The Nineteenth Century

The British Isles, 1815-1901

Author: Henry Colin Gray Matthew

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198731434

Category: History

Page: 342

View: 9553

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This new eleven-volume series will span the history of the British Isles from the Roman Era to the present. Each volume consists of essays by leading historians who focus on key issues for the period--including society, economy, religion, politics, and culture. The chapters are at once wide-ranging surveys and searching analyses. They are written for the non-specialist but include new and important findings, making them equally valuable for academics across a range of disciplines. The Nineteenth Century is the inaugural volume in the series and covers the peak of Britain's world power. The book sets out to describe the force and complexity of that experience, and to cover, in an interdisciplinary way, the political, economic, and cultural history of the British Isles between 1815 and 1901. It looks at the Victorian economy, as well as Victorian public life, as a cultural and political narrative. It includes chapters on women and domesticity; the interplay of religion, intellect, and science; art; architecture and the city; and the literature, theater, and music of the time. The book provides a vivid portrait of this crucial moment in British history and is ideal for both the student of modern history and the general reader.

The Idea of Greater Britain

Empire and the Future of World Order, 1860-1900

Author: Duncan Bell

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400827978

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 8030

DOWNLOAD NOW »

During the tumultuous closing decades of the nineteenth century, as the prospect of democracy loomed and as intensified global economic and strategic competition reshaped the political imagination, British thinkers grappled with the question of how best to organize the empire. Many found an answer to the anxieties of the age in the idea of Greater Britain, a union of the United Kingdom and its settler colonies in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and southern Africa. In The Idea of Greater Britain, Duncan Bell analyzes this fertile yet neglected debate, examining how a wide range of thinkers conceived of this vast "Anglo-Saxon" political community. Their proposals ranged from the fantastically ambitious--creating a globe-spanning nation-state--to the practical and mundane--reinforcing existing ties between the colonies and Britain. But all of these ideas were motivated by the disquiet generated by democracy, by challenges to British global supremacy, and by new possibilities for global cooperation and communication that anticipated today's globalization debates. Exploring attitudes toward the state, race, space, nationality, and empire, as well as highlighting the vital theoretical functions played by visions of Greece, Rome, and the United States, Bell illuminates important aspects of late-Victorian political thought and intellectual life.

The seventeenth century

Author: Jenny Wormald

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198731610

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 1251

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Aimed at undergraduates studying the history of the British Isles in the 17th century, this book covers the period 1603-1688. Further reading is included, as well as a chronology and index.

The British Isles Since 1945

Author: Kathleen Burk

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199248384

Category: History

Page: 277

View: 9746

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Since 1945 Great Britain has gone through many changes: the loss of an empire, economic decline and resurgence, entry into Europe, evolution into a multicultural society, and devolution, to name only the more obvious. In this book, six distinguished historians each take a theme - politics, international relations, high, middle , and low culture, social and economic policies, the nature of civil society, and Ireland - and set out the fundamental nature and development of each. These are set within the wider context of the Cold War, and its impact both internationally and domestically; of the impact on politics, economics and foreign policy of the decline of the pound and the attempts to arrest this; and finally, of the growing impact of Europe.

The Rise of Respectable Society

A Social History of Victorian Britain, 1830-1900

Author: Francis Michael Longstreth Thompson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674772854

Category: History

Page: 382

View: 9790

DOWNLOAD NOW »

One of England's grand masters of history provides a clear and persuasive interpretation of the creation of "respectable society" in Victorian Britain. Integrating a vast amount of research previously hidden in obscure or academic journals, he covers not only the economy, social structure, and patterns of authority, but also marriage and the family, childhood, homes and houses, work and play. By 1900 the structure of British society had become more orderly and well-defined than it had been in the 1830s and 1840s, but the result, Thompson shows, was fragmentation into a multiplicity of sections or classes with differing standards and notions of respectability. Each group operated its own social controls, based on what it considered acceptable or unacceptable conduct. This "internalized and diversified" respectability was not the cohesive force its middle-class and evangelical proponents had envisioned. The Victorian experience thus bequeathed structural problems, identity problems, and authority problems to the twentieth century, with which Britain is grappling.

The Eighteenth Century

1688-1815

Author: Paul Langford

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191583200

Category: History

Page: 302

View: 845

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This volume takes a thematic approach to the history of the eighteenth century in the British Isles, covering such issues as domestic politics (including popular political culture), religious developments and change, and social and demographic structure and growth. Paul Langford heads a leading team of contributors, to present a lively picture of an era of intense change and growth in which all parts of Britain and Ireland were increasingly bound together by economic expansion and political unification.

At Home with the Empire

Metropolitan Culture and the Imperial World

Author: Catherine Hall,Sonya O. Rose

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139460099

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9343

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This pioneering 2006 volume addresses the question of how Britain's empire was lived through everyday practices - in church and chapel, by readers at home, as embodied in sexualities or forms of citizenship, as narrated in histories - from the eighteenth century to the present. Leading historians explore the imperial experience and legacy for those located, physically or imaginatively, 'at home,' from the impact of empire on constructions of womanhood, masculinity and class to its influence in shaping literature, sexuality, visual culture, consumption and history-writing. They assess how people thought imperially, not in the sense of political affiliations for or against empire, but simply assuming it was there, part of the given world that had made them who they were. They also show how empire became a contentious focus of attention at certain moments and in particular ways. This will be essential reading for scholars and students of modern Britain and its empire.

