The Dawn of Detroit

A Chronicle of Slavery and Freedom in the City of the Straits

Author: Tiya Miles

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1620972328

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 579

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2018 American Book Award Winner 2018 Frederick Douglass Book Prize Finalist Longlisted for the 2018 Cundill History Prize 2018 Nominee for the Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Legacy Award (Nonfiction) 2018 Merle Curti Social History Award Winner 2018 James A. Rawley Prize Co-Winner A New York Times Editor’s Choice selection A Michigan Notable Book of 2018 A Booklist Editors’ Choice Title for 2017 “If many Americans imagine slavery essentially as a system in which black men toiled on cotton plantations, Miles upends that stereotype several times over.” —New York Times Book Review “[Miles] has compiled documentation that does for Detroit what the Works Progress Administration and the Federal Writers’ Project slave narratives did for other regions, primarily the South.” —Washington Post “[Tiya Miles] is among the best when it comes to blending artful storytelling with an unwavering sense of social justice.” —Martha S. Jones in The Chronicle of Higher Education “A necessary work of powerful, probing scholarship.” —Publisher Weekly (starred) “A book likely to stand at the head of further research into the problem of Native and African-American slavery in the north country.” —Kirkus Reviews From the MacArthur genius grant winner, a beautifully written and revelatory look at the slave origins of a major northern American city Most Americans believe that slavery was a creature of the South, and that Northern states and territories provided stops on the Underground Railroad for fugitive slaves on their way to Canada. In this paradigm-shifting book, celebrated historian Tiya Miles reveals that slavery was at the heart of the Midwest’s iconic city: Detroit. In this richly researched and eye-opening book, Miles has pieced together the experience of the unfree—both native and African American—in the frontier outpost of Detroit, a place wildly remote yet at the center of national and international conflict. Skillfully assembling fragments of a distant historical record, Miles introduces new historical figures and unearths struggles that remained hidden from view until now. The result is fascinating history, little explored and eloquently told, of the limits of freedom in early America, one that adds new layers of complexity to the story of a place that exerts a strong fascination in the media and among public intellectuals, artists, and activists. A book that opens the door on a completely hidden past, The Dawn of Detroit is a powerful and elegantly written history, one that completely changes our understanding of slavery’s American legacy.

The Dawn of Detroit

A Chronicle of Slavery and Freedom in the City of the Straits

Author: Tiya Miles

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781620974810

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 9738

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2018 American Book Award Winner 2018 Frederick Douglass Book Prize Finalist Longlisted for the 2018 Cundill History Prize 2018 Nominee for the Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Legacy Award (Nonfiction) 2018 Merle Curti Social History Award Winner 2018 James A. Rawley Prize Co-Winner A New York Times Editor's Choice selection A Michigan Notable Book of 2018 A Booklist Editors' Choice Title for 2017 "If many Americans imagine slavery essentially as a system in which black men toiled on cotton plantations, Miles upends that stereotype several times over." --New York Times Book Review "[Miles] has compiled documentation that does for Detroit what the Works Progress Administration and the Federal Writers' Project slave narratives did for other regions, primarily the South." --Washington Post "[Tiya Miles] is among the best when it comes to blending artful storytelling with an unwavering sense of social justice." --Martha S. Jones in The Chronicle of Higher Education "A necessary work of powerful, probing scholarship." --Publisher Weekly (starred) "A book likely to stand at the head of further research into the problem of Native and African-American slavery in the north country." --Kirkus Reviews From the MacArthur genius grant winner, a beautifully written and revelatory look at the slave origins of a major northern American city Most Americans believe that slavery was a creature of the South, and that Northern states and territories provided stops on the Underground Railroad for fugitive slaves on their way to Canada. In this paradigm-shifting book, celebrated historian Tiya Miles reveals that slavery was at the heart of the Midwest's iconic city: Detroit. In this richly researched and eye-opening book, Miles has pieced together the experience of the unfree--both native and African American--in the frontier outpost of Detroit, a place wildly remote yet at the center of national and international conflict. Skillfully assembling fragments of a distant historical record, Miles introduces new historical figures and unearths struggles that remained hidden from view until now. The result is fascinating history, little explored and eloquently told, of the limits of freedom in early America, one that adds new layers of complexity to the story of a place that exerts a strong fascination in the media and among public intellectuals, artists, and activists. A book that opens the door on a completely hidden past, The Dawn of Detroit is a powerful and elegantly written history, one that completely changes our understanding of slavery's American legacy.

Dawn of Detroit

A Chronicle of Bondage and Freedom in the City of the Straits

Author: Tiya Miles

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781620972311

Category: Detroit (Mich.)

