Dropping Out

Author: Russell W. Rumberger

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674063163

Category: Education

Page: 400

View: 1351

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Most kids in the developed world finish high school—but not in the United States. More than a million drop out every year, and the numbers are rising. Dropping Out provides answers to fundamental questions: Who drops out, and why? What happens to them when they do? How can we prevent at-risk kids from short-circuiting their futures?

On the Edge of the Law

Culture, Labor, and Deviance on the South Texas Border

Author: Chad Richardson,Rosalva Resendiz

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292774506

Category: Social Science

Page: 367

View: 5878

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The Valley of South Texas is a region of puzzling contradictions. Despite a booming economy fueled by free trade and rapid population growth, the Valley typically experiences high unemployment and low per capita income. The region has the highest rate of drug seizures in the United States, yet its violent crime rate is well below national and state averages. The Valley's colonias are home to the poorest residents in the nation, but their rates of home ownership and intact two-parent families are among the highest in the country for low-income residential areas. What explains these apparently irreconcilable facts? Since 1982, faculty and students associated with the Borderlife Research Project at the University of Texas-Pan American have interviewed thousands of Valley residents to investigate and describe the cultural and social life along the South Texas-Northern Mexico border. In this book, Borderlife researchers clarify why Valley culture presents so many apparent contradictions as they delve into issues that are "on the edge of the law"—traditional health care and other cultural beliefs and practices, displaced and undocumented workers, immigration enforcement, drug smuggling, property crime, criminal justice, and school dropout rates. The researchers' findings make it plain that while these issues present major challenges for the governments of the United States and Mexico, their effects and contradictions are especially acute on the border, where residents must daily negotiate between two very different economies; health care, school, and criminal justice systems; and worldviews.

School Dropout and Completion

International Comparative Studies in Theory and Policy

Author: Stephen Lamb,Eifred Markussen,Richard Teese,Nina Sandberg,John Polesel

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789048197637

Category: Education

Page: 410

View: 8865

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School dropout remains a persistent and critical issue in many school systems, so much so that it is sometimes referred to as a crisis. Populations across the globe have come to depend on success at school for establishing careers and gaining access to post-school qualifications. Yet large numbers of young people are excluded from the advantages that successful completion of school brings and as a result are subjected to consequences such as higher likelihood of unemployment, lower earnings, greater dependence on welfare and poorer physical health and well-being. Over recent decades, most western nations have stepped up their efforts to reduce drop out and raise school completion rates while maintaining high standards. How school systems have approached this, and how successful they are, varies. This book compares the various approaches by evaluating their impact on rates of dropout and completion. Case studies of national systems are used to highlight the different approaches including institutional arrangements and the various alternative secondary school programs and their outcomes. The evaluation is based on several key questions: What are the main approaches? How do they work? For whom do they work? And, how successful are they in promoting high rates of completion and equivalent outcomes for all? This book examines the nature of the dropout problem in advanced industrialized countries with the goal of developing a broader, international understanding that can feed into public policy to help improve completion rates worldwide.

Chicano School Failure and Success

Past, Present, and Future

Author: Richard R. Valencia

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134516436

Category: Education

Page: 348

View: 2194

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First published in 1991. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Anthropology, Economics, and Choice

Author: Michael Chibnik

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292735359

Category: Social Science

Page: 206

View: 1086

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In the midst of global recession, angry citizens and media pundits often offer simplistic theories about how bad decisions lead to crises. Many economists, however, base their analyses on rational choice theory, which assumes that decisions are made by well-informed, intelligent people who weigh risks, costs, and benefits. Taking a more realistic approach, the field of anthropology carefully looks at the underlying causes of choices at different times and places. Using case studies of choices by farmers, artisans, and bureaucrats drawn from Michael Chibnik's research in Mexico, Peru, Belize, and the United States, Anthropology, Economics, and Choice presents a clear-eyed perspective on human actions and their economic consequences. Five key issues are explored in-depth: choices between paid and unpaid work; ways people deal with risk and uncertainty; how individuals decide whether to cooperate; the extent to which households can be regarded as decision-making units; and the "tragedy of the commons," the theory that social chaos may result from unrestricted access to commonly owned property. Both an accessible primer and an innovative exploration of economic anthropology, this interdisciplinary work brings fresh insight to a timely topic.

