Reinventing the Enemy's Language

Contemporary Native Women's Writing of North America

Author: Joy Harjo,Gloria Bird

Publisher: W. W. Norton

ISBN: 9780393318289

Category: Fiction

Page: 576

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Features poetry, fiction, and other writings by Native American women

Family Tree

Author: Joaquin Zihuatanejo

Publisher: BookBaby

ISBN: 1623090857

Category: Poetry

Page: 78

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Family Tree is the new collection of poems from award winning poet, Joaquin Zihuatanejo. This collection is a testimony of life and love that follows the journey of one barrio boy from street kid to street poet. These poems and stories vividly capture the essence of what it is to grow from a boy with dirty face who found refuge in a world of stories and poems to an award winning teacher and poet.

The Routledge Companion to Native American Literature

Author: Deborah L. Madsen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317693183

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 524

View: 8481

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The Routledge Companion to Native American Literature engages the multiple scenes of tension — historical, political, cultural, and aesthetic — that constitutes a problematic legacy in terms of community identity, ethnicity, gender and sexuality, language, and sovereignty in the study of Native American literature. This important and timely addition to the field provides context for issues that enter into Native American literary texts through allusions, references, and language use. The volume presents over forty essays by leading and emerging international scholars and analyses: regional, cultural, racial and sexual identities in Native American literature key historical moments from the earliest period of colonial contact to the present worldviews in relation to issues such as health, spirituality, animals, and physical environments traditions of cultural creation that are key to understanding the styles, allusions, and language of Native American Literature the impact of differing literary forms of Native American literature. This collection provides a map of the critical issues central to the discipline, as well as uncovering new perspectives and new directions for the development of the field. It supports academic study and also assists general readers who require a comprehensive yet manageable introduction to the contexts essential to approaching Native American Literature. It is essential reading for anyone interested in the past, present and future of this literary culture. Contributors: Joseph Bauerkemper, Susan Bernardin, Susan Berry Brill de Ramírez, Kirby Brown, David J. Carlson, Cari M. Carpenter, Eric Cheyfitz, Tova Cooper, Alicia Cox, Birgit Däwes, Janet Fiskio, Earl E. Fitz, John Gamber, Kathryn N. Gray, Sarah Henzi, Susannah Hopson, Hsinya Huang, Brian K. Hudson, Bruce E. Johansen, Judit Ágnes Kádár, Amelia V. Katanski, Susan Kollin, Chris LaLonde, A. Robert Lee, Iping Liang, Drew Lopenzina, Brandy N?lani McDougall, Deborah Madsen, Diveena Seshetta Marcus, Sabine N. Meyer, Carol Miller, David L. Moore, Birgit Brander Rasmussen, Mark Rifkin, Kenneth M. Roemer, Oliver Scheiding, Lee Schweninger, Stephanie A. Sellers, Kathryn W. Shanley, Leah Sneider, David Stirrup, Theodore C. Van Alst, Jr., Tammy Wahpeconiah

The Columbia Guide to American Indian Literatures of the United States Since 1945

Author: Eric Cheyfitz

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231117647

Category: Art

Page: 438

View: 9030

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The Columbia Guide to American Indian Literatures of the United States Since 1945 is the first major volume of its kind to focus on Native literatures in a postcolonial context. Written by a team of noted Native and non-Native scholars, these essays consider the complex social and political influences that have shaped American Indian literatures in the second half of the twentieth century, with particular emphasis on core themes of identity, sovereignty, and land. In his essay comprising part I of the volume, Eric Cheyfitz argues persuasively for the necessary conjunction of Indian literatures and federal Indian law from Apess to Alexie. Part II is a comprehensive survey of five genres of literature: fiction (Arnold Krupat and Michael Elliott), poetry (Kimberly Blaeser), drama (Shari Huhndorf), nonfiction (David Murray), and autobiography (Kendall Johnson), and discusses the work of Vine Deloria Jr., N. Scott Momaday, Joy Harjo, Simon Ortiz, Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, Gerald Vizenor, Jimmy Santiago Baca, and Sherman Alexie, among many others. Drawing on historical and theoretical frameworks, the contributors examine how American Indian writers and critics have responded to major developments in American Indian life and how recent trends in Native writing build upon and integrate traditional modes of storytelling. Sure to be considered a groundbreaking contribution to the field, The Columbia Guide to American Indian Literatures of the United States Since 1945 offers both a rich critique of history and a wealth of new information and insight.

