Society, Manners and Politics

In the United States, Being a Series of Letters on North America

Author: Michel Chevalier,Thomas Bradford

Publisher: Applewood Books

ISBN: 1429002077

Category: Travel

Page: 467

View: 4669

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Published in the United States in 1839, the letters of French political economist Michel Chevalier made note of the economic constructs of America, comparing the democratic model he found in the U.S. to the aristocratic model more prevalent in Europe. Chevalier focused his attention on work in America-on the centrality of employment to American culture and politics, and how work, rather than class, gave the American his place in society. He also made note of forms of transportation, particularly railroads, as well as of slavery, banking, and the policies of Andrew Jackson.

In this Remote Country

French Colonial Culture in the Anglo-American Imagination, 1780-1860

Author: Edward Watts

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807857625

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 275

View: 8489

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When Anglo-Americans looked west after the Revolution, they hoped to see a blank slate upon which to build their continental republic. However, French settlers had inhabited the territory stretching from Ohio to Oregon for over a century, blending into Na

Religion in America

A Political History

Author: Denis Lacorne

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231526407

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 1878

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Denis Lacorne identifies two competing narratives defining the American identity. The first narrative, derived from the philosophy of the Enlightenment, is essentially secular. Associated with the Founding Fathers and reflected in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Federalist Papers, this line of reasoning is predicated on separating religion from politics to preserve political freedom from an overpowering church. Prominent thinkers such as Voltaire, Thomas Paine, and Jean-Nicolas Démeunier, who viewed the American project as a radical attempt to create a new regime free from religion and the weight of ancient history, embraced this American effort to establish a genuine "wall of separation" between church and state. The second narrative is based on the premise that religion is a fundamental part of the American identity and emphasizes the importance of the original settlement of America by New England Puritans. This alternative vision was elaborated by Whig politicians and Romantic historians in the first half of the nineteenth century. It is still shared by modern political scientists such as Samuel Huntington. These thinkers insist America possesses a core, stable "Creed" mixing Protestant and republican values. Lacorne outlines the role of religion in the making of these narratives and examines, against this backdrop, how key historians, philosophers, novelists, and intellectuals situate religion in American politics.

Most Uncommon Jacksonians

The Radical Leaders of the Early Labor Movement

Author: Edward Pessen

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438415956

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 7953

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The age of Jackson saw the beginnings of America’s labor movement in the emergence both of trade unions and of the Working Men’s political parties. The leadership of this movement was one of its most outstanding and fascinating features. These radical leaders were “uncommon Jacksonians” in that they stood apart from both main currents of their day—the optimistic pursuit of material gain, and the moralistic criticism of that pursuit by traditionalists. They advocated a different, if minority, ideology, and it is this ideology that is Professor Pessen’s major concern in this book. The labor spokesmen were as diverse and complex as the movement they led. Some were employers rather than laborers and even the union leaders included men who had never actually soiled their hands in manual toil. In a sense these leaders were middle-class idealists interested in every variety of reform. They were drawn to labor largely because they believed it the most productive as well as the most victimized group in American society. For all their differences, however, the leaders’ social views were strikingly similar. They saw America as a class society dominated by the wealthy in general, capitalists in particular, with the control of government and the courts in the hands of the rich. Their picture of the contemporary social landscape was one marked by the poverty of the masses and vast disparities in wealth, power, and prestige. Greatly influenced by English radical thought, they rejected the Malthusian dictum that the poor were responsible for their own misery. They fixed the blame instead on a number of social institutions, the chief villain of which was private property. Without using the word “socialism,” the leaders’ vision of the good society was one in which no man profited from the labor of another, and the guiding principle was “to each according to his deeds.” Though a complex and often inconsistent phenomenon, the political movement represented by the early Working Men’s Parties was an authentic expression of labor’s views, Professor Pessen believes. This study challenges the legend that organized labor enthusiastically supported Jackson, and the longstanding myth that American labor movements have characteristically been conservative. Most Uncommon Jacksonians adds new perspectives to the history of American social thought.

The Civil War Soldier

A Historical Reader

Author: Larry M. Logue

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814798799

Category: History

Page: 515

View: 6176

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An anthology of twenty-seven selections combines nineteenth-century battlefield accounts of the Civil War with past and contemporary scholarship to offer a broad perspective on the soldiers' total experience.