Serendipity

Fortune and the Prepared Mind

Author: Mark de Rond,Iain Morley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052118181X

Category: Reference

Page: 152

View: 4271

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Serendipity is a fascinating but elusive concept, and one which has been surprisingly influential in many areas of human discovery. The essays in this volume provide insightful and entertaining accounts of the relationship between serendipity and knowledge by some of the most eminent thinkers of this generation.

Cultural Conflict & Adaptation

Author: Henry T. Trueba,Lila Jacobs,Elizabeth Kirton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317854780

Category: Education

Page: 157

View: 7340

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First published in 1990. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Mars Life

Author: Ben Bova

Publisher: Tor Books

ISBN: 1429969881

Category: Fiction

Page: 432

View: 9946

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Jamie Waterman discovered the cliff dwelling on Mars, and the fact that an intelligent race lived on the red planet sixty-five million years ago, only to be driven into extinction by the crash of a giant meteor. Now the exploration of Mars is itself under threat of extinction, as the ultraconservative New Morality movement gains control of the U.S. government and cuts off all funding for the Mars program. Meanwhile, Carter Carleton, an anthropologist who was driven from his university post by unproven charges of rape, has started to dig up the remains of a Martian village. Science and politics clash on two worlds as Jamie desperately tries to save the Mars program and uncover who the vanished Martians were. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Tally's Corner

A Study of Negro Streetcorner Men

Author: Elliot Liebow

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 0585479194

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 7848

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The first edition of Tally's Corner, a sociological classic selling more than one million copies, was the first compelling response to the culture of poverty thesis—that the poor are different and, according to conservatives, morally inferior—and alternative explanations that many African Americans are caught in a tangle of pathology owing to the absence of black men in families. The debate has raged up to the present day. Yet Liebow's shadow theory of values—especially the values of poor, urban, black men—remains the single most parsimonious account of the reasons why the behavior of the poor appears to be at odds with the values of the American mainstream. While Elliot Liebow's vivid narrative of "street-corner" black men remains unchanged, the new introductions to this long-awaited revised edition bring the book up to date. Wilson and Lemert describe the debates since 1965 and situate Liebow's classic text in respect to current theories of urban poverty and race. They account for what Liebow might have seen had he studied the street corner today after welfare has been virtually ended and the drug economy had taken its toll. They also take stock of how the new global economy is a source of added strain on the urban poor. Discussion of field methods since the 1960s rounds out the book's new coverage.

My Freshman Year

What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student

Author: Rebekah Nathan

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780143037477

Category: Education

Page: 186

View: 5710

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Feeling out of touch with her students, an anthropology professor describes how she enrolled as a freshman student at college in order to gain new insight into modern-day undergraduate culture. Reprint. 40,000 first printing.

The New Sociology of Knowledge

The Life and Work of Peter L. Berger

Author: Michaela Pfadenhauer,Peter L. Berger

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 1412850959

Category: Social Science

Page: 175

View: 318

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A classical sociologist can be defined as someone whose "works occupied a central position among the sociological ideas and notions of an era." Following this criterion, Michaela Pfadenhauer demonstrates the relevance of Peter L. Berger’s work to the sociology of knowledge. Pfadenhauer shows that Berger is not only a sociologist of religion, but one whose works are characterized by a sociology-of-knowledge perspective. Berger stands out among his fellow social scientists both quantitatively and qualitatively. He has written numerous books, which have been translated into many languages, and a multitude of essays in scholarly journals and popular magazines. For decades, he has played a role in shaping both public debate and social scientific discourse in America and far beyond. As a sociologist of knowledge, Berger has played three roles: he has been a theoretician of modern life, an analyst of modern religiosity, and an empiricist of global economic culture. In all areas, the focus on processes rather than status quo is characteristic of Berger’s thinking. This book provides an in-depth view on the critical thinking of one of the most important sociologists that present times has to offer. It includes four written essays by Berger.

