Patients and Healers in the High Roman Empire

Author: Ido Israelowich

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 142141628X

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 3016

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Patients and Healers in the High Roman Empire offers a fascinating holistic look at the practice of ancient Roman medicine. Ido Irsaelowich presents three richly detailed case studies—one focusing on the home and reproduction; another on the army; the last on medical tourism—from the point of view of those on both sides of the patient-healer divide. He explains in depth how people in the classical world became aware of their ailments, what they believed caused particular illnesses, and why they turned to certain healers—root cutters, gymnastic trainers, dream interpreters, pharmacologists, and priests—or sought medical care in specific places such as temples, bath houses, and city centers. The book brings to life the complex behavior and social status of all the actors involved in the medical marketplace. It also sheds new light on classical theories about sickness, the measures Romans undertook to tackle disease and improve public health, and personal expectations for and evaluations of various treatments. Ultimately, Israelowich concludes that this clamoring multitude of coexisting forms of health care actually shared a common language. Drawing on a diverse range of sources—including patient testimonies; the writings of physicians, historians, and poets; and official publications of the Roman state— Patients and Healers in the High Roman Empire is a groundbreaking history of the culture of classical medicine.

Empire and Ideology in the Graeco-Roman World

Selected Papers

Author: Benjamin Isaac

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107135893

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 1240

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This book explores how the Graeco-Roman world suffered from major power conflicts, imperial ambition, and ethnic, religious and racist strife.

Oxford Handbook of Science and Medicine in the Classical World

Author: Paul Keyser,with John Scarborough

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190878835

Category: History

Page: 1200

View: 3234

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With a focus on science in the ancient societies of Greece and Rome, including glimpses into Egypt, Mesopotamia, India and China, The Oxford Handbook of Science and Medicine in the Classical World offers an in depth synthesis of science and medicine circa 650 BCE to 650 CE. The Handbook comprises five sections, each with a specific focus on ancient science and medicine. The second section covers the early Greek era, up through Plato and the mid-fourth century bce. The third section covers the long Hellenistic era, from Aristotle through the end of the Roman Republic, acknowledging that the political shift does not mark a sharp intellectual break. The fourth section covers the Roman era from the late Republic through the transition to Late Antiquity. The final section covers the era of Late Antiquity, including the early Byzantine centuries. The Handbook provides through each of its approximately four dozen essays, a synthesis and synopsis of the concepts and models of the various ancient natural sciences, covering the early Greek era through the fall of the Roman Republic, including essays that explore topics such as music theory, ancient philosophers, astrology, and alchemy. The Oxford Handbook of Science and Medicine in the Classical World guides the reader to further exploration of the concepts and models of the ancient sciences, how they evolved and changed over time, and how they relate to one another and to their antecedents. There are a total of four dozen or so topical essays in the five sections, each of which takes as its focus the primary texts, explaining what is now known as well as indicating what future generations of scholars may come to know. Contributors suggest the ranges of scholarly disagreements and have been free to advocate their own positions. Readers are led into further literature (both primary and secondary) through the comprehensive and extensive bibliographies provided with each chapter.

The Tools of Asclepius

Surgical Instruments in Greek and Roman Times

Author: Lawrence Bliquez

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004283595

Category: Medical

Page: 476

View: 8956

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In The Tools of Asclepius Lawrence Bliquez provides a comprehensive, up-to-date treatment of the surgical instruments and paraphernalia used by Greco-Roman pharmacists, physicians and surgeons.

Popular Medicine in Graeco-Roman Antiquity: Explorations

Author: William V. Harris

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004326049

Category: Medical

Page: 336

View: 5836

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In Popular Medicine in Graeco-Roman Antiquity: Explorations an international group of scholars aims to give a fresh start to the study of the wide range of practices that people in Antiquity actually engaged in when they were faced with ill health.

