The Making of English Popular Culture

Author: John Storey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317519663

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

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The Making of English Popular Culture provides an account of the making of popular culture in the nineteenth century. While a form of what we might describe as popular culture existed before this period, John Storey has assembled a collection that demonstrates how what we now think of as popular culture first emerged as a result of the enormous changes that accompanied the industrial revolution. Particularly significant are the technological changes that made the production of new forms of culture possible and the concentration of people in urban areas that created significant audiences for this new culture. Consisting of fourteen original chapters that cover diverse topics ranging from seaside holidays and the invention of Christmas tradition, to advertising, music and popular fiction, the collection aims to enhance our understanding of the relationship between culture and power, as explored through areas such as ‘race’, ethnicity, class, sexuality and gender. It also aims to encourage within cultural studies a renewed historical sense when engaging critically with popular culture by exploring the historical conditions surrounding the existence of popular texts and practices. Written in a highly accessible style The Making of English Popular Culture is an ideal text for undergraduates studying cultural and media studies, literary studies, cultural history and visual culture.

Saracens and the Making of English Identity

The Auchinleck Manuscript

Author: Siobhain Bly Calkin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135471649

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

View: 6217

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This book explores the ways in which discourses of religious, racial, and national identity blur and engage each other in the medieval West. Specifically, the book studies depictions of Muslims in England during the 1330s and argues that these depictions, although historically inaccurate, served to enhance and advance assertions of English national identity at this time. The book examines Saracen characters in a manuscript renowned for the variety of its texts, and discusses hagiographic legends, elaborations of chronicle entries, and popular romances about Charlemagne, Arthur, and various English knights. In these texts, Saracens engage issues such as the demarcation of communal borders, the place of gender norms and religion in communities' self-definitions, and the roles of violence and history in assertions of group identity. Texts involving Saracens thus serve both to assert an English identity, and to explore the challenges involved in making such an assertion in the early fourteenth century when the English language was regaining its cultural prestige, when the English people were increasingly at odds with their French cousins, and when English, Welsh, and Scottish sovereignty were pressing matters.

E Pluribus Barnum

The Great Showman and the Making of U.S. Popular Culture

Author: Bluford Adams

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9780816626311

Category: Social Science

Page: 249

View: 2927

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The first book to consider the career of P. T. Barnum from a cultural studies perspective. Phineas Taylor Barnum lived from 1810 until 1891, and in the eighty-one years of his life he created show business as we know it. In E Pluribus Barnum, Bluford Adams investigates the influence Barnum had on American popular culture of the nineteenth century, and expands our understanding of the ways he continues to influence us today. Beginning with a discussion of Barnum's early shows, Adams demonstrates the dynamic interplay between Barnum's increasingly "respectable" aspirations for his entertainments and his active cultivation of middle-class sensibilities in his audiences. In his discussion of the 1850-51 concert tour of the "Swedish Nightingale" Jenny Lind, Adams explores the role played by women's rights and class issues in Barnum's management of these concerts. Barnum's American Museum and the "moral dramas" presented in its theater are examined, as well as the later circuses. Adams relates the rise of Barnum to the emergence of a new U.S. society, one riven by conflicts over slavery, feminism, immigration, and capitalism, and considers his career as a crucial moment in the on-going struggle over the politics of U.S. commercial entertainments.

The Game of Our Lives

The Meaning and Making of English Football

Author: David Goldblatt

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0670920592

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 400

View: 5356

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WINNER of the William Hill Sports Book of the Year Award 2015 In the last two decades football in Britain has made the transition from a peripheral dying sport to the very centre of our popular culture, from an economic basket-case to a booming entertainment industry. What does it mean when football becomes so central to our private and political lives? Has it enriched us or impoverished us? In this sparkling book David Goldblatt argues that no social phenomenon tracks the momentous economic, social and political changes of the post-Thatcherite era in a more illuminating manner than football, and no cultural practice sheds more light on the aspirations and attitudes of our long boom and now calamitous bust. A must-read for the thinking football fan, The Game of Our Lives will appeal to readers of Fever Pitch by Nick Hornby and Inverting the Pyramid by Jonathan Wilson. It will also be relished by readers of British social history such as Austerity Britain by David Kynaston. 'Brilliantly incisive. Goldblatt is not merely the best football historian writing today, he is possibly the best there has ever been. Goldblatt's book could hardly be more impressive' Sunday Times

Englishness: Twentieth-Century Popular Culture and the Forming of English Identity

Twentieth-Century Popular Culture and the Forming of English Identity

Author: Simon Featherstone

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748632549

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 3017

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This book examines the conflicts, dilemmas and contradictions that marked Englishness as the nation changed from an imperial power to a postcolonial state. The chapters deal with travel writing, popular song, music hall and variety theatre, dances, elocution lessons, cricket and football, and national festivals, as well as literature and film. 'High' and 'popular' cultures are brought together in dialogue, and the diversity as well as the problematic nature of English identity is emphasised. The case studies are linked by their interests in different kinds of performances of being English, and by a particular focus upon the voice and the body as key sites for the struggles of modern England. The book is a lively contribution to current interdisciplinary debates about Englishness, national cultures and postcolonial identities. It is relevant to undergraduate students of literature, drama, film, politics and sociology, and will also appeal to a general readership.

