The Graves Are Walking

The Great Famine and the Saga of the Irish People

Author: John Kelly

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 0805095632

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 9259

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A magisterial account of one of the worst disasters to strike humankind--the Great Irish Potato Famine--conveyed as lyrical narrative history from the acclaimed author of The Great Mortality Deeply researched, compelling in its details, and startling in its conclusions about the appalling decisions behind a tragedy of epic proportions, John Kelly's retelling of the awful story of Ireland's great hunger will resonate today as history that speaks to our own times. It started in 1845 and before it was over more than one million men, women, and children would die and another two million would flee the country. Measured in terms of mortality, the Great Irish Potato Famine was the worst disaster in the nineteenth century--it claimed twice as many lives as the American Civil War. A perfect storm of bacterial infection, political greed, and religious intolerance sparked this catastrophe. But even more extraordinary than its scope were its political underpinnings, and The Graves Are Walking provides fresh material and analysis on the role that Britain's nation-building policies played in exacerbating the devastation by attempting to use the famine to reshape Irish society and character. Religious dogma, anti-relief sentiment, and racial and political ideology combined to result in an almost inconceivable disaster of human suffering. This is ultimately a story of triumph over perceived destiny: for fifty million Americans of Irish heritage, the saga of a broken people fleeing crushing starvation and remaking themselves in a new land is an inspiring story of revival. Based on extensive research and written with novelistic flair, The Graves Are Walking draws a portrait that is both intimate and panoramic, that captures the drama of individual lives caught up in an unimaginable tragedy, while imparting a new understanding of the famine's causes and consequences.

The Graves are Walking

Author: John Kelly

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN: 0571284434

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 8500

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The Irish famine that began in 1845 was one of the nineteenth century's greatest disasters. By its end, the island's population of eight million had shrunk by a third through starvation, disease and emigration. This is a brilliant, compassionate retelling of that awful story for a new generation - the first account for the general reader for many years and a triumphant example of narrative non-fiction at its best. The immediate cause of the famine was a bacterial infection of the potato crop on which too many the Irish poor depended. What turned a natural disaster into a human disaster was the determination of senior British officials to use relief policy as an instrument of nation-building in their oldest and most recalcitrant colony. Well-meaning civil servants were eager to modernise Irish agriculture and to improve the Irish moral character, which was utterly lacking in the virtues of the new age of triumphant capitalism. The result was a relief programme more concerned with fostering change than of saving lives. This is history that resonates powerfully with our own times.

The Great Famine and the Irish Diaspora in America

Author: Arthur Gribben

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558491731

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 7838

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Between 1845 and 1855, nearly 1.5 million Irish women, men, and children sailed to America to escape the Great Famine, triggered by successive years of potato blight. The famine and resulting emigration had a profound impact not only on the history of Ireland, but on that of England and North America as well. This volume of original essays commemorates the 150th anniversary of these epochal events and sheds new light on both the consequences of the famine and experience of the Irish in America.

Black Potatoes

The Story of the Great Irish Famine, 1845-1850

Author: Susan Campbell Bartoletti

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547530854

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 192

View: 2701

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In 1845, a disaster struck Ireland. Overnight, a mysterious blight attacked the potato crops, turning the potatoes black and destroying the only real food of nearly six million people. Over the next five years, the blight attacked again and again. These years are known today as the Great Irish Famine, a time when one million people died from starvation and disease and two million more fled their homeland. Black Potatoes is the compelling story of men, women, and children who defied landlords and searched empty fields for scraps of harvested vegetables and edible weeds to eat, who walked several miles each day to hard-labor jobs for meager wages and to reach soup kitchens, and who committed crimes just to be sent to jail, where they were assured of a meal. It’s the story of children and adults who suffered from starvation, disease, and the loss of family and friends, as well as those who died. Illustrated with black and white engravings, it’s also the story of the heroes among the Irish people and how they held on to hope.

