What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do

Black Professional Women Workers during the Jim Crow Era

Author: Stephanie J. Shaw

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226751309

Category: Political Science

Page: 364

View: 3821

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Stephanie J. Shaw takes us into the inner world of American black professional women during the Jim Crow era. This is a story of struggle and empowerment, of the strength of a group of women who worked against daunting odds to improve the world for themselves and their people. Shaw's remarkable research into the lives of social workers, librarians, nurses, and teachers from the 1870s through the 1950s allows us to hear these women's voices for the first time. The women tell us, in their own words, about their families, their values, their expectations. We learn of the forces and factors that made them exceptional, and of the choices and commitments that made them leaders in their communities. What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do brings to life a world in which African-American families, communities, and schools worked to encourage the self-confidence, individual initiative, and social responsibility of girls. Shaw shows us how, in a society that denied black women full professional status, these girls embraced and in turn defined an ideal of "socially responsible individualism" that balanced private and public sphere responsibilities. A collective portrait of character shaped in the toughest circumstances, this book is more than a study of the socialization of these women as children and the organization of their work as adults. It is also a study of leadership—of how African American communities gave their daughters the power to succeed in and change a hostile world.

What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do

Black Professional Women Workers during the Jim Crow Era

Author: Stephanie J. Shaw

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226751309

Category: Political Science

Page: 364

View: 7949

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Stephanie J. Shaw takes us into the inner world of American black professional women during the Jim Crow era. This is a story of struggle and empowerment, of the strength of a group of women who worked against daunting odds to improve the world for themselves and their people. Shaw's remarkable research into the lives of social workers, librarians, nurses, and teachers from the 1870s through the 1950s allows us to hear these women's voices for the first time. The women tell us, in their own words, about their families, their values, their expectations. We learn of the forces and factors that made them exceptional, and of the choices and commitments that made them leaders in their communities. What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do brings to life a world in which African-American families, communities, and schools worked to encourage the self-confidence, individual initiative, and social responsibility of girls. Shaw shows us how, in a society that denied black women full professional status, these girls embraced and in turn defined an ideal of "socially responsible individualism" that balanced private and public sphere responsibilities. A collective portrait of character shaped in the toughest circumstances, this book is more than a study of the socialization of these women as children and the organization of their work as adults. It is also a study of leadership—of how African American communities gave their daughters the power to succeed in and change a hostile world.

What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do

Black Professional Women Workers During the Jim Crow Era

Author: Stephanie J. Shaw

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226751191

Category: Political Science

Page: 347

View: 8187

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Stephanie J. Shaw takes us into the inner world of American black professional women during the Jim Crow era. This is a story of struggle and empowerment, of the strength of a group of women who worked against daunting odds to improve the world for themselves and their people. Shaw's remarkable research into the lives of social workers, librarians, nurses, and teachers from the 1870s through the 1950s allows us to hear these women's voices for the first time. The women tell us, in their own words, about their families, their values, their expectations. We learn of the forces and factors that made them exceptional, and of the choices and commitments that made them leaders in their communities. What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do brings to life a world in which African-American families, communities, and schools worked to encourage the self-confidence, individual initiative, and social responsibility of girls. Shaw shows us how, in a society that denied black women full professional status, these girls embraced and in turn defined an ideal of "socially responsible individualism" that balanced private and public sphere responsibilities. A collective portrait of character shaped in the toughest circumstances, this book is more than a study of the socialization of these women as children and the organization of their work as adults. It is also a study of leadership—of how African American communities gave their daughters the power to succeed in and change a hostile world.

What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do

Black Professional Women Workers during the Jim Crow Era

Author: Stephanie J. Shaw

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226751207

Category: Political Science

Page: 363

View: 7410

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Stephanie J. Shaw takes us into the inner world of American black professional women during the Jim Crow era. This is a story of struggle and empowerment, of the strength of a group of women who worked against daunting odds to improve the world for themselves and their people. Shaw's remarkable research into the lives of social workers, librarians, nurses, and teachers from the 1870s through the 1950s allows us to hear these women's voices for the first time. The women tell us, in their own words, about their families, their values, their expectations. We learn of the forces and factors that made them exceptional, and of the choices and commitments that made them leaders in their communities. What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do brings to life a world in which African-American families, communities, and schools worked to encourage the self-confidence, individual initiative, and social responsibility of girls. Shaw shows us how, in a society that denied black women full professional status, these girls embraced and in turn defined an ideal of "socially responsible individualism" that balanced private and public sphere responsibilities. A collective portrait of character shaped in the toughest circumstances, this book is more than a study of the socialization of these women as children and the organization of their work as adults. It is also a study of leadership—of how African American communities gave their daughters the power to succeed in and change a hostile world.