The Anarchy of Empire in the Making of U.S. Culture

Author: Amy Kaplan

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674017597

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 3993

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Kaplan shows how U.S. imperialism--from "Manifest Destiny" to the "American Century"--has profoundly shaped key elements of American culture at home, and how the struggle for power over foreign peoples and places has disrupted the quest for domestic order.

Montmartre and the Making of Mass Culture

Author: Gabriel P. Weisberg

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813530093

Category: Art

Page: 296

View: 4703

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Located on the fringes of Paris, Montmartre attracted artists such as Toulouse-Lautrec, Picasso, Steinlen, and Jules Chéret. By the beginning of the twentieth century, the artists in the quarter began to create works blurring the boundaries between fine art and popular illustration, the artist and the audience, as well as class and gender distinctions. The creative expression that ensued was an exuberant mix of high and low-a breeding ground for what is today termed popular culture. The carefully interlocked essays in Montmartre and the Making of Mass Culture demonstrate how and why this quarter was at the forefront of such innovation. The contributors bring an unprecedented range of approaches to the topic, from political and religious history to art historical investigations and literary analysis of texts. This project is the first of its kind to examine fully Montmartre's many contributions to the creation of a mass culture that reigned supreme in the twentieth century.

Mongrel Nation

Diasporic Culture and the Making of Postcolonial Britain

Author: Ashley Dawson

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472069910

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 226

View: 7368

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Mongrel Nation surveys the history of the United Kingdom’s African, Asian, and Caribbean populations from 1948 to the present, working at the juncture of cultural studies, literary criticism, and postcolonial theory. Ashley Dawson argues that during the past fifty years Asian and black intellectuals from Sam Selvon to Zadie Smith have continually challenged the United Kingdom’s exclusionary definitions of citizenship, using innovative forms of cultural expression to reconfigure definitions of belonging in the postcolonial age. By examining popular culture and exploring topics such as the nexus of race and gender, the growth of transnational politics, and the clash between first- and second-generation immigrants, Dawson broadens and enlivens the field of postcolonial studies. Mongrel Nation gives readers a broad landscape from which to view the shifting currents of politics, literature, and culture in postcolonial Britain. At a time when the contradictions of expansionist braggadocio again dominate the world stage, Mongrel Nation usefully illuminates the legacy of imperialism and suggests that creative voices of resistance can never be silenced.Dawson “Elegant, eloquent, and full of imaginative insight, Mongrel Nation is a refreshing, engaged, and informative addition to post-colonial and diasporic literary scholarship.” —Hazel V. Carby, Yale University “Eloquent and strong, insightful and historically precise, lively and engaging, Mongrel Nation is an expansive history of twentieth-century internationalist encounters that provides a broader landscape from which to understand currents, shifts, and historical junctures that shaped the international postcolonial imagination.” —May Joseph, Pratt Institute Ashley Dawson is Associate Professor of English at the City University of New York’s Graduate Center and the College of Staten Island. He is coeditor of the forthcoming Exceptional State: Contemporary U.S. Culture and the New Imperialism.

The Making of Middlebrow Culture

Author: Joan Shelley Rubin

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807864265

Category: History

Page: 438

View: 8270

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The proliferation of book clubs, reading groups, "outline" volumes, and new forms of book reviewing in the first half of the twentieth century influenced the tastes and pastimes of millions of Americans. Joan Rubin here provides the first comprehensive analysis of this phenomenon, the rise of American middlebrow culture, and the values encompassed by it. Rubin centers her discussion on five important expressions of the middlebrow: the founding of the Book-of-the-Month Club; the beginnings of "great books" programs; the creation of the New York Herald Tribune's book-review section; the popularity of such works as Will Durant's The Story of Philosophy; and the emergence of literary radio programs. She also investigates the lives and expectations of the individuals who shaped these middlebrow institutions--such figures as Stuart Pratt Sherman, Irita Van Doren, Henry Seidel Canby, Dorothy Canfield Fisher, John Erskine, William Lyon Phelps, Alexander Woollcott, and Clifton Fadiman. Moreover, as she pursues the significance of these cultural intermediaries who connected elites and the masses by interpreting ideas to the public, Rubin forces a reconsideration of the boundary between high culture and popular sensibility.