The Absent-minded Imperialists

Empire, Society, and Culture in Britain

Author: Bernard Porter

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199299595

Category: History

Page: 475

View: 8580

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The British empire was a huge enterprise. To foreigners it more or less defined Britain in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Its repercussions in the wider world are still with us today. It also had a great impact on Britain herself: for example, on her economy, security, population, and eating habits. One might expect this to have been reflected in her society and culture. Indeed, this has now become the conventional wisdom: that Britain was steeped in imperialism domestically, which affected (or infected) almost everything Britons thought, felt, and did. This is the first book to examine this assumption critically against the broader background of contemporary British society. Bernard Porter, a leading imperial historian, argues that the empire had a far lower profile in Britain than it did abroad. Many Britons could hardly have been aware of it for most of the nineteenth century and only a small number was in any way committed to it. Between these extremes opinions differed widely over what was even meant by the empire. This depended largely on class, and even when people were aware of the empire, it had no appreciable impact on their thinking about anything else. Indeed, the influence far more often went the other way, with perceptions of the empire being affected (or distorted) by more powerful domestic discourses. Although Britain was an imperial nation in this period, she was never a genuine imperial society. As well as showing how this was possible, Porter also discusses the implications of this attitude for Britain and her empire, and for the relationship between culture and imperialism more generally, bringing his study up to date by including the case of the present-day USA.

After Rome

Author: T. M. Charles-Edwards,Thomas Charles-Edwards,Paul Langford

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 342

View: 4978

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The chapters in this volume, each written by a leading scholar of the period, analyze in turn the different nationalities and kingdoms that existed in the British Isles from the end of the Roman empire to the coming of the Vikings, the process of conversion to Christianity, the development of art and of a written culture, and the interaction between this written culture and the societies of the day.

British Women in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Kathryn Gleadle

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1403937540

Category: History

Page: 250

View: 9936

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This synthesis is a clear assessment of 19th-century British women. It aims to provide students with an in depth understanding of the key historiographical debates and issues, placing particular emphasis upon revisionist research. The book highlights not merely the ideologies and economic circumstances which shaped women's lives, but highlights the sheer diversity of women's own experiences and identities. In so doing, it presents a positive but nuanced interpretation of women's roles within their own families and communities, as well as stressing women's enormous contribution to the making of contemporary British culture and society.

Handbook of British Romanticism

Author: Ralf Haekel

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 3110376695

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 725

View: 3810

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The Handbook of British Romanticism is a state of the art investigation of Romantic literature and theory, a field that probably changed more quickly and more fundamentally than any other traditional era in literary studies. Since the early 1980s, Romantic studies has widened its scope significantly: The canon has been expanded, hitherto ignored genres have been investigated and new topics of research explored. After these profound changes, intensified by the general crisis of literary theory since the turn of the millennium, traditional concepts such as subjectivity, imagination and the creative genius have lost their status as paradigms defining Romanticism. The handbook will feature discussions of key concepts such as history, class, gender, science and the use of media as well as a thorough account of the most central literary genres around the turn of the 19th century. The focus of the book, however, will lie on a discussion of key literary texts in the light of the most recent theoretical developments. Thus, the Handbook of British Romanticism will provide students with an introduction to Romantic literature in general and literary scholars with a discussion of innovative and groundbreaking theoretical developments.

The British Isles, 1901-1951

Author: Christopher Dougherty

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 285

View: 8675

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The British Isles entered the twentieth century as a single state, 'Great Britain and Ireland, ' with a 'British Empire' greater in extent and larger in population than the world had ever seen. The first fifty years of the new century saw vast change both at home and abroad. Each chapter in this volume focuses on a specific aspect of the rapidly changing historical landscape of British history in this period: politics, economics, society, culture, the wars, and foreign policy, combining specialist attention to each area with an emphasis on ...

The Social Lives of Forests

Past, Present, and Future of Woodland Resurgence

Author: Susanna B. Hecht,Kathleen D. Morrison,Christine Padoch

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022602413X

Category: Science

Page: 464

View: 8796

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Forests are in decline, and the threats these outposts of nature face—including deforestation, degradation, and fragmentation—are the result of human culture. Or are they? This volume calls these assumptions into question, revealing forests’ past, present, and future conditions to be the joint products of a host of natural and cultural forces. Moreover, in many cases the coalescence of these forces—from local ecologies to competing knowledge systems—has masked a significant contemporary trend of woodland resurgence, even in the forests of the tropics. Focusing on the history and current use of woodlands from India to the Amazon, The Social Lives of Forests attempts to build a coherent view of forests sited at the nexus of nature, culture, and development. With chapters covering the effects of human activities on succession patterns in now-protected Costa Rican forests; the intersection of gender and knowledge in African shea nut tree markets; and even the unexpectedly rich urban woodlands of Chicago, this book explores forests as places of significant human action, with complex institutions, ecologies, and economies that have transformed these landscapes in the past and continue to shape them today. From rain forests to timber farms, the face of forests—how we define, understand, and maintain them—is changing.