No Constitutional Right to Be Ladies

Women and the Obligations of Citizenship

Author: Linda K. Kerber

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0809073846

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 6522

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By turning upside down the traditional paradigm of women's history as one of rights, Kerber shows us that there is no "right" to be excused from the obligations of citizenship. Hers is an invaluable new way of understanding the history of women in America - and American history more generally.

Invisible Activists

Women of the Louisiana NAACP and the Struggle for Civil Rights, 1915--1945

Author: Lee Sartain

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 0807135763

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 7272

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Behind the historical accounts of the great men of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People lies the almost forgotten story of the black women who not only participated in the organization but actually helped it thrive in the early twentieth-century South. In Invisible Activists, Lee Sartain examines attitudes toward gender, class, and citizenship of African American activists in Louisiana and women's roles in the campaign for civil rights in the state. In the end, he argues, it was women working behind the scenes in Louisiana's branches of the NAACP who were the most crucial factor in the organization's efficiency and survival. During the first half of the twentieth century -- especially in the darkest days of the Great Depression, when membership waned and funds were scarce -- a core group of women maintained Louisiana's NAACP. Fighting on the front line, Sartain explains, women acted as grassroots organizers, running public relations campaigns and membership drives, mobilizing youth groups, and promoting general community involvement. Using case studies of several prominent female NAACP members in Louisiana, Sartain demonstrates how women combined their fundraising skills with an extensive network of community and family ties to fund the NAACP and, increasingly, to undertake the day-to-day operations of the local organizations themselves. Still, these women also struggled against the double obstacles of racism and sexism that prevented them from attaining the highest positions within NAACP branch leadership. Sartain illustrates how the differences between the sexes were ultimately woven into the political battle for racial justice, where women were viewed as having inherent moral superiority and, hence, the potential to lift the black population as a whole. Sartain concludes that despite the societal traditions that kept women out of leadership positions, in the early stages of the civil rights movement, their skills and their contributions as community matriarchs provided the keys to the organization's progress. Highly original and essential to a comprehensive study of the NAACP, Invisible Activists gives voice to the many individual women who sustained the influential civil rights organization during a time of severe racial oppression in Louisiana. Without such dedication, Sartain asserts, the organization would have had no substantial presence in the state.

Alabama Women

Their Lives and Times

Author: Susan Youngblood Ashmore,Lisa Lindquist Dorr

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820350796

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 364

View: 5687

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Another addition to the Southern Women series, Alabama Women celebrates women's histories in the Yellowhammer State by highlighting the lives and contributions of women and enriching our understanding of the past and present. Exploring such subjects as politics, arts, and civic organizations, this collection of eighteen biographical essays provides a window into the social, cultural, and geographic milieux of women's lives in Alabama. Featured individuals include Augusta Evans Wilson, Maria Fearing, Julia S. Tutwiler, Margaret Murray Washington, Pattie Ruffner Jacobs, Ida E. Brandon Mathis, Ruby Pickens Tartt, Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald, Sara Martin Mayfield, Bess Bolden Walcott, Virginia Foster Durr, Rosa Parks, Lurleen Burns Wallace, Margaret Charles Smith, and Harper Lee. Contributors: -Nancy Grisham Anderson on Harper Lee -Harriet E. Amos Doss on the enslaved women surgical patients of J. Marion Sims -Wayne Flynt and Marlene Hunt Rikard on Pattie Ruffner Jacobs -Caroline Gebhard on Bess Bolden Walcott -Staci Simon Glover on the immigrant women in metropolitan Birmingham -Sharony Green on the Townsend Family -Sheena Harris on Margaret Murray Washington -Christopher D. Haveman on the women of the Creek Removal Era -Kimberly D. Hill on Maria Fearing -Tina Naremore Jones on Ruby Pickens Tartt -Jenny M. Luke on Margaret Charles Smith -Rebecca Cawood McIntyre on Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald and Sara Martin Mayfield -Rebecca S. Montgomery on Ida E. Brandon Mathis -Paul M. Pruitt Jr. on Julia S. Tutwiler -Susan E. Reynolds on Augusta Evans Wilson -Patricia Sullivan on Virginia Foster Durr -Jeanne Theoharis on Rosa Parks -Susan Youngblood Ashmore on Lurleen Burns Wallace