The Famine Plot

England's Role in Ireland's Greatest Tragedy

Author: Tim Pat Coogan

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1137045175

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 832

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During a Biblical seven years in the middle of the nineteenth century, Ireland experienced the worst disaster a nation could suffer. Fully a quarter of its citizens either perished from starvation or emigrated, with so many dying en route that it was said, "you can walk dry shod to America on their bodies." In this grand, sweeping narrative, Ireland''s best-known historian, Tim Pat Coogan, gives a fresh and comprehensive account of one of the darkest chapters in world history, arguing that Britain was in large part responsible for the extent of the national tragedy, and in fact engineered the food shortage in one of the earliest cases of ethnic cleansing. So strong was anti-Irish sentiment in the mainland that the English parliament referred to the famine as "God's lesson." Drawing on recently uncovered sources, and with the sharp eye of a seasoned historian, Coogan delivers fresh insights into the famine's causes, recounts its unspeakable events, and delves into the legacy of the "famine mentality" that followed immigrants across the Atlantic to the shores of the United States and had lasting effects on the population left behind. This is a broad, magisterial history of a tragedy that shook the nineteenth century and still impacts the worldwide Irish diaspora of nearly 80 million people today.

All Standing

The Remarkable Story of the Jeanie Johnston, The Legendary Irish Famine Ship

Author: Kathryn Miles

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451610157

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 7163

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The story of an infant born at sea highlights the efforts of crewpeople and passengers to secure the survival of Irish citizens fleeing from the potato famine through acts of heroism and human decency.

Paddy's Lament, Ireland 1846-1847

Prelude to Hatred

Author: Thomas Gallagher

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780156707008

Category: History

Page: 345

View: 4661

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A shocking account of the great famine in Ireland, which sheds light on a bitter hatred for England that continues there today.

Irish Potato Famine

Author: Joseph R. O'Neill

Publisher: ABDO Publishing Company

ISBN: 1617851779

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 7479

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This title examines an important historic event, the Irish Potato Famine. Readers will learn the history of Ireland leading up to the famine, key players and happenings during the famine, and the eventÍs effect on society. Color photos and informative sidebars accompany easy-to-read, compelling text. Features include a timeline, facts, additional resources, web sites, a glossary, a bibliography, and an index. Essential Events is a series in Essential Library, an imprint of ABDO Publishing Company. Grades 6-9.

This Great Calamity

The Irish Famine 1845-52

Author: Christine Kinealy

Publisher: Roberts Rinehart Pub

ISBN: 9781570981401

Category: History

Page: 450

View: 1758

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The Irish famine of 1845-52 was the most decisive event in the history of Ireland. In a country of 8 million people, the Famine caused the death of approximately 1 million, forced a similar number to emigrate, and reduced the Irish population to just over 1 million by the beginning of the 20th century. This book unravels fact from opinion, confronts the role of ethnic stereotypes, and examines the ruling Anglo-Irish government's response to the disaster while analyzing its motives. She reveals the scope of the Famine's impact, showing how local communities were affected and provides a detailed account of the relief measures organized at both local and national levels. -- Publisher description

The Disaster of the Irish Potato Famine

Irish Immigrants Arrive in America (1845-1850)

Author: Sean O'Donoghue

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc

ISBN: 1508140669

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 24

View: 4432

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This book introduces readers to the Irish potato famine, a period when many Irish people were forced to make a decision: leave their homeland or starve. Readers will learn about the injustices the Irish faced in Ireland, as well as the challenges they faced when they reached the United States. The book also explains the success the Irish found after much hard work, and the legacy they left in America. Primary sources and vivid photographs illustrate captivating text to give readers a deep understanding of the subject. This book is an excellent supplement to social studies curricula and will provide a dynamic reading experience.

Killing Snows

Author: Charles Egan

Publisher: SilverWood Books

ISBN: 1781320586

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 420

View: 5728

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A fascinating, though shocking, story about love and survival during a desperate time in Irish history.