Intellectual Politics and Cultural Conflict in the Romantic Period

Scottish Whigs, English Radicals and the Making of the British Public Sphere

Author: Dr Alex Benchimol

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409475832

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 8377

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Intellectual Politics and Cultural Conflict in the Romantic Period maps the intellectual formation of English plebeian radicalism and Scottish philosophic Whiggism over the long eighteenth century and examines their associated strategies of critical engagement with the cultural, social and political crises of the early nineteenth century. It is a story of the making of a wider British public sphere out of the agendas and discourses of the radical and liberal publics that both shaped and responded to them. When juxtaposed, these competing intellectual formations illustrate two important expressions of cultural politics in the Romantic period, as well as the peculiar overlapping of national cultural histories that contributed to the ideological conflict over the public meaning of Britain's industrial modernity. Alex Benchimol's study provides an original contribution to recent scholarship in Romantic period studies centred around the public sphere, recovering the contemporary debates and national cultural histories that together made up a significant part of the ideological landscape of the British public sphere in the early nineteenth century.

Englishness: Twentieth-Century Popular Culture and the Forming of English Identity

Twentieth-Century Popular Culture and the Forming of English Identity

Author: Simon Featherstone

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748632549

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 3340

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This book examines the conflicts, dilemmas and contradictions that marked Englishness as the nation changed from an imperial power to a postcolonial state. The chapters deal with travel writing, popular song, music hall and variety theatre, dances, elocution lessons, cricket and football, and national festivals, as well as literature and film. 'High' and 'popular' cultures are brought together in dialogue, and the diversity as well as the problematic nature of English identity is emphasised. The case studies are linked by their interests in different kinds of performances of being English, and by a particular focus upon the voice and the body as key sites for the struggles of modern England. The book is a lively contribution to current interdisciplinary debates about Englishness, national cultures and postcolonial identities. It is relevant to undergraduate students of literature, drama, film, politics and sociology, and will also appeal to a general readership.

Britishness, Popular Music, and National Identity

The Making of Modern Britain

Author: Irene Morra

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135048959

Category: Music

Page: 254

View: 9886

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This book offers a major exploration of the social and cultural importance of popular music to contemporary celebrations of Britishness. Rather than providing a history of popular music or an itemization of indigenous musical qualities, it exposes the influential cultural and nationalist rhetoric around popular music and the dissemination of that rhetoric in various forms. Since the 1960s, popular music has surpassed literature to become the dominant signifier of modern British culture and identity. This position has been enforced in popular culture, literature, news and music media, political rhetoric -- and in much popular music itself, which has become increasingly self-conscious about the expectation that music both articulate and manifest the inherent values and identity of the modern nation. This study examines the implications of such practices and the various social and cultural values they construct and enforce. It identifies two dominant, conflicting constructions around popular music: music as the voice of an indigenous English ‘folk’, and music as the voice of a re-emergent British Empire. These constructions are not only contradictory but also exclusive, prescribing a social and musical identity for the nation that ignores its greater creative, national, and cultural diversity. This book is the first to offer a comprehensive critique of an extremely powerful discourse in England that today informs dominant formulations of English and British national identity, history, and culture.

St George and the Dragons

The Making of English Identity

Author: Michael Collins

Publisher: Fonthill Media

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 5050

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St George's Day has become a topic of debate as more and more organizations promote celebrations on 23 April and more people wave the flag of St George to proclaim their allegiance and identity. But who was St George? How did this Near Eastern martyr become England's patron saint and an icon of English culture? And what is his relevance for today's secular, multicultural England? New research reveals that from the third century St George was revered as a healer, protector of women and the poor and patron of agriculture and metal-working more than a military dragon-slayer. Discover the origin of the cross of St George and the roles of Richard I, Edward III and Henry VIII in making St George the patron saint of England. With a foreword by Professor Emeritus Dan Brown, this richly-illustrated celebration of English culture shows how St George can be reinterpreted for our times while remaining true to our English heritage. St George can be enlisted in the cause of ecology, the campaign against FGM, and the fight to end modern slavery and resettle refugees. English yet international, revered both by Christians and Muslims, St George is a multicultural figure who symbolizes universal values.

Oscar Wilde and Modern Culture

The Making of a Legend

Author: Joseph Bristow

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN: 0821418386

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 355

View: 4931

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The contributors explore the meteoric rise, sudden fall and legendary resurgence of an immensely influential writer's reputation from his hectic 1881 American lecture tour to recent Hollywood adaptations of his dramas.