Dangers Seen and Unseen

Black Women's Mobility, Community and Work During the Migration Era, 1915-1940

Author: LaTrese Evette Adkins

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: African American women

Page: 264

View: 4288

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Toward a Common Ground

American Studies Association Annual Meeting : Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the Pittsburgh Hilton & Towers, November 9-12, 1995

Author: American Studies Association. Annual Meeting

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: 213

View: 7145

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In the Shadow of Garvey

Garveyites in New York City and the British Caribbean, 1925-1950

Author: Daniel A. Dalrymple

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Electronic dissertations

Page: 588

View: 7089

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Their Eyes Were Watching God

Author: Zora Neale Hurston

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252017780

Category: Fiction

Page: 231

View: 9987

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When Janie Starks returns home, the small Black community buzzes with gossip about the outcome of her affair with a younger man

Chokehold

Policing Black Men

Author: Paul Butler

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1620974983

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 8996

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Nominated for the 49th NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work (Nonfiction) A 2017 Washington Post Notable Book A Kirkus Best Book of 2017 “Butler has hit his stride. This is a meditation, a sonnet, a legal brief, a poetry slam and a dissertation that represents the full bloom of his early thesis: The justice system does not work for blacks, particularly black men.” —The Washington Post “The most readable and provocative account of the consequences of the war on drugs since Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow . . . .” —The New York Times Book Review “Powerful . . . deeply informed from a legal standpoint and yet in some ways still highly personal” —The Times Literary Supplement (London) With the eloquence of Ta-Nehisi Coates and the persuasive research of Michelle Alexander, a former federal prosecutor explains how the system really works, and how to disrupt it Cops, politicians, and ordinary people are afraid of black men. The result is the Chokehold: laws and practices that treat every African American man like a thug. In this explosive new book, an African American former federal prosecutor shows that the system is working exactly the way it’s supposed to. Black men are always under watch, and police violence is widespread—all with the support of judges and politicians. In his no-holds-barred style, Butler, whose scholarship has been featured on 60 Minutes, uses new data to demonstrate that white men commit the majority of violent crime in the United States. For example, a white woman is ten times more likely to be raped by a white male acquaintance than be the victim of a violent crime perpetrated by a black man. Butler also frankly discusses the problem of black on black violence and how to keep communities safer—without relying as much on police. Chokehold powerfully demonstrates why current efforts to reform law enforcement will not create lasting change. Butler’s controversial recommendations about how to crash the system, and when it’s better for a black man to plead guilty—even if he’s innocent—are sure to be game-changers in the national debate about policing, criminal justice, and race relations.

Children of Fire

A History of African Americans

Author: Thomas C. Holt

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 9780809067138

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 2094

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Ordinary people don’t experience history as it is taught by historians. They live across the convenient chronological divides we impose on the past. The same people who lived through the Civil War and the eradication of slavery also dealt with the hardships of Reconstruction, so why do we almost always treat them separately? In Children of Fire, renowned historian Thomas C. Holt challenges this form to tell the story of generations of African Americans through the lived experience of the subjects themselves, with all of the nuances, ironies, contradictions, and complexities one might expect. Building on seminal books like John Hope Franklin’s From Slavery to Freedom and many others, Holt captures the entire African American experience from the moment the first twenty African slaves were sold at Jamestown in 1619. Each chapter focuses on a generation of individuals who shaped the course of American history, hoping for a better life for their children but often confronting the ebb and flow of their civil rights and status within society. Many familiar faces grace these pages—Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, and Barack Obama—but also some overlooked ones. Figures like Anthony Johnson, a slave who bought his freedom in late seventeenth century Virginia and built a sizable plantation, only to have it stolen away from his children by an increasingly racist court system. Or Frank Moore, a WWI veteran and sharecropper who sued his landlord for unfair practices, but found himself charged with murder after fighting off an angry white posse. Taken together, their stories tell how African Americans fashioned a culture and identity amid the turmoil of four centuries of American history.