Galen and the Rhetoric of Healing

Author: Susan P. Mattern

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801896347

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 921

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Galen is the most important physician of the Roman imperial era. Many of his theories and practices were the basis for medical knowledge for centuries after his death and some practices—like checking a patient’s pulse—are still used today. He also left a vast corpus of writings which makes up a full one-eighth of all surviving ancient Greek literature. Through her readings of hundreds of Galen’s case histories, Susan P. Mattern presents the first systematic investigation of Galen’s clinical practice. Galen’s patient narratives illuminate fascinating interplay among the craft of healing, social class, professional competition, ethnicity, and gender. Mattern describes the public, competitive, and masculine nature of medicine among the urban elite and analyzes the relationship between clinical practice and power in the Roman household. She also finds that although Galen is usually perceived as self-absorbed and self-promoting, his writings reveal him as sensitive to the patient’s history, symptoms, perceptions, and even words. Examining his professional interactions in the context of the world in which he lived and practiced, Galen and the Rhetoric of Healing provides a fresh perspective on a foundational figure in medicine and valuable insight into how doctors thought about their patients and their practice in the ancient world. -- Tana Allen

Homo Patiens - Approaches to the Patient in the Ancient World

Author: Georgia Petridou,Chiara Thumiger

Publisher: Brill

ISBN: 9004305564

Category: Medical

Page: 491

View: 4135

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Homo Patiens - Approaches to the Patient in the Ancient World is a collection of studies about the patients of the Graeco-Roman world, their role in the ancient medical encounters and their relationship to the health providers and medical practitioners of their time.

Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Sophistry in the High Roman Empire

Maximus of Tyre and Twelve Other Intellectuals

Author: Jeroen Lauwers

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004301534

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 340

View: 6446

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This book offers a discussion of the representation of the fields of philosophy, sophistry, and rhetoric in the orations of the philosophical orator Maximus of Tyre (2nd century CE) and twelve other intellectuals from the Roman Empire.

Asklepios, Medicine, and the Politics of Healing in Fifth-Century Greece

Between Craft and Cult

Author: Bronwen L. Wickkiser

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801889782

Category: History

Page: 178

View: 6024

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Delving deeply into ancient medical history, Bronwen L. Wickkiser explores the early development and later spread of the cult of Asklepios, one of the most popular healing gods in the ancient Mediterranean. Though Asklepios had been known as a healer since the time of Homer, evidence suggests that large numbers of people began to flock to the cult during the fifth century BCE, just as practitioners of Hippocratic medicine were gaining dominance. Drawing on close readings of period medical texts, literary sources, archaeological evidence, and earlier studies, Wickkiser finds two primary causes for the cult’s ascendance: it filled a gap in the market created by the refusal of Hippocratic physicians to treat difficult chronic ailments and it abetted Athenian political needs. Wickkiser supports these challenging theories with side-by-side examinations of the medical practices at Asklepios' sanctuaries and those espoused in Hippocratic medical treatises. She also explores how Athens' aspirations to empire influenced its decision to open the city to the healer-god's cult. In focusing on the fifth century and by considering the medical, political, and religious dimensions of the cult of Asklepios, Wickkiser presents a complex, nuanced picture of Asklepios' rise in popularity, Athenian society, and ancient Mediterranean culture. The intriguing and sometimes surprising information she presents will be valued by historians of medicine and classicists alike.

Medieval and Early Renaissance Medicine

An Introduction to Knowledge and Practice

Author: Nancy G. Siraisi

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226761312

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 1852

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Western Europe supported a highly developed and diverse medical community in the late medieval and early Renaissance periods. In her absorbing history of this complex era in medicine, Siraisi explores the inner workings of the medical community and illustrates the connections of medicine to both natural philosophy and technical skills.

Uroscopy in Early Modern Europe

Author: Michael Stolberg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317003330

Category: History

Page: 238

View: 5233

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Uroscopy - the diagnosis of disease by visual examination of the urine - played a very prominent role in early modern medical practice and in the lives of ordinary people. Widely considered as the most reliable way to diagnose diseases and pregnancies it was taught at the best universities. Leading physicians prided themselves on their mastery in this field. Countless medical writings were dedicated to uroscopy and artists represented it in hundreds of illustrations and paintings. Based on a wide range of textual and visual sources, such as autobiographies, court records, medical treatises and genre painting, this book offers the first comprehensive study of the place of uroscopy in early modern medicine, culture and society and of the - gradually changing - ways in which medical practitioners, lay persons and, last but not least, artists perceived and used it.

