful completion of school brings and as a result are subjected to consequences such as higher likelihood of unemployment, lower earnings, greater dependence on welfare and poorer physical health and well-being. Over recent decades, most western nations have stepped up their efforts to reduce drop out and raise school completion rates while maintaining high standards. How school systems have approached this, and how successful they are, varies. This book compares the various approaches by evaluating their impact on rates of dropout and completion. Case studies of national systems are used to highlight the different approaches including institutional arrangements and the various alternative secondary school programs and their outcomes. The evaluation is based on several key questions: What are the main approaches? How do they work? For whom do they work? And, how successful are they in promoting high rates of completion and equivalent outcomes for all? This book examines the nature of the dropout problem in advanced industrialized countries with the goal of developing a broader, international understanding that can feed into public policy to help improve completion rates worldwide.

Language, Literacy, and Power in Schooling

Author: Teresa L. McCarty

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135621829

Category: Education

Page: 352

View: 6157

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Language, Literacy, and Power in Schooling brings critical ethnographic perspectives to bear on language, literacy, and power in culturally and linguistically diverse contexts, showing how literacy and schooling are negotiated by children and adults and how schooling becomes a key site of struggle over whose knowledge, discourses, and literacy practices "count." Part I examines tensions between the local and the general in literacy development and use; Part II considers face-to-face interactions surrounding literacy practices in ethnically diverse classrooms; and Part III widens the ethnographic lens to position literacy practices in the context of globalization and contemporary education policies. Each section includes a substantive introduction by the editor and a synthetic commentary by a leading literacy researcher. Above all, this is a book oriented toward social action. Unpacking the complexity of literacy practices and experiences in diverse settings, the authors seek not only to build new knowledge, but to inform and transform the pedagogies and policies that limit human potentials. The chapters in this volume have much to teach us about the roots of inequality and the possibilities for positive change. Together, they highlight the urgent need for critical literacy researchers to engage politically, confronting education policies that deny the rich multiplicity of human literacies, thereby carving ever-deeper cleavages between those with and without access to literacies of power. The dual focus on language and literacy with critical-ethnographic accounts of identity and schooling speaks to a growing constituency of scholars and practitioners concerned with the role of literacy and discourse in alternatively affirming or negating knowledge, power, and identity, both within and outside of schools.

Urban High Schools

Foundations and Possibilities

Author: Annette B. Hemmings

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136835873

Category: Education

Page: 168

View: 4351

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This multidisciplinary overview introduces readers to the historical, sociological, anthropological, and political foundations of urban public secondary schooling and to possibilities for reform. Focused on critical and problematic elements, the text provides a comprehensive description and analyses of urban public high schooling through different yet intertwined disciplinary lenses. Students and researchers seeking to inform their work with urban high schools from social, cultural, and political perspectives will find the theoretical frameworks and practical applications useful in their own studies of, or initiatives related to, urban public high schools. Each chapter includes concept boxes with synopses of key ideas, summations, and discussion questions.

At a Loss

Teachers' Perspectives on the Academic Performance of Mexican-origin Students in a California High School

Author: Carlotta C. de Ortiz

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Mexican American teenagers

Page: 430

View: 1862

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Minority Education

Anthropological Perspectives

Author: Evelyn Jacob,Cathie Jordan

Publisher: Praeger Pub Text

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 281

View: 9054

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This volume brings the perspectives of educational anthropology to the consideration of the education of ethnic and linguistic minority students and to the challenges often associated with that enterprise. Built around a core of chapters originally published in the Anthropology and Education Quarterly, which presented two major anthropological perspectives on school success and failure for minority students, focuses on the cultural difference approach and the discontinuity approach. Each is represented by a theoretical chapter and two case studies. Chapters contrast anthropological and nonanthropological perspectives on minority education, outlining key concepts and methods in educational anthropology for readers who may be unfamiliar with the field. A later section offers recent modifications or additions to the two major perspectives. These chapters examine the role of parents and community in minority education, call attention to the cultural groupings that an form in response to the school context itself, focus attention on children as active decision-makers in school, and question the validity of the whole conceptualization of school success and failure. Concluding chapters on applying anthropological perspectives to policy and practice.