Mapping Indigenous Presence

North Scandinavian and North American Perspectives

Author: Kathryn W. Shanley,Bjørg Evjen

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816531528

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 7623

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Mapping Indigenous Presence presents a set of comparativeIndigenous studies essays with contemporary perspectives, attesting tothe importance of the roles Indigenous people have played as overseersof their own lands and resources, as creators of their own culturalrichness, and as political entities capable of governing themselves.This interdisciplinary collection explores the Indigenous experience ofS�mi peoples of Norway and Native Americans of Montana in theirrespective contexts--yet they are in many ways distinctlydifferent within the body politic of their respective countries.Although they share similarities as Indigenous peoples withinnation-states and inhabit somewhat similar geographies, their culturesand histories differ significantly.

Where Clouds are Formed

Poems

Author: Ofelia Zepeda

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816527786

Category: Poetry

Page: 75

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A Native American poet explores aspects of language, American Indian culture, and the land.

Soul Talk, Song Language

Conversations with Joy Harjo

Author: Joy Harjo,Tanaya Winder

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819571512

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 164

View: 9993

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Joy Harjo is a “poet-healer-philosopher-saxophonist,” and one of the most powerful Native American voices of her generation. She has spent the past two decades exploring her place in poetry, music, dance/performance, and art. Soul Talk, Song Language gathers together in one complete collection many of these explorations and conversations. Through an eclectic assortment of media, including personal essays, interviews, and newspaper columns, Harjo reflects upon the nuances and development of her art, the importance of her origins, and the arduous reconstructions of the tribal past, as well as the dramatic confrontation between Native American and Anglo civilizations. Harjo takes us on a journey into her identity as a woman and an artist, poised between poetry and music, encompassing tribal heritage and reassessments and comparisons with the American cultural patrimony. She presents herself in an exquisitely literary context that is rooted in ritual and ceremony and veers over the edge where language becomes music.

Engaged Resistance

American Indian Art, Literature, and Film from Alcatraz to the NMAI

Author: Dean Rader

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292723997

Category: Social Science

Page: 253

View: 8463

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From Sherman Alexie's films to the poetry and fiction of Louise Erdrich and Leslie Marmon Silko to the paintings of Jaune Quick-To-See Smith and the sculpture of Edgar Heap of Birds, Native American movies, literature, and art have become increasingly influential, garnering critical praise and enjoying mainstream popularity. Recognizing that the time has come for a critical assessment of this exceptional artistic output and its significance to American Indian and American issues, Dean Rader offers the first interdisciplinary examination of how American Indian artists, filmmakers, and writers tell their own stories. Beginning with rarely seen photographs, documents, and paintings from the Alcatraz Occupation in 1969 and closing with an innovative reading of the National Museum of the American Indian, Rader initiates a conversation about how Native Americans have turned to artistic expression as a means of articulating cultural sovereignty, autonomy, and survival. Focusing on figures such as author/director Sherman Alexie (Flight, Face, and Smoke Signals), artist Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, director Chris Eyre (Skins), author Louise Erdrich (Jacklight, The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse), sculptor Edgar Heap of Birds, novelist Leslie Marmon Silko, sculptor Allen Houser, filmmaker and actress Valerie Red Horse, and other writers including Joy Harjo, LeAnne Howe, and David Treuer, Rader shows how these artists use aesthetic expression as a means of both engagement with and resistance to the dominant U.S. culture. Raising a constellation of new questions about Native cultural production, Rader greatly increases our understanding of what aesthetic modes of resistance can accomplish that legal or political actions cannot, as well as why Native peoples are turning to creative forms of resistance to assert deeply held ethical values.