Science Education in the Early Roman Empire

Author: Richard Carrier

Publisher: Pitchstone Publishing (US&CA)

ISBN: 1634310918

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 6029

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Throughout the Roman Empire Cities held public speeches and lectures, had libraries, and teachers and professors in the sciences and the humanities, some subsidized by the state. There even existed something equivalent to universities, and medical and engineering schools. What were they like? What did they teach? Who got to attend them? In the first treatment of this subject ever published, Dr. Richard Carrier answers all these questions and more, describing the entire education system of the early Roman Empire, with a unique emphasis on the quality and quantity of its science content. He also compares pagan attitudes toward the Roman system of education with the very different attitudes of ancient Jews and Christians, finding stark contrasts that would set the stage for the coming Dark Ages.

Lucian and His Roman Voices

Cultural Exchanges and Conflicts in the Late Roman Empire

Author: Eleni Bozia

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317633822

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 222

View: 3356

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Lucian and His Roman Voices examines cultural exchanges, political propaganda, and religious conflicts in the Early Roman Empire through the eyes of Lucian, his contemporary Roman authors, and Christian Apologists. Offering a multi-faceted analysis of the Lucianic corpus, this book explores how Lucian, a Syrian who wrote in Greek and who became a Roman citizen, was affected by the socio-political climate of his time, reacted to it, and how he ‘corresponded’ with the Roman intelligentsia. In the process, this unique volume raises questions such as: What did the title ‘Roman citizen’ mean to native Romans and to others? How were language and literature politicized, and how did they become a means of social propaganda? This study reveals Lucian’s recondite historical and authorial personas and the ways in which his literary activity portrayed second-century reality from the perspectives of the Romans, Greeks, pagans, Christians, and citizens of the Roman Empire

The History of Medicine

A Beginner's Guide

Author: Mark Jackson

Publisher: Oneworld Publications

ISBN: 1780745206

Category: Medical

Page: 256

View: 9515

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As scientists confidently look forward to average life expectancies hitting 100+ years in some Western societies, it’s easy to forget how precarious our grasp on good health has been. It is a struggle no better demonstrated than by the myriad and extraordinary measures that humans have gone to – as diverse as animal sacrifice to stem cell transplants – in their quest to stave off death and disease. Acclaimed historian Mark Jackson takes a fresh, global view of mankind’s great battle, exploring both Western and Eastern traditions. Examining ancient right through to modern approaches to health and illness, Jackson presents the orthodox and alternative practices and key turning points – sometimes for good and sometimes not – that determined how different cultures tackled disease. The result is a fascinating survey of the complex ways in which medicine and society have shaped one another throughout the ages.

Renaissance Medicine

Author: Nicola Barber

Publisher: Heinemann-Raintree Library

ISBN: 1410946444

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 48

View: 9821

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"How much did the Renaissance change medical history and public health? Did landmark developments benefit the everyday lives of ordinary people? This book looks at the new 'scientific' ways of learning and experimentation of the period, to show what health and disease were like in the Old and New Worlds."

Soul Flame

Author: Barbara Wood

Publisher: Turner

ISBN: 9781596528659

Category: Fiction

Page: 478

View: 3241

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Acclaimed novelist Barbara Wood combines her superb storytelling gifts with medical and historical fact to create the epic adventure of an unusual and gifted young woman seeking her destiny in the ancient healing arts. Born into the tumultuous world of ancient Antioch, Selene is orphaned at birth. But before her father dies, he leaves a puzzling clue to her heritage: she has come from the gods and has a special destiny to fulfill. In the coming years, Selene studies the primitive healing arts with Mera, the healer-woman who adopts her. She learns how to lower fevers by brewing Hecate's Cure from the willow tree, how to apply green mold to an open wound to prevent infection, and most important, how to calm a patient by summoning the inner power of the "soul flame." But on her sixteenth birthday, Selene falls in love with Andreas, a passionate and troubled surgeon. When fate cruelly separates them, Selene's search for Andreas takes her to the great centers of civilization in the ancient world--Egypt, Babylon, and Rome. Desperate to find Andreas, Selene is torn between love and her dreams of healing when a revolutionary vision brings her to the fulfillment of her destiny--and the dawn of modern medicine.