Page: N.A

View: 5655

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From the MacArthur genius grant winner, a beautifully written and revelatory look at the slave origins of a major northern American city

Detroit

A Motor City History

Author: David Lee Poremba

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439614024

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 9735

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On July 24, 1701, Antoine de La Mothe Cadillac stood in the heart of the wilderness on a bluff overlooking the Detroit River and claimed this frontier in the name of Louis XIV; thus began the story of Detroit, a city marked by pioneering spirits, industrial acumen, and uncommon durability. Over the course of its 300-year history, Detroit has been sculpted into a city unique in the American experience by its extraordinary mixture of diverse cultures: American Indian, French, British, American colonial, and a variety of immigrant newcomers. Detroit: A Motor City History documents the major events that shaped this once-small French fur-trading outpost across three centuries of conflict and prosperity. Through informative text and a variety of imagery, readers experience firsthand the struggles of the nascent village against raiding Indian tribes and the incessant political and military tug of war between the colonial French and English, and then American interests. Like many other major cities across the United States, Detroit played a pivotal role in establishing the country's economic and industrial power in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, serving as a center for its well-known civilian and military mass-production resources. This visual history provides insight into Detroit's rapid evolution from a hamlet into a metropolis against a backdrop of important community and national affairs: the decimating fire of 1805, the War of 1812, the Civil War, the Industrial Revolution, the Great Depression, and both world wars.

Tales from the Haunted South

Dark Tourism and Memories of Slavery from the Civil War Era

Author: Tiya Miles

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469626349

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 9250

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In this book Tiya Miles explores the popular yet troubling phenomenon of "ghost tours," frequently promoted and experienced at plantations, urban manor homes, and cemeteries throughout the South. As a staple of the tours, guides entertain paying customers by routinely relying on stories of enslaved black specters. But who are these ghosts? Examining popular sites and stories from these tours, Miles shows that haunted tales routinely appropriate and skew African American history to produce representations of slavery for commercial gain. "Dark tourism" often highlights the most sensationalist and macabre aspects of slavery, from salacious sexual ties between white masters and black women slaves to the physical abuse and torture of black bodies to the supposedly exotic nature of African spiritual practices. Because the realities of slavery are largely absent from these tours, Miles reveals how they continue to feed problematic "Old South" narratives and erase the hard truths of the Civil War era. In an incisive and engaging work, Miles uses these troubling cases to shine light on how we feel about the Civil War and race, and how the ghosts of the past are still with us.

Detroit's Paradise Valley

Author: Ernest H. Borden

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738531557

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 8639

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One of the most prominent and dynamic African-American neighborhoods in U.S. history, Paradise Valley served as a social and cultural mecca for Detroit's black community from the 1920s through the 1950s. Now the site of stadiums and freeways, the area was once home to places like the Gotham Hotel and the Surf Club, and welcomed the likes of Billie Holiday, Joe Louis, and Sammy Davis Jr. This book uses more than 200 previously unpublished photographs to take readers on a rare tour of the entertainers, entrepreneurs, businesses, and events that made the now-lost Paradise Valley legendary.

The Burden

African Americans and the Enduring Impact of Slavery

Author: Rochelle Riley

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 0814345158

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 200

View: 3348

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Examines the continued emotional, economic, and cultural enslavement of African Americans in the twenty-first century.

The Cherokee Rose

A Novel of Gardens & Ghosts

Author: Tiya Miles

Publisher: John F. Blair, Publisher

ISBN: 0895876353

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 6228

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Written by an award-winning historian and recipient of a recent MacArthur “Genius Grant,” The Cherokee Rose explores territory reminiscent of the bestselling and beloved works of Alice Walker, Octavia Butler, and Louise Erdrich. Now, Tiya Miles's luminous but highly accessible novel examines a little-known aspect of America’s past—slaveholding by Southern Creeks and Cherokees—and its legacy in the lives of three young women who are drawn to the Georgia plantation where scenes of extreme cruelty and equally extraordinary compassion once played out. Based on the author's in-depth and award-winning research into archival sources at the Chief Vann House Historic Site in Chatsworth, Georgia, and the Moravian mission sponsored there in the early 1800s, Miles has blended this fascinating history with a contemporary cast of engaging and memorable characters, including Jinx, the free-spirited historian exploring her tribe’s complicated racial history; Ruth, whose mother sought refuge from a troubled marriage in her beloved garden and the cosmetic empire she built from its bounty; Cheyenne, the Southern black debutante seeking to connect with a meaningful personal history; and, hovering above them all, the spirit of long-gone Mary Ann Battis, a young woman suspected of burning a mission to the ground and then disappearing from tribal records. Together, the women’s discoveries about the secrets of the Cherokee plantation trace their attempts to connect with the strong spirits of the past and reconcile the conflicts in their own lives.