The Desert Remembers My Name

On Family and Writing

Author: Kathleen Alcal‡

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816526277

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 204

View: 5111

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My parents always told me I was Mexican. I was Mexican because they were Mexican. This was sometimes modified to ÒMexican American,Ó since I was born in California, and thus automatically a U.S. citizen. But, my parents said, this, too, was once part of Mexico. My father would say this with a sweeping gesture, taking in the smog, the beautiful mountains, the cars and houses and fast-food franchises. When he made that gesture, all was cleared away in my mindÕs eye to leave the hazy impression of a better place. We were here when the white people came, the Spaniards, then the Americans. And we will be here when they go away, he would say, and it will be part of Mexico again. Thus begins a lyrical and entirely absorbing collection of personal essays by esteemed Chicana writer and gifted storyteller Kathleen Alcal‡. Loosely linked by an exploration of the many meanings of Òfamily,Ó these essays move in a broad arc from the stories and experiences of those close to her to those whom she wonders about, like Andrea Yates, a mother who drowned her children. In the process of digging and sifting, she is frequently surprised by what she unearths. Her family, she discovers, were Jewish refugees from the Spanish Inquisition who took on the trappings of Catholicism in order to survive. Although the essays are in many ways personal, they are also universal. When she examines her family history, she is encouraging us to inspect our own families, too. When she investigates a family secret, she is supporting our own search for meaning. And when she writes that being separated from our indigenous culture is Òa form of illiteracy,Ó we know exactly what she means. After reading these essays, we find that we have discovered not only why Kathleen Alcal‡ is a writer but also why we appreciate her so much. She helps us to find ourselves.

Word

On Being a [woman] Writer

Author: Jocelyn Burrell

Publisher: Feminist Press at CUNY

ISBN: 9781558614673

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 223

View: 6409

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A stunning array of women writers from the U.S. and abroad examine the intimate and politically charged act of writing.

First Fish, First People

Salmon Tales of the North Pacific Rim

Author: Judith Roche,Meg McHutchison

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 9780774806862

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 199

View: 8055

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First Fish, First People brings together writers from two continents and four countries whose traditional cultures are based on Pacific wild salmon: Ainu from Japan; Ulchi and Nyvkh from Siberia; Okanagan and Coast Salish from Canada; and Makah, Warm Springs, and Spokane from the United States remember the blessedness and mourn the loss of the wild salmon while alerting us to current environmental dangers and conditions. The text is enhanced by traditional designs from each nation and photographs, both contemporary and historical, as well as personal family pictures from the writers. Together, words and images offer a prayer that our precious remaining wild salmon will increase and flourish.

Reading Native American Literature

Author: Joseph L. Coulombe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136839593

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 2427

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In this volume, Joseph Coulombe argues that Native American writers use diverse narrative strategies to engage with readers and are ‘writing for connection’ with both Native and non-Native audiences.

The Poetry and Poetics of Gerald Vizenor

Author: Deborah L. Madsen

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 0826352499

Category: LITERARY CRITICISM

Page: 253

View: 3242

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The first book devoted exclusively to the poetry and literary aesthetics of one of Native America’s most accomplished writers, this collection of essays brings together detailed critical analyses of single texts and individual poetry collections from diverse theoretical perspectives, along with comparative discussions of Vizenor’s related works. Contributors discuss Vizenor’s philosophy of poetic expression, his innovations in diverse poetic genres, and the dynamic interrelationships between Vizenor’s poetry and his prose writings. Throughout his poetic career Vizenor has returned to common tropes, themes, and structures. Indeed, it is difficult to distinguish clearly his work in poetry from his prose, fiction, and drama. The essays gathered in this collection offer powerful evidence of the continuing influence of Anishinaabe dream songs and the haiku form in Vizenor’s novels, stories, and theoretical essays; this influence is most obvious at the level of grammatical structure and imagistic composition but can also be discerned in terms of themes and issues to which Vizenor continues to return.