Gladstone and Ireland

Politics, Religion and Nationality in the Victorian Age

Author: D. G. Boyce,A. O'Day

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230292453

Category: History

Page: 307

View: 5224

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Explains how William Gladstone responded to the 'Irish Question', and in so doing changed the British and Irish political landscape. Religion, land, self-government and nationalism became subjects of intensive political debate, raising issues about the constitution and national identity of the whole United Kingdom.

A Mad, Bad, and Dangerous People?

England 1783-1846

Author: Boyd Hilton

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199218919

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 784

View: 8447

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Boyd Hilton examines the changes in politics and society in the years 1783-1846, showing how the raffish and rakish style of eighteenth-century society, having reached a peak in the Regency, then succumbed to the new norms of respectability popularly known as 'Victorianism'.

Understanding the Victorians

Politics, Culture and Society in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Author: Susie L. Steinbach

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134818254

Category: History

Page: 362

View: 7709

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Understanding the Victorians paints a vivid portrait of this era of dramatic change, combining broad survey with close analysis and introducing students to the critical debates taking place among historians today. Encompassing all of Great Britain and Ireland over the whole of the Victorian period, it gives prominence to social and cultural topics alongside politics and economics and emphasises class, gender, and racial and imperial positioning as constitutive of human relations. This second edition is fully updated throughout, containing a new chapter on leisure in the Victorian period, the most recent historiographical research in Victorian Studies, and enhanced coverage of imperialism and working-class life. Starting with the Queen Caroline Affair in 1820 and coming up to the start of World War I in 1914, Susie L. Steinbach uses thematic chapters to discuss and evaluate topics such as politics, imperialism, the economy, class, gender, the monarchy, arts and entertainment, religion, sexuality, religion, and science. There are also three chapters on space, consumption, and the law, topics rarely covered at this introductory level. With a clear introduction outlining the key themes of the period, a detailed timeline, and suggestions for further reading and relevant internet resources, this is the ideal companion for all students of the nineteenth century.

Women, Crime and Justice in England Since 1660

Author: Shani D'Cruze,Louise A. Jackson

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137057203

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 6899

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Shani D'Cruze and Louise A. Jackson provide students with a lively overview of women's relationship to the criminal justice system in England, exploring key debates in the regulation of 'respectable' and 'deviant' femininities over the last four centuries. Major issues include: • attitudes towards murder and infanticide * prostitution • the decline of witchcraft belief * sexual violence • the 'girl delinquent' * theft and fraud The volume also examines women's participation in illegal forms of protest and political activism, their experience of penal regimes as well as strategies of resistance, and their involvement in occupations associated with criminal justice itself. Assuming that men and women cannot be studied in isolation, D'Cruze and Jackson make reference to recent studies of masculinity and comment on the ways in which relations between men and women have been understood and negotiated across time. Featuring examples drawn from a rich range of sources such as court records, autobiographies, literature and film, this is an ideal introduction to an increasingly popular area of study.

Working Class Cultures in Britain, 1890-1960

Gender, Class and Ethnicity

Author: Prof Joanna Bourke,Joanna Bourke

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134858582

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4004

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Integrating a variety of historical approaches and methods, Joanna Bourke looks at the construction of class within the intimate contexts of the body, the home, the marketplace, the locality and the nation to assess how the subjective identity of the 'working class' in Britain has been maintained through seventy years of radical social, cultural and economic change. She argues that class identity is essentially a social and cultural rather than an institutional or political phenomenon and therefore cannot be understood without constant reference to gender and ethnicity. Each self contained chapter consists of an essay of historical analysis, introducing students to the ways historians use evidence to understand change, as well as useful chronologies, statistics and tables, suggested topics for discussion, and selective further reading.

The Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries

Author: Ralph Alan Griffiths

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198731429

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 2173

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The late Middle Ages was a period marked by This book encompasses the histories of England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, and also considers the relationships between the different parts of the British Isles. Six chapters examine key themes in turn: society and population, economic life,religion, intellectual and cultural life and cultural expression kingdoms and dominions at peace and at war, and kingship and government. Specially commissioned from six leading historians, these chapters provide lively and authoritative coverage of the main developments of the period. Includingmaps, a chronology, and an introduction and conclusion by Ralph Griffiths to draw together key points, this book provides an integrated and accessible account of British history in the later Middle Ages.

Politics without Democracy

England 1815-1918

Author: Michael Bentley

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631218128

Category: History

Page: 356

View: 7166

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Politics Without Democracy provides an entertaining and highly original view of how Britain made a peaceful transition to representative democracy - a change characterized in other countries by convulsive and bloody civil strife.