The Materials of Exchange between Britain and North East America, 1750-1900

Author: Assoc Prof Daniel Maudlin,Assoc Prof Robin Peel

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409462455

Category: History

Page: 242

View: 9855

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Taking a multidisciplinary approach to the complex cultural exchanges that took place between Britain and America from 1750 to 1900, The Materials of Exchange examines material, visual, and print culture alongside literature within a transatlantic context. The contributors trace the evolution of Anglo-American culture from its origins as a product of the British North Atlantic Empire through to its persistence in the post-Independence world of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. While transatlanticism is a well-established field in history and literary studies, this volume recognizes the wider diversity and interactions of transatlantic cultural production across material and visual cultures as well as literature. As such, while encompassing a range of fields and approaches within the humanities, the ten chapters are all concerned with understanding and interpreting the same Anglo-American culture within the same social contexts. The chapters integrate the literary with the material, offering alternative and provocative perspectives on topics ranging from the child-made book to representations of domestic slaves in literature, by way of history painting, travel writing, architecture and political plays. By focusing on cultural exchanges between Britain and the north-eastern maritime United States over nearly two centuries, the collection offers an in-depth study of Britain’s relationship with a single region of North America over an extended historic period. Contributors have resisted the temptation to prioritize the relationship between New England and England in particular by placing this association within the contexts of Atlantic exchanges with other northeastern states as well as with the South, the Caribbean and Scotland. Intended for researchers in literature, visual and material culture, this collection challenges single-subject boundaries by redefining transatlantic studies as the collective examination of the complex and interrelated cultural transactions that crisscrossed the Atlantic through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

The Archaeology of Gender

Separating the Spheres in Urban America

Author: Diana diZerga Wall

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 148991210X

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 5387

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Historical archaeologists often become so involved in their potsherd patterns they seldom have time or energy left to address the broader processes responsi ble for the material culture patterns they recognize. Some ofus haveurged our colleagues to use the historical record as a springboard from which to launch hypotheses with which to better understand the behavioral and cultural pro cesses responsible for the archaeological record. Toooften, this urging has re sulted in reports designed like a sandwich, having a slice of "historical back ground," followed by a totally different "archaeological record," and closed with a weevil-ridden slice of "interpretation" of questionable nutritive value for understanding the past. The reader is often left to wonder what the archae ological meat had to do with either slice of bread, since the connection be tween the documented history and the material culture is left to the reader's imagination, and the connection between the interpretation and the other disparate parts is tenuous at best. The plethora of stale archaeological sandwiches in the literature has re sulted at the methodological level from a too-narrow focus on the specific history and archaeology ofa site and the individuals involvedon it, rather than a focus on the explanation of broader processes of culture to which the actors and events at the site-specific level responded.

The Fall of the House of Labor

The Workplace, the State, and American Labor Activism, 1865-1925

Author: David Montgomery

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521379823

Category: History

Page: 494

View: 2780

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Traces the labor movement from the end of the Civil War to the 1920s, and looks at the relationships between workers of different ethnic backgrounds

An Ordered Love

Sex Roles and Sexuality in Victorian Utopias--The Shakers, the Mormons, and the Oneida Community

