The Columbia History of the 20th Century

Author: Richard W. Bulliet

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231076296

Category: History

Page: 651

View: 3610

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The book is a series of twenty-three linked interpretive essays on the most significant developments in modern times--ranging from athletics to art, the economy to the environment.

The Columbia History of Twentieth-century French Thought

Author: Lawrence D. Kritzman,Brian J. Reilly,M. B. DeBevoise

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231107907

Category: History

Page: 787

View: 9136

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Unrivaled in its scope and depth, The Columbia History of Twentieth-Century French Thought assesses the intellectual figures, movements, and publications that helped shape and define fields as diverse as history and historiography, psychoanalysis, film, literary theory, cognitive and life sciences, literary criticism, philosophy, and economics. More than two hundred entries by leading intellectuals discuss developments in French thought on such subjects as pacifism, fashion, gastronomy, technology, and urbanism. Contributors include prominent French thinkers, many of whom have played an integral role in the development of French thought, and American, British, and Canadian scholars who have been vital in the dissemination of French ideas.

The Columbia History of Latinos in the United States Since 1960

Author: David G. Gutiérrez

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231508417

Category: Social Science

Page: 512

View: 680

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Latinos are now the largest so-called minority group in the United States—the result of a growth trend that began in the mid-twentieth century—and the influence of Latin cultures on American life is reflected in everything from politics to education to mass cultural forms such as music and television. Yet very few volumes have attempted to analyze or provide a context for this dramatic historical development. The Columbia History of Latinos in the United States Since 1960 is among the few comprehensive histories of Latinos in America. This collaborative, interdisciplinary volume provides not only cutting-edge interpretations of recent Latino history, including essays on the six major immigrant groups (Mexicans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Central Americans, and South Americans), but also insight into the major areas of contention and debate that characterize Latino scholarship in the early twenty-first century. This much-needed book offers a broad overview of this era of explosive demographic and cultural change by exploring the recent histories of all the major national and regional Latino subpopulations and reflecting on what these historical trends might mean for the future of both the United States and the other increasingly connected nations of the Western Hemisphere. While at one point it may have been considered feasible to explore the histories of national populations in isolation from one another, all of the contributors to this volume highlight the deep transnational ties and interconnections that bind different peoples across national and regional lines. Thus, each chapter on Latino national subpopulations explores the ambiguous and shifting boundaries that so loosely define them both in the United States and in their countries of origin. A multinational perspective on important political and cultural themes—such as Latino gender systems, religion, politics, expressive and artistic cultures, and interactions with the law—helps shape a realistic interpretation of the Latino experience in the United States.

The Gold Standard at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Rising Powers, Global Money, and the Age of Empire

Author: Steven Bryan

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231526334

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 7530

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By the end of the nineteenth century, the world was ready to adopt the gold standard out of concerns of national power, prestige, and anti-English competition. Yet although the gold standard allowed countries to enact a virtual single world currency, the years before World War I were not a time of unfettered liberal economics and one-world, one-market harmony. Outside of Europe, the gold standard became a tool for nationalists and protectionists primarily interested in growing domestic industry and imperial expansion. This overlooked trend, provocatively reassessed in Steven Bryan's well-documented history, contradicts our conception of the gold standard as a British-based system infused with English ideas, interests, and institutions. In countries like Japan and Argentina, where nationalist concerns focused on infant-industry protection and the growth of military power, the gold standard enabled the expansion of trade and the goals of the age: industry and empire. Bryan argues that these countries looked less to Britain and more to North America and the rest of Europe for ideological models. Not only does this history challenge our idealistic notions of the prewar period, but it also reorients our understanding of the history that followed. Policymakers of the 1920s latched onto the idea that global prosperity before World War I was the result of a system dominated by English liberalism. Their attempt to reproduce this triumph helped bring about the global downturn, the Great Depression, and the collapse of the interwar world.

The Columbia Companion to the Twentieth-Century American Short Story

Author: Blanche H. Gelfant,Lawrence Graver

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231110995

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 660

View: 3288

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This resource provides information on a popular literary genre - the 20th century American short story. It contains articles on stories that share a particular theme, and over 100 pieces on individual writers and their work. There are also articles on promising new writers entering the scene.

The Columbia Guide to the Vietnam War

Author: David L. Anderson

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231114936

Category: History

Page: 308

View: 9129

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The Vietnam War remains a major point of reference in discussions of U.S. foreign policy and national character. The lessons and legacies of the most divisive event in U.S. history in the twentieth century are hotly debated to this day. Written by a renowned scholar of the conflict, The Columbia Guide to the Vietnam War provides students and researchers with the materials to think seriously about the conflict's many paradoxes and ramifications.

In the Name of Humanity

Reflections on the Twentieth Century

Author: Alain Finkielkraut

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231110204

Category: History

Page: 133

View: 9143

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An unsettling reflection on the twentieth century in its twilight hours in which we are asked to rethink our assumptions about universalism and humanism. While many people look to humanist ideals as a deterrent to nationalist chauvinism, Finkielkraut challenges the abstract idea of universalism by describing the terrible crimes "civilized" Europe has committed in its name.