The House on Diamond Hill

A Cherokee Plantation Story

Author: Tiya Miles

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807834181

Category: History

Page: 315

View: 9983

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"Displaying pitch-perfect sensibility that weaves profound human empathy with piercing scholarly critique, Tiya Miles lays open the suffering: of all those who found themselves enmeshed in the world of Diamond Hill. At once monument and memorial, the Vann House is Cherokee, African, and American slavery writ large."--- I AMi: s F. brooks, author of Captives and Cousins: Shivery, kinship, and Community in the Southwest Borderlands "This is one of the most thoughtful, beautifully written works of history on any topic that I have read in a long while. Miles has taken a complex set of issues that have been long obscured by a desire for a romantic and guilt-free past, and with grace and sensitivity, has completely re-written history."--- Leslie M. Harris. Emory University A James Vann, a Cherokee and entrepreneur, established Diamond Hill, the most famous plantation in the southeastern Cherokee Nation. Tiya Miles tells the story of this plantations founding, its flourishing, its takeover by white land-lottery winners on the eve of the Cherokee Removal, its decay, and ultimately its renovation in the 1950s. Indeed, this is the first full-length study to reconstruct the history of the Diamond Hill plantation, a cosmopolitan hub of activity where more than one hundred slaves of African descent lived and labored, contributing significandy to the Vann family's famed wealth. This moving multiracial history sheds light on the various cultural communities that interacted within the plantation boundaries---from elite Cherokee slaveholders to Cherokee subsistence farmers, from black slaves of various ethnic backgrounds to free blacks from the North and South, from German-speaking Moravian missionaries to white southern skilled laborers. Moreover, the book paints rich portraits of the women of these various communities, including Peggy Scott Vann, mistress of Diamond Hill; Pleasant, an enslaved black woman owned by the Moravian Church; and Anna Rosina Gambold, a Moravian missionary diarist. Vividly written and extensively researched, this history illuminates gender, class, and cross-racial relationships on the southern frontier of present-day Georgia.

Black Detroit

A People's History of Self-Determination

Author: Herb Boyd

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062346644

Category: Social Science

Page: 432

View: 4210

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NAACP 2017 Image Award Finalist 2018 Michigan Notable Books honoree The author of Baldwin’s Harlem looks at the evolving culture, politics, economics, and spiritual life of Detroit—a blend of memoir, love letter, history, and clear-eyed reportage that explores the city’s past, present, and future and its significance to the African American legacy and the nation’s fabric. Herb Boyd moved to Detroit in 1943, as race riots were engulfing the city. Though he did not grasp their full significance at the time, this critical moment would be one of many he witnessed that would mold his political activism and exposed a city restless for change. In Black Detroit, he reflects on his life and this landmark place, in search of understanding why Detroit is a special place for black people. Boyd reveals how Black Detroiters were prominent in the city’s historic, groundbreaking union movement and—when given an opportunity—were among the tireless workers who made the automobile industry the center of American industry. Well paying jobs on assembly lines allowed working class Black Detroiters to ascend to the middle class and achieve financial stability, an accomplishment not often attainable in other industries. Boyd makes clear that while many of these middle-class jobs have disappeared, decimating the population and hitting blacks hardest, Detroit survives thanks to the emergence of companies such as Shinola—which represent the strength of the Motor City and and its continued importance to the country. He also brings into focus the major figures who have defined and shaped Detroit, including William Lambert, the great abolitionist, Berry Gordy, the founder of Motown, Coleman Young, the city’s first black mayor, diva songstress Aretha Franklin, Malcolm X, and Ralphe Bunche, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. With a stunning eye for detail and passion for Detroit, Boyd celebrates the music, manufacturing, politics, and culture that make it an American original.

