Patients and Healers in the Context of Culture

An Exploration of the Borderland Between Anthropology, Medicine, and