How to Think Like an Anthropologist

Author: Matthew Engelke

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400889529

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 5923

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From an award-winning anthropologist, a lively accessible, and at times irreverent introduction to the subject What is anthropology? What can it tell us about the world? Why, in short, does it matter? For well over a century, cultural anthropologists have circled the globe, from Papua New Guinea to suburban England and from China to California, uncovering surprising facts and insights about how humans organize their lives and articulate their values. In the process, anthropology has done more than any other discipline to reveal what culture means--and why it matters. By weaving together examples and theories from around the world, Matthew Engelke provides a lively, accessible, and at times irreverent introduction to anthropology, covering a wide range of classic and contemporary approaches, subjects, and practitioners. Presenting a set of memorable cases, he encourages readers to think deeply about some of the key concepts with which anthropology tries to make sense of the world—from culture and nature to authority and blood. Along the way, he shows why anthropology matters: not only because it helps us understand other cultures and points of view but also because, in the process, it reveals something about ourselves and our own cultures, too.

The Interpretation of Cultures

Author: Clifford Geertz

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465093566

Category: Social Science

Page: 576

View: 4294

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In The Interpretation of Cultures, the most original anthropologist of his generation moved far beyond the traditional confines of his discipline to develop an important new concept of culture. This groundbreaking book, winner of the 1974 Sorokin Award of the American Sociological Association, helped define for an entire generation of anthropologists what their field is ultimately about.

Anthropology and the Public Interest

Fieldwork and Theory

Author: Peggy Reeves Sanday

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 1483270394

Category: Social Science

Page: 392

View: 4654

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Anthropology and the Public Interest: Field work and Theory provides an understanding of how culture affects human lives, and uses this understanding in formulating and implementing domestic social policy. This book defines basic research as contributing to theory, knowledge, and method that contributes to the advancement of social science. Organized into four parts encompassing 19 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the greatest potential payoff for the advancement of social science and for enlightened social programming. This text then presents an insightful discussion of why cultural differences among people have gone so largely unrecognized. Other chapters consider the cultural or language processes of contemporary U.S. populations. This book discusses as well the changing environment that gave rise to the tremendous growth in academic anthropology. The final chapter deals with social indicators research and discusses the potential role of anthropology in such work. This book is a valuable resource for anthropologists.

Narcissistic Leaders

Who Succeeds and Who Fails

Author: Michael Maccoby

Publisher: Crown Business

ISBN: 0767910257

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 300

View: 2453

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Today's business leaders maintain a higher profile than their predecessors did in the 1950s through the 1980s. Rather than hide behind the corporate veil, they give interviews to magazines like Business Week, Time, and The Economist. According to psychoanalyst, anthropologist, and consultant Michael Maccoby, this love of the limelight often stems from their personalities—in a narcissistic personality. That is both good and bad news: Narcissists are good for companies that need people with vision and the courage to take them in new directions. But narcissists can also lead companies into trouble by refusing to listen to the advice and warnings of their managers. So what can the narcissistic leader do to avoid the traps of his own personality? Maccoby argues that today’s most innovative leaders are not consensus-building bureaucrats; they are “productive narcissists” with the interrelated set of skills —foresight, systems thinking, visioning, motivating, and partnering—that he terms “strategic intelligence.” Maccoby redefines the negative stereotype as the personality best suited to lead during times of rapid social and economic change.

Picture Perfect

Author: Jodi Picoult

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101147139

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 8276

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From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Leaving Time, The Storyteller, and Nineteen Minutes... To the outside world, they seem to have it all. Cassie Barrett, a renowned anthropologist, and Alex Rivers, one of Hollywood's hottest actors, met on the set of a motion picture in Africa. They shared childhood tales, toasted the future, and declared their love in a fairy-tale wedding. But when they return to California, something alters the picture of their perfect marriage. A frightening pattern is taking shape—a cycle of hurt, denial, and promises, thinly veiled by glamour. Torn between fear and something that resembles love, Cassie wrestles with questions she never dreamed she would face: How can she leave? Then again, how can she stay?

Modern Philosophy

An Introduction and Survey

Author: Roger Scruton

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1448210518

Category: Philosophy

Page: 650

View: 2699

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Roger Scruton is one of the most widely respected philosophers of our time, whose often provocative views never fail to simulate debate. In Modern Philosophy he turns his attention to the whole of the field, from the philosophy of logic to aesthetics, and in so doing provides us with an essential and comprehensive guide to modern thinking.