Making History

Writings on History and Culture

Author: Edward Palmer Thompson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781565842175

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 7369

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A collection of twenty historical and review essays published over a period of thirty years covers topics ranging from Mary Wollstonecraft to the British family

Poetry and the Making of the English Literary Past, 1660-1781

Author: Richard G. Terry

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780198186236

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 354

View: 8877

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Concentrating on the period 1660-1781, this book explores how the English literary past was made. It charts how antiquarians unearthed the raw materials of the English (or more widely) British tradition; how scholars drafted narratives about the development of native literature; and how critics assigned the leading writers to canons of literary greatness. Poetry and the Making of the English Literary Past also analyzes the various kinds of occasion on which the contents of the literary past are rehearsed. Discussed, for example, is the rise of Poets' Corner as a national shrine for the consecration of literary worthies; and the author also considers a wide range of poetic genres that lent themselves to recitals of the literary past: the funeral elegy, the progress-of-poesy poem and the session of the poets poem. The book concludes that the opening up and ordering of the English literary past occurs earlier than is generally supposed; and the same also applies to the process bywhich women writers achieve their own distinctive form of canonical recognition.

Montmartre and the Making of Mass Culture

Author: Gabriel P. Weisberg

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813530093

Category: Art

Page: 296

View: 3893

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Located on the fringes of Paris, Montmartre attracted artists such as Toulouse-Lautrec, Picasso, Steinlen, and Jules Chéret. By the beginning of the twentieth century, the artists in the quarter began to create works blurring the boundaries between fine art and popular illustration, the artist and the audience, as well as class and gender distinctions. The creative expression that ensued was an exuberant mix of high and low-a breeding ground for what is today termed popular culture. The carefully interlocked essays in Montmartre and the Making of Mass Culture demonstrate how and why this quarter was at the forefront of such innovation. The contributors bring an unprecedented range of approaches to the topic, from political and religious history to art historical investigations and literary analysis of texts. This project is the first of its kind to examine fully Montmartre's many contributions to the creation of a mass culture that reigned supreme in the twentieth century.

Congregational Missions and the Making of an Imperial Culture in Nineteenth-Century England

Author: Susan Thorne

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804765442

Category: History

Page: 247

View: 5511

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This book explores the missionary movement's influence on popular perceptions of empire and race in nineteenth-century England. The foreign missionary endeavor was one of the most influential of the channels through which nineteenth-century Britons encountered the colonies, and because of their ties to organized religion, foreign missionary societies enjoyed more regular access to a popular audience than any other colonial lobby. Focusing on the influential denominational case of English Congregationalism, this study shows how the missionary movement's audience in Britain was inundated with propaganda designed to mobilize financial and political support for missionary operations abroad, propaganda in which the imperial context and colonized targets of missionary operations figured prominently. In her attention to the local social contexts in which missionary propaganda was disseminated, the author departs from the predominantly cultural thrust of recent studies of imperialism's popularization. She shows how Congregationalists made use of the language and institutional space provided by missions in their struggles to negotiate local relations of power. In the process, the missionary project was implicated in some of the most important developments in the social history of nineteenth-century Britain -- the popularization of organized religion and its subsequent decline, the emergence and evolution of a language of class, the gendered making of a middle class, and the strange death of British liberalism.

Customs in Common

Studies in Traditional Popular Culture

Author: E. P. Thompson

Publisher: New Press/ORIM

ISBN: 1620972166

Category: Social Science

Page: 560

View: 7283

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An epic and intimate firsthand account of a true American hero’s daring journey into the heart of the Amazon forest in the nineteenth-century. “Meticulously researched, elegantly argued and deeply humane,” Customs in Common describes the complex culture from which working class institutions emerged in England—a panoply of traditions and customs that the new working class fought to preserve well into Victorian times (The New York Times Book Review). This remarkable sequel to E. P. Thompson’s influential, landmark volume of social history, The Making of the English Working Class, investigates the gradual disappearance of a range of cultural customs against the backdrop of the great upheavals of the eighteenth century. As villagers were subjected to a legal system increasingly hostile to custom, they tried both to resist and to preserve tradition, becoming, as Thompson explains, “rebellious, but rebellious in defence of custom.” Although some historians have written of riotous peasants of England and Wales as if they were mainly a problem for magistrates and governments, for Thompson it is the rulers, landowners, and governments who were a problem for the people, whose exuberant culture preceded the formation of working-class institutions and consciousness. Essential reading for all those intrigued by English history, Customs in Common has a special relevance today, as traditional economies are being replaced by market economies throughout the world. The rich scholarship and depth of insight in Thompson’s work offer many clues to understanding contemporary changes around the globe. “By providing a fuller sense of the way of life capitalism destroyed, Customs in Common helps us understand why the resistance to it was so protracted and tenacious . . . [This] long-awaited collection . . . is a signal contribution . . . [from] the person most responsible for inspiring the revival of American labor history during the past thirty years.” —The Nation “This book signals the return to historical writing of one of the most eloquent, powerful and independent voices of our time. At his best he is capable of a passionate, sardonic eloquence which is unequalled.” —The Observer