The Great Shame

And the Triumph of the Irish in the English-Speaking World

Author: Thomas Keneally

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0307764397

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 3558

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"Thomas Keneally recounts history with the uncanny skill of a great novelist whose only interest is to lay bare the human heart in all its hope and pain. As he was able to do in Schindler's List, he shows us in The Great Shame a people despised and rejected to the point of death, who in the face of all their sorrows manage to keep their souls. This story of oppression, famine, and emigration--a principal chapter in the story of man's inhumanity to man--becomes in Keneally's hands an act of resurrection; Irishmen and Irishwomen of a century and a half ago live once more within the pages of this book." --Thomas Cahill, author of How the Irish Saved Civilization In the nineteenth century, Ireland lost half of its population to famine, emigration to the United States and Canada, and the forced transportation of convicts to Australia. The forebears of Thomas Keneally, author of Schindler's List, were victims of that tragedy, and in The Great Shame Keneally has written an astonishing, monumental work that tells the full story of the Irish diaspora with the narrative grip and flair of a great novel. Based on unique research among little-known sources, this masterly book surveys eighty years of Irish history through the eyes of political prisoners--including Keneally's ancestors--who left Ireland in chains and eventually found glory, in one form or another, in Australia and America. We meet William Smith O'Brien, leader of an uprising at the height of the Irish Famine, who rose from solitary confinement in Australia to become the Mandela of his age; Thomas Francis Meagher, whose escape from Australian captivity led to a glittering American career as an orator, a Union general, and governor of Montana; John Mitchel, who became a Confederate newspaper reporter, gave two of his sons to the Southern cause, was imprisoned with Jefferson Davis--and returned to Ireland to become mayor of Tipperary; and John Boyle O'Reilly, who fled a life sentence in Australia to become one of nineteenth-century America's leading literary lights. Through the lives of many such men and women--famous and obscure, some heroes and some fools (most a little of both), all of them stubborn, acutely sensitive, and devastatingly charming--we become immersed in the Irish experience and its astonishing history. From Ireland to Canada and the United States to the bush towns of Australia, we are plunged into stories of tragedy, survival, and triumph. All are vividly portrayed in Keneally's spellbinding prose, as he reveals the enormous influence the exiled Irish have had on the English-speaking world. "A terrible and personal saga, history delivered with a scholar's density of detail but with the individualizing power of a multi-talented novelist." --William Kennedy

The great hunger, Ireland 1845-9

Author: Cecil Woodham Smith

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Famines

Page: 509

View: 6150

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The story of the 19th century Irish potato famine including discussions on its cause and its political, social, and economic effects.

Dark Rosaleen

Author: Michael Nicholson

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 075096586X

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 9166

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Love, death, and politics in a time of great famine and hardship in IrelandThis is a novel based on the true story of the Great Famine in Ireland of 1840s. Historically accurate, it is a story of murder and betrayal, of a failed rebellion, and the love of a national scandal. Charles Trevelyan was Secretary of the Treasury, and Director of the Famine Relief Programme at a time when famine raged and antipathy in English politics towards the plight of those affected raged equally. Kathryn, Charles' daughter, likewise felt no sympathy until the very scale of the tragedy became apparent. Joining the underground, she preached insurrection, stole food for the starving, and became the lover of the leader of the rebellion. She became known as Dark Rosaleen, the heroine of banned nationalist poem, was branded as both traitor and cause celebré. This is her story.

Three Famines

Starvation and Politics

Author: Thomas Keneally

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN: 1610390660

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 4324

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Through the lens of three of the most devastating food crises in modern history—the Górta Mor of British-ruled Ireland, the great famine of British-ruled Bengal in 1943, and the string of famines that plagued Ethiopia during the 1970s and 1980s, Booker Prize–winning author Thomas Keneally vividly evokes the terrible cost of mass starvation at the level of the individual who starves and the nation that watches. Famine is widely misunderstood as a completely natural catastrophe. Keneally recounts that while the triggers—crop, pestilence, and drought—are natural, the political and ideological choices that prolong famine are man-made. Government neglect and individual venality, not food shortages, are historically the causes of sustained, widespread hunger. In Ireland, British authorities ignored the existence of a food crisis while the famished fed on diseased cattle and human remains. In Bengal, where over four million starved to death, Field Marshal Archibald Wavell's reports of people dying in Calcutta's streets and demands for relief resulted in little more than a mocking cable from Winston Churchill asking, why, if food was so scarce, hadn't Gandhi died yet? In Ethiopia, Mengistu Haile Mariam arranged for 400,000 bottles of whisky to ship to Addis Ababa from Britain to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the revolution that put him in power, while one person died every twenty minutes in Korem. These three famines are stark examples of how throughout history, racial preconceptions, administrative neglect, and incompetence have been more lethal than the initiating blights or crop failures. Keneally's startling narrative history is a sobering warning to the authorities in charge of mercy in our time to stop making choices that feed famine instead of the starving.

The Irish Famine

A Documentary

Author: Colm Toibin,Diarmaid Ferriter

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780756778620

Category: History

Page: 214

View: 5523

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The Irish Potato Famine of the 1840s has been popularly perceived as a genocide attributable to the British gov't. In professional historical circles, however, such singular thinking was dismissed many years ago. And while British governmental sins of omission & commission during the famine played their part, there is a broader context of land agitation & regional influences of class conflict within Ireland that also contributed to the starvation of more than a million people. This book opens a door to understanding all sides of this tragedy with an absorbing history that is supported by a collection of key documents. An important piece of revisionist that is sure to become the classic primer for this lamentable period of Irish history.