Untold Tales, Unsung Heroes

An Oral History of Detroit's African American Community, 1918-1967

Author: Elaine Latzman Moon

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 9780814324653

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 4612

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Untold Tales, Unsung Heroes is a history of Detroit's African American community told by the men and women who lived it. More than one hundred individuals who lived in Detroit at some time during the period from 1918 to 1967 share stories about ordinary life - families and neighborhoods, community and religious life, school and work. They also describe extraordinary events - the great migration from the South, the depression, World War II, the 1943 race riot, the civil rights movement, the civil disturbance of 1967, and the Vietnam War. Their anecdotal testimonies and reminiscences provide invaluable information about the institutions, lifestyles, relationships, and politics that constitute the social experience of black life in Detroit. The moving, sometimes contradictory views of housekeepers, business owners, factory workers, union organizers, teachers, and corporate executives present a panorama of experiences and perceptions. The tales convey the individual and collective search for equality in education, housing, and employment; struggles against racism; participation in unions and the civil rights movement; and pain and loss that resulted from racial discrimination. By featuring the histories of blacks living in Detroit during the first six decades of the century, this unique oral history contributes immeasurably to our understanding of the development of the city. Arranged chronologically, the book is divided into decades representing significant periods of history in Detroit and in the nation. The period of 1918 to 1927 was marked by mass migration to Detroit, while the country was in the throes of the depression from 1928 to 1937. From 1938 to 1947, World War II and the 1943 race riot profoundly affected the lives of Detroiters. In the decade from 1948 to 1957 the beginnings of civil unrest became apparent. From 1958 to 1967 America was shaken by the upheaval of war and assassination, and Detroit was scarred by the violence of civil disturbance. Previously published histories of Detroit have typically excluded any examination of life in the black community. Untold Tales, Unsung Heroes, however, offers an authentic and personal look at the reality of life among African Americans in the city, bringing to light the perceptions and contributions of true heroes and heroines whose stories have been told here for the first time.

Coleman Young and Detroit Politics

From Social Activist to Power Broker

Author: Wilbur C. Rich

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 9780814320945

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 538

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Coleman Young was elected Detroit's first black mayor in 1973, and was the city's longest-serving chief executive. This volume combines biography with political analysis to outline the basic strategy underlying Young's approach to policy making, and trace the economic changes in the city.

AfterCulture

Detroit and the Humiliation of History

Author: Jerry Herron

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 9780814320716

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 6362

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This is a collection of essays about the making and un-making of middle-class culture, a phenomenon which has occured nowhere more decisively than in America's most representative city, Detroit. The book analyses what has happened since the decline of middle-class culture in Detroit.

Ties That Bind

The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom

Author: Tiya Miles

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520961021

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 6417

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This beautifully written book, now in its second edition, tells the haunting saga of a quintessentially American family. In the late 1790s, Shoe Boots, a famed Cherokee warrior and successful farmer, acquired an African slave named Doll. Over the next thirty years, Shoe Boots and Doll lived together as master and slave and also as lifelong partners who, with their children and grandchildren, experienced key events in American history—including slavery, the Creek War, the founding of the Cherokee Nation and subsequent removal of Native Americans along the Trail of Tears, and the Civil War. This is the gripping story of their lives, in slavery and in freedom. Meticulously crafted from historical and literary sources, Ties That Bind vividly portrays the members of the Shoeboots family. Doll emerges as an especially poignant character, whose life is mostly known through the records of things done to her—her purchase, her marriage, the loss of her children—but also through her moving petition to the federal government for the pension owed to her as Shoe Boots's widow. A sensitive rendition of the hard realities of black slavery within Native American nations, the book provides the fullest picture we have of the myriad complexities, ironies, and tensions among African Americans, Native Americans, and whites in the first half of the nineteenth century. Updated with a new preface and an appendix of key primary sources, this remains an essential book for students of Native American history, African American history, and the history of race and ethnicity in the United States.

The Detroit Almanac

300 Years of Life in the Motor City

Author: Peter Gavrilovich,Bill McGraw

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Detroit (Mich.)

Page: 648

View: 7248

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I've Got a Home in Glory Land

A Lost Tale of the Underground Railroad

Author: Karolyn Smardz Frost

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780374531256

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 480

View: 9253

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Traces the story of former slaves Thornton and Lucie Blackburn, who launched a daring escape from their slave masters in 1831 and became the subjects of a legal dispute between Canada and the United States regarding the Underground Railroad.

AIA Detroit

The American Institute of Architects Guide to Detroit Architecture

Author: Eric J. Hill,John Gallagher,American Institute of Architects. Detroit Chapter

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 9780814331200

Category: Architecture

Page: 359

View: 7853

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A guide to the architecture and landmarks of Detroit provides a series of tours through the city's districts and neighborhoods.

Detroit City Is the Place to Be

The Afterlife of an American Metropolis

Author: Mark Binelli

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0805092293

Category: Architecture

Page: 318

View: 9962

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A Rolling Stone reporter and Detroit native traces the city's demise and recovery efforts, evaluating the ambitious plans of urban developers, speculators, politicians, agriculturalists and utopian environmentalists to transform Detroit into a viable, unsegregated and economically diverse post-industrial region. 50,000 first printing.

Crossing Waters, Crossing Worlds

The African Diaspora in Indian Country

Author: Tiya Miles,Sharon Patricia Holland

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822338659

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 1925

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Collection of essays that explore the complex cultures, identities, and politics that arise in the space where black and native experiences converge.