The People Who Stayed

Southeastern Indian Writing After Removal

Author: Janet McAdams,Geary Hobson,Kathryn Walkiewicz

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806185759

Category: History

Page: 404

View: 4290

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The two-hundred-year-old myth of the “vanishing” American Indian still holds some credence in the American Southeast, the region from which tens of thousands of Indians were relocated after passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830. Yet, as the editors of this volume amply demonstrate, a significant Indian population remained behind after those massive relocations. The first anthology to focus on the literary work of Native Americans who trace their ancestry to “people who stayed” in southeastern states after 1830, this volume represents every state and every genre, including short stories, excerpts from novels, poetry, essays, plays, and even Web postings. Although most works are contemporary, the collection covers the entire post-Removal era. Some of the contributors are well known, while others have only recently emerged as important literary voices. All of the writers in The People Who Stayed affirm their Indian ancestry, though many live outside the Southeast today. As this anthology demonstrates, indigenous Southeastern writing engages the local and the global, the traditional and the modern. While many speak to the prospects and perils of acculturation, all the writers bear witness to the ways, oblique or straightforward, that they and their families continue to honor their Indian identities despite the legacy of removal. In an introduction to the volume and in headnotes on each contributor, the editors provide historical context and literary insight on the diversity of writing and lived experiences found in these pages. All readers, from students to scholars, will gain newfound understanding of the literature — and the human experience — of Native people of the American Southeast.

Each and Her

Author: Valerie Mart’nez

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816528592

Category: Poetry

Page: 78

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A collection of poems by Valerie Martínez inspired by the murders of over 450 girls and women in the cities of Juárez and Chihuahua, Mexico, since 1993.

This Giving Birth

Pregnancy and Childbirth in American Women's Writing

Author: Julie Ann Tharp,Susan MacCallum-Whitcomb

Publisher: Popular Press

ISBN: 9780879728083

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 175

View: 2759

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Compelling essays which underline the central place pregnancy and childbirth hold in women’s writing. Embracing three centuries of prose and poetry, the anthology traces the evolution of American maternity literature, exploring the difficulties mothers faced as they struggled to transform themselves from objects into maternal subjects. Women as diverse as Anne Bradstreet, Anne Sexton, Sharon Olds, Kate Chopin, Toni Morrison, and Louise Erdrich all labored to reclaim the birthing process by giving voice to experiences and emotions long devalued by a patriarchal culture. Their voices resonate throughout this collection.

And They Called it Horizon

Santa Fe Poems

Author: Valerie Martínez

Publisher: Sunstone Press

ISBN: 0865347905

Category: Poetry

Page: 114

View: 9093

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During her two-year tenure as Santa Fe's Poet Laureate, award-winning poet Martinez wrote about her experience--occasional poems, meditations, narratives, and lyric poems that capture the present and past of the capital city and its people, all collected in this volume.

Dhuuluu-Yala

To Talk Straight - Publishing Indigenous Literature

Author: Anita Heiss

Publisher: Aboriginal Studies Press

ISBN: 0855754443

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 5860

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Dhuuluu-Yala is a Wiradjuri phrase meaning 'to talk straight' and this book is straight talk about publishing Indigenous literature in Australia. It also includes broader issues that writers need to consider: engaging with readers and reviewers. The book covers the period up to the mid-1900s, though some references are included up to 2000. Changes have been made since that date, however the issues identified in "Dhuuluu-Yala" remain current and to a large extent unresolved. The history of defining Aboriginality in Australia and the experience of being Aboriginal have both impacted on the production of Aboriginal writing today. These twin themes are the major focus of the book. The pioneering roles of Aboriginal writers who have gone before and created a space has allowed for the growth of an Indigenous publishing industry. Indeed, a literary and publishing culture have developed also because of the increasing desire and need for an authentic Indigenous voice in Australian literature. Although funding and other mechanisms are in place and possibilities afforded Indigenous writers have improved, opportunities are still limited, leading to some authors choosing to self-publish.

Transformation Now!

Toward a Post-Oppositional Politics of Change

Author: AnaLouise Keating

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252095111

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 2335

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In this lively, thought-provoking study, AnaLouise Keating writes in the traditions of radical U.S. women-of-color feminist/womanist thought and queer studies, inviting us to transform how we think about identity, difference, social justice and social change, metaphysics, reading, and teaching. Through detailed investigations of women of color theories and writings, indigenous thought, and her own personal and pedagogical experiences, Keating develops transformative modes of engagement that move through oppositional approaches to embrace interconnectivity as a framework for identity formation, theorizing, social change, and the possibility of planetary citizenship. Speaking to many dimensions of contemporary scholarship, activism, and social justice work, Transformation Now! calls for and enacts innovative, radically inclusionary ways of reading, teaching, and communicating.