The Great Shame

A Story of the Irish in the Old World and the New

Author: Thomas Keneally

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Convicts

Page: 731

View: 7643

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A new non-fiction book recounting the 19th century history of Ireland. The book traces the three causes of the halving of the Irish population in that century: the famine, the Irish emigrations to American and Canada, and the transportation of political activitists to Australia. It is a quest for the author's Irish ancestors.

The Search for God and Guinness

A Biography of the Beer that Changed the World

Author: Stephen Mansfield

Publisher: Thomas Nelson

ISBN: 1418580678

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 4198

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The history of Guinness, one of the world’s most famous brands, reveals the noble heights and generosity of a great family and an innovative business. It began in Ireland in the mid 1700s. The water in Ireland, indeed throughout Europe, was famously undrinkable, and the gin and whiskey that took its place devastated civil society. It was a disease ridden, starvation-plagued, alcoholic age, and Christians like Arthur Guinness—as well as monks and even evangelical churches—brewed beer that provided a healthier alternative to the poisonous waters and liquors of the times. This is where the Guinness tale began. Now, 250 years and over 150 countries later, Guinness is a global brand, one of the most consumed beverages in the world. The tale that unfolds during those two and a half centuries has power to thrill audiences today: the generational drama, business adventure, industrial and social reforms, deep-felt faith, and the noble beer itself. "Frothy, delicious, intoxicating and nutritious! No, I'm not talking about Guinness Stout—I'm talking about Stephen Mansfield's fabulous new book...The amazing and true story of how the Guinness family used its wealth and influence to touch millions is an absolute inspiration." — Eric Metaxas, New York Times best-selling author "It's a rare brew that takes faith, philanthropy and the frothy head of freshly-poured Guinness and combines them into such an inspiriting narrative. Cheers to brewmaster Stephen Mansfield! And cheers to you, the reader! You're in for a treat." — R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr., Founder and editor-in-chief of The American Spectator

The Irish Way

Becoming American in the Multiethnic City

Author: James R. Barrett

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101560592

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 794

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A lively, street-level history of turn-of-the-century urban life explores the Americanizing influence of the Irish on successive waves of migrants to the American city. In the newest volume in the award-winning Penguin History of American Life series, James R. Barrett chronicles how a new urban American identity was forged in the streets, saloons, churches, and workplaces of the American city. This process of “Americanization from the bottom up” was deeply shaped by the Irish. From Lower Manhattan to the South Side of Chicago to Boston’s North End, newer waves of immigrants and African Americans found it nearly impossible to avoid the Irish. While historians have emphasized the role of settlement houses and other mainstream institutions in Americanizing immigrants, Barrett makes the original case that the culture absorbed by newcomers upon reaching American shores had a distinctly Hibernian cast. By 1900, there were more people of Irish descent in New York City than in Dublin; more in the United States than in all of Ireland. But in the late nineteenth century, the sources of immigration began to shift, to southern and eastern Europe and beyond. Whether these newcomers wanted to save their souls, get a drink, find a job, or just take a stroll in the neighborhood, they had to deal with entrenched Irish Americans. Barrett reveals how the Irish vacillated between a progressive and idealistic impulse toward their fellow immigrants and a parochial defensiveness stemming from the hostility earlier generations had faced upon their own arrival in America. They imparted racist attitudes toward African Americans; they established ethnic “deadlines” across city neighborhoods; they drove other immigrants from docks, factories, and labor unions. Yet the social teachings of the Catholic Church, a sense of solidarity with the oppressed, and dark memories of poverty and violence in both Ireland and America ushered in a wave of progressive political activism that eventually embraced other immigrants. Drawing on contemporary sociological studies and diaries, newspaper accounts, and Irish American literature, The Irish Way illustrates how the interactions between the Irish and later immigrants on the streets, on the vaudeville stage, in Catholic churches, and in workplaces helped forge a multiethnic American identity that has a profound legacy in our cities today.

The Irish Americans

A History

Author: Jay P. Dolan

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1608190102

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 6678

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Follows the Irish from their first arrival in the American colonies through the bleak days of the potato famine, the decades of ethnic prejudice and nativist discrimination, the rise of Irish political power, and on to the historic moment when John F. Kennedy was elected to the highest office in the land.