Author: Louis J. Kern

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469620421

Category: History

Page: 445

View: 2453

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An Ordered Love is the first detailed study of sex roles in the utopian communities that proposed alternatives to monogamous marriage: The Shakers (1779-1890), the Mormons (1843-90), and the Oneida Community (1848-79). The lives of men and women changed substantially when they joined one of the utopian communities. Louis J. Kern challenges the commonly held belief that Mormon polygamy was uniformly downgrading to women and that Oneida pantagamy and Shaker celibacy were liberating for them. Rather, Kern asserts that changes in sexual behavior and roles for women occurred in ideological environments that assumed women were inferior and needed male guidance. An elemental distrust of women denied the Victorian belief in their moral superiority, attacked the sanctity of the maternal role, and institutionalized the dominance of men over women. These utopias accepted the revolutionary idea that the pleasure bond was the essence of marriage. They provided their members with a highly developed theological and ideological position that helped them cope with the ambiguities and anxieties they felt during a difficult transitional stage in social mores. Analysis of the theological doctrines of these communities indicates how pervasive sexual questions were in the minds of the utopians and how closely they were related to both reform (social perfection) and salvation (individual perfection). These communities saw sex as the point at which the demands of individual selfishness and the social requirements of self-sacrifice were in most open conflict. They did not offer their members sexual license, but rather they established ideals of sexual orderliness and moral stability and sought to provide a refuge from the rampant sexual anxieties of Victorian culture. Kern examines the critical importance of considerations of sexuality and sexual behavior in these communities, recognizing their value as indications of larger social and cultural tensions. Using the insights of history, psychology, and sociology, he investigates the relationships between the individual and society, ideology and behavior, and thought and action as expressed in the sexual life of these three communities. Previously unused manuscript sources on the Oneida Community and Shaker journals and daybooks reveal interesting and sometimes startling information on sexual behavior and attitudes.

A Social History of Books and Libraries from Cuneiform to Bytes

Author: Patrick M. Valentine

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 0810885719

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 222

View: 4443

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A Social History of Books and Libraries from Cuneiform to Bytes traces the roles of books and libraries throughout recorded history and explores their social and cultural importance within differing societies and changing times. It presents the history of books from clay tablets to e-books and the history of libraries, whether built of bricks or bytes.

Chop Suey, USA

The Story of Chinese Food in America

Author: Yong Chen

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231538162

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 3961

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American diners began to flock to Chinese restaurants more than a century ago, making Chinese food the first mass-consumed cuisine in the United States. By 1980, it had become the country's most popular ethnic cuisine. Chop Suey, USA offers the first comprehensive interpretation of the rise of Chinese food, revealing the forces that made it ubiquitous in the American gastronomic landscape and turned the country into an empire of consumption. Engineered by a politically disenfranchised, numerically small, and economically exploited group, Chinese food's tour de America is an epic story of global cultural encounter. It reflects not only changes in taste but also a growing appetite for a more leisurely lifestyle. Americans fell in love with Chinese food not because of its gastronomic excellence but because of its affordability and convenience, which is why they preferred the quick and simple dishes of China while shunning its haute cuisine. Epitomized by chop suey, American Chinese food was a forerunner of McDonald's, democratizing the once-exclusive dining-out experience for such groups as marginalized Anglos, African Americans, and Jews. The rise of Chinese food is also a classic American story of immigrant entrepreneurship and perseverance. Barred from many occupations, Chinese Americans successfully turned Chinese food from a despised cuisine into a dominant force in the restaurant market, creating a critical lifeline for their community. Chinese American restaurant workers developed the concept of the open kitchen and popularized the practice of home delivery. They streamlined certain Chinese dishes, such as chop suey and egg foo young, turning them into nationally recognized brand names.

The Rites of Assent

Transformations in the Symbolic Construction of America

Author: Sacvan Bercovitch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317796187

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 432

View: 6435

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The Rites of Assent examines the cultural strategies through which "America" served as a vehicle simultaneously for diversity and cohesion, fusion and fragmentation. Taking an ethnographic, cross-cultural approach, The Rites of Assent traces the meanings and purposes of "America" back to the colonial typology of mission, and specifically (in chapters on Puritan rhetoric, Cotton Mather, Jonathan Edwards, and the movement from Revival to Revolution) to the legacy of early New England.

Roots of American Economic Growth 1607-1861

An Essay on Social Causation

Author: Stuart Bruchey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136615628

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 232

View: 8274

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First Published in 2005. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Civilized America

Author: Thomas Colley Grattan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108033245

Category: History

Page: 532

View: 6252

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Laudatory and disparaging, detailed and usefully general, of political centers and societal margins, these volumes vividly illustrate nineteenth-century America. Sharing eyewitness accounts and moral reflections, Volume 2 discusses the Irish, women, and Native Americans, and it criticizes the South's slave-based economy and society even though racism colors its reflections.

The Stranger in America

Comprising Sketches of the Manners, Society, and National Peculiarities of the United States, in a Series of Letters to a Friend in Europe

Author: Francis Lieber

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 7331

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