The Columbia Guide to the Holocaust

Author: Donald L. Niewyk,Francis R. Nicosia

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231528787

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 3982

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Offering a multidimensional approach to one of the most important episodes of the twentieth century, The Columbia Guide to the Holocaust offers readers and researchers a general history of the Holocaust while delving into the core issues and debates in the study of the Holocaust today. Each of the book's five distinct parts stands on its own as valuable research aids; together, they constitute an integrated whole. Part I provides a narrative overview of the Holocaust, placing it within the larger context of Nazi Germany and World War II. Part II examines eight critical issues or controversies in the study of the Holocaust, including the following questions: Were the Jews the sole targets of Nazi genocide, or must other groups, such as homosexuals, the handicapped, Gypsies, and political dissenters, also be included? What are the historical roots of the Holocaust? How and why did the "Final Solution" come about? Why did bystanders extend or withhold aid? Part III consists of a concise chronology of major events and developments that took place surrounding the Holocaust, including the armistice ending World War I, the opening of the first major concentration camp at Dachau, Germany's invasion of Poland, the failed assassination attempt against Hitler, and the formation of Israel. Part IV contains short descriptive articles on more than two hundred key people, places, terms, and institutions central to a thorough understanding of the Holocaust. Entries include Adolf Eichmann, Anne Frank, the Warsaw Ghetto, Aryanization, the SS, Kristallnacht, and the Catholic Church. Part V presents an annotated guide to the best print, video, electronic, and institutional resources in English for further study. Armed with the tools contained in this volume, students or researchers investigating this vast and complicated topic will gain an informed understanding of one of the greatest tragedies in world history.

The Making of Salafism

Islamic Reform in the Twentieth Century

Author: Henri Lauzière

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231540175

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 5468

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Some Islamic scholars hold that Salafism is an innovative and rationalist effort at Islamic reform that emerged in the late nineteenth century but gradually disappeared in the mid twentieth. Others argue Salafism is an anti-innovative and antirationalist movement of Islamic purism that dates back to the medieval period yet persists today. Though they contradict each other, both narratives are considered authoritative, making it hard for outsiders to grasp the history of the ideology and its core beliefs. Introducing a third, empirically based genealogy, The Making of Salafism understands the concept as a recent phenomenon projected back onto the past, and it sees its purist evolution as a direct result of decolonization. Henri Lauzière builds his history on the transnational networks of Taqi al-Din al-Hilali (1894–1987), a Moroccan Salafi who, with his associates, participated in the development of Salafism as both a term and a movement. Traveling from Rabat to Mecca, from Calcutta to Berlin, al-Hilali interacted with high-profile Salafi scholars and activists who eventually abandoned Islamic modernism in favor of a more purist approach to Islam. Today, Salafis tend to claim a monopoly on religious truth and freely confront other Muslims on theological and legal issues. Lauzière's pathbreaking history recognizes the social forces behind this purist turn, uncovering the popular origins of what has become a global phenomenon.

The Columbia History of Western Philosophy

Author: Richard H. Popkin

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231101295

Category: Philosophy

Page: 836

View: 979

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A chronological survey of the evolution of Western philosophy provides historical analysis of the thought of key figures and schools and explores the broad influence of Jewish, Islamic, and Asian philosophy, the importance of women philosophers, and other topics. UP.

The Columbia Documentary History of the Asian American Experience

Author: Franklin Odo

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231110303

Category: History

Page: 590

View: 5212

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This collection of key documents presents the rich Asian American heritage through primary sources -- speeches, diary entries, editorials, advertisements, court opinions, legislation, songs, and poems -- along with expert, concise editorial commentary. It reflects not only the rapid expansion in the field of Asian American studies in the last decade but also innovative scholarship on Asian Americans from many fields, including western history, feminist studies, political science, anthropology, and military history.

The Forms of Youth

Twentieth-century Poetry and Adolescence

Author: Stephen Burt

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231141424

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 263

View: 4952

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Early in the twentieth century, Americans and other English-speaking nations began to regard adolescence as a separate phase of life. Associated with uncertainty, inwardness, instability, and sexual energy, adolescence acquired its own tastes, habits, subcultures, slang, economic interests, and art forms. This new idea of adolescence became the driving force behind some of the modern era's most original poetry. Stephen Burt demonstrates how adolescence supplied the inspiration, and at times the formal principles, on which many twentieth-century poets founded their works. William Carlos Williams and his contemporaries fashioned their American verse in response to the idealization of new kinds of youth in the 1910s and 1920s. W. H. Auden's early work, Philip Larkin's verse, Thom Gunn's transatlantic poetry, and Basil Bunting's late-modernist masterpiece, Briggflatts, all track the development of adolescence in Britain as it moved from the private space of elite schools to the urban public space of sixties subcultures. The diversity of American poetry from the Second World War to the end of the sixties illuminates poets' reactions to the idea that teenagers, juvenile delinquents, hippies, and student radicals might, for better or worse, transform the nation. George Oppen, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Robert Lowell in particular built and rebuilt their sixties styles in reaction to changing concepts of youth. Contemporary poets continue to fashion new ideas of youth. Laura Kasischke and Jorie Graham focus on the discoveries of a specifically female adolescence. The Irish poet Paul Muldoon and the Australian poet John Tranter use teenage perspectives to represent a postmodernist uncertainty. Other poets have rejected traditional and modern ideas of adolescence, preferring instead to view this age as a reflection of the uncertainties and restricted tastes of the way we live now. The first comprehensive study of adolescence in twentieth-century poetry, The Forms of Youth recasts the history of how English-speaking cultures began to view this phase of life as a valuable state of consciousness, if not the very essence of a Western identity.

The Science of Chinese Buddhism

Early Twentieth-Century Engagements

Author: Erik J. Hammerstrom

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231539584

Category: Religion

Page: 272

View: 458

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Kexue, or science, captured the Chinese imagination in the early twentieth century, promising new knowledge about the world and a dynamic path to prosperity. Chinese Buddhists embraced scientific language and ideas to carve out a place for their religion within a rapidly modernizing society. Examining dozens of previously unstudied writings from the Chinese Buddhist press, this book maps Buddhists' efforts to rethink their traditions through science in the initial decades of the twentieth century. Buddhists believed science offered an exciting, alternative route to knowledge grounded in empirical thought, much like their own. They encouraged young scholars to study subatomic and relativistic physics while still maintaining Buddhism's vital illumination of human nature and its crucial support of an ethical system rooted in radical egalitarianism. Showcasing the rich and progressive steps Chinese religious scholars took in adapting to science's rising authority, this volume offers a key perspective on how a major Eastern power transitioned to modernity in the twentieth century and how its intellectuals anticipated many of the ideas debated by scholars of science and Buddhism today.

The Columbia Anthology of American Poetry

Author: Jay Parini,Axinn Professor of English Jay Parini

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231081221

Category: Poetry

Page: 757

View: 3069

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A respected American poet and critic offers an authoritative survey of all major American poets--from colonial to contemporary--and selections from lesser-known poets, including women, Native Americans, and African Americans of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. UP.

The Columbia History of Chinese Literature

Author: Victor H. Mair

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231528511

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1368

View: 5311

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The Columbia History of Chinese Literature is a comprehensive yet portable guide to China's vast literary traditions. Stretching from earliest times to the present, the text features original contributions by leading specialists working in all genres and periods. Chapters cover poetry, prose, fiction, and drama, and consider such contextual subjects as popular culture, the impact of religion, the role of women, and China's relationship with non-Sinitic languages and peoples. Opening with a major section on the linguistic and intellectual foundations of Chinese literature, the anthology traces the development of forms and movements over time, along with critical trends, and pays particular attention to the premodern canon.

The Playful Crowd

Pleasure Places in the Twentieth Century

Author: Gary S. Cross,John K. Walton

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231127243

Category: Travel

Page: 308

View: 3084

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From "Sodoms by the sea" at Coney Island and Blackpool to carefully orchestrated corporate entertainment, The Playful Crowd compares the pursuit of pleasure on both sides of the Atlantic. The authors capture the gritty vulgarity and charms of Coney Island and Blackpool and examine how Disneyland and Beamish, a heritage park that celebrates Britain's industrial and social history, evoke certain types of nostalgia.

The Metamorphoses of Fat

A History of Obesity

Author: Georges Vigarello,C. Jon Delogu

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231159765

Category: History

Page: 261

View: 7033

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Georges Vigarello maps the evolution of Western ideas about fat and fat people from the Middle Ages to the present, paying particular attention to the role of science, fashion, fitness crazes, and public health campaigns in shaping these views. While hefty bodies were once a sign of power, today those who struggle to lose weight are considered poor in character and weak in mind. Vigarello traces the eventual equation of fatness with infirmity and the way we have come to define ourselves and others in terms of body type. Vigarello begins with the medieval artists and intellectuals who treated heavy bodies as symbols of force and prosperity. He then follows the shift during the Renaissance and early modern period to courtly, medical, and religious codes that increasingly favored moderation and discouraged excess. Scientific advances in the eighteenth century also brought greater knowledge of food and the body's processes, recasting fatness as the "relaxed" antithesis of health. The body-as-mechanism metaphor intensified in the early nineteenth century, with the chemistry revolution and heightened attention to food-as-fuel, which turned the body into a kind of furnace or engine. During this period, social attitudes toward fat became conflicted, with the bourgeois male belly operating as a sign of prestige but also as a symbol of greed and exploitation, while the overweight female was admired only if she was working class. Vigarello concludes with the fitness and body-conscious movements of the twentieth century and the proliferation of personal confessions about obesity, which tied fat more closely to notions of personality, politics, taste, and class.