Serendipity

Fortune and the Prepared Mind

Author: Mark de Rond,Iain Morley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052118181X

Category: Reference

Page: 152

View: 8615

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Serendipity is a fascinating but elusive concept, and one which has been surprisingly influential in many areas of human discovery. The essays in this volume provide insightful and entertaining accounts of the relationship between serendipity and knowledge by some of the most eminent thinkers of this generation.

Anthropology, Economics, and Choice

Author: Michael Chibnik

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292735359

Category: Social Science

Page: 206

View: 1181

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In the midst of global recession, angry citizens and media pundits often offer simplistic theories about how bad decisions lead to crises. Many economists, however, base their analyses on rational choice theory, which assumes that decisions are made by well-informed, intelligent people who weigh risks, costs, and benefits. Taking a more realistic approach, the field of anthropology carefully looks at the underlying causes of choices at different times and places. Using case studies of choices by farmers, artisans, and bureaucrats drawn from Michael Chibnik's research in Mexico, Peru, Belize, and the United States, Anthropology, Economics, and Choice presents a clear-eyed perspective on human actions and their economic consequences. Five key issues are explored in-depth: choices between paid and unpaid work; ways people deal with risk and uncertainty; how individuals decide whether to cooperate; the extent to which households can be regarded as decision-making units; and the "tragedy of the commons," the theory that social chaos may result from unrestricted access to commonly owned property. Both an accessible primer and an innovative exploration of economic anthropology, this interdisciplinary work brings fresh insight to a timely topic.

Creating the Dropout

An Institutional and Social History of School Failure

Author: Sherman Dorn

Publisher: Praeger Publishers

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 167

View: 3139

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Dorn (special education, Vanderbilt U.) argues that the high school dropout rate in the US is a socially defined problem, and that it is being viewed from a narrow and unhelpful perspective. The problem was invented when more students began attending secondary school, he says, and officials assumed

Trickster

An Anthropological Memoir

Author: Eileen Kane

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442693754

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 2011

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A young trainee anthropologist leaves her violent Mafia-run hometown—Youngstown, Ohio—to study an "exotic" group, the Paiute Indians of Nevada. This is 1964; she'll be "the expert," and they'll be "the subjects." The Paiute elders have other ideas. They'll be "the parents." They set themselves two tasks: to help her get a good grade on her project and to send her home quickly to her new bridegroom. They dismiss her research topic and introduce her instead to their spirit creature, the outrageously mischievous rule-breaking trickster, Coyote. Why do the Paiutes love Coyote? Why do Youngstown mill workers vote for Mafia candidates for municipal office? Tricksters become key to understanding how oppressed groups function in a hostile world. For more information visit www.trickster.ie.

Mars Life

Author: Ben Bova

Publisher: Tor Books

ISBN: 1429969881

Category: Fiction

Page: 432

View: 4661

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Jamie Waterman discovered the cliff dwelling on Mars, and the fact that an intelligent race lived on the red planet sixty-five million years ago, only to be driven into extinction by the crash of a giant meteor. Now the exploration of Mars is itself under threat of extinction, as the ultraconservative New Morality movement gains control of the U.S. government and cuts off all funding for the Mars program. Meanwhile, Carter Carleton, an anthropologist who was driven from his university post by unproven charges of rape, has started to dig up the remains of a Martian village. Science and politics clash on two worlds as Jamie desperately tries to save the Mars program and uncover who the vanished Martians were. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

The New Sociology of Knowledge

The Life and Work of Peter L. Berger

Author: Michaela Pfadenhauer,Peter L. Berger

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 1412850959

Category: Social Science

Page: 175

View: 1523

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A classical sociologist can be defined as someone whose "works occupied a central position among the sociological ideas and notions of an era." Following this criterion, Michaela Pfadenhauer demonstrates the relevance of Peter L. Berger’s work to the sociology of knowledge. Pfadenhauer shows that Berger is not only a sociologist of religion, but one whose works are characterized by a sociology-of-knowledge perspective. Berger stands out among his fellow social scientists both quantitatively and qualitatively. He has written numerous books, which have been translated into many languages, and a multitude of essays in scholarly journals and popular magazines. For decades, he has played a role in shaping both public debate and social scientific discourse in America and far beyond. As a sociologist of knowledge, Berger has played three roles: he has been a theoretician of modern life, an analyst of modern religiosity, and an empiricist of global economic culture. In all areas, the focus on processes rather than status quo is characteristic of Berger’s thinking. This book provides an in-depth view on the critical thinking of one of the most important sociologists that present times has to offer. It includes four written essays by Berger.

The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of the Contemporary World

Author: Paul Graves-Brown,Rodney Harrison,Angela Piccini

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191663956

Category: Social Science

Page: 864

View: 6183

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It has been clear for many years that the ways in which archaeology is practised have been a direct product of a particular set of social, cultural, and historical circumstances - archaeology is always carried out in the present. More recently, however, many have begun to consider how archaeological techniques might be used to reflect more directly on the contemporary world itself: how we might undertake archaeologies of, as well as in the present. This Handbook is the first comprehensive survey of an exciting and rapidly expanding sub-field and provides an authoritative overview of the newly emerging focus on the archaeology of the present and recent past. In addition to detailed archaeological case studies, it includes essays by scholars working on the relationships of different disciplines to the archaeology of the contemporary world, including anthropology, psychology, philosophy, historical geography, science and technology studies, communications and media, ethnoarchaeology, forensic archaeology, sociology, film, performance, and contemporary art. This volume seeks to explore the boundaries of an emerging sub-discipline, to develop a tool-kit of concepts and methods which are applicable to this new field, and to suggest important future trajectories for research. It makes a significant intervention by drawing together scholars working on a broad range of themes, approaches, methods, and case studies from diverse contexts in different parts of the world, which have not previously been considered collectively.

Nursing Research Using Participatory Action Research

Qualitative Designs and Methods in Nursing

Author: Mary De Chesnay, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, FAAN

Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

ISBN: 0826126146

Category: Medical

Page: 247

View: 3955

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"PAR is the ultimate in social justice practice. I suggest that PAR should be the basis for all nursing research. This book will provide you with the basics for getting started." óPatricia J. Kelly, PhD, MPH, APRN University of MissouriñKansas City (From the Foreword) Participatory action research is a qualitative research method conducted in collaboration with a community of people in order to effect changes in the community that are relevant to the residents. This is a practical, "how-to" resource for conducting participatory action research that guides readers, step by step, through planning, conducting, and disseminating nursing research using this qualitative design. It is part of a unique series of seven books devoted to nursing research using qualitative designs and methods. Examples from actual research along with author commentary illustrate potential pitfalls and challenges that may occur during the process and how to resolve them. Written by a leading scholar of nursing research and nurse experts in participatory action research, the book describes its philosophical underpinnings and state-of-the-art techniques, and provides a concrete road map for planning and conducting studies. It considers why this particular research method is best suited for a particular study, ethical considerations, and potential obstacles. The book also discusses how to ensure rigor during a study, providing examples from scholarly literature and the authorsí own work. Each case example features a description of the study, including why the investigator decided to use participatory action rather than another research design, how he or she solved gatekeeper and access-to-sample issues, and institutional review board concerns. Also included is a discussion of how to collect and analyze data and how to disseminate findings to both the scientific community and research participants. With a focus on practical problem solving throughout, the book will be of value to novice and experienced nurse researchers, graduate teachers, in-service educators, students, and nursing research staff at health care institutions. Key Features: Describes, step by step, how to plan, conduct, and disseminate participatory action research Delivers new designs and methods Focuses on solving practical problems related to the conduct of research Features rich nursing exemplars in a variety of health/mental health clinical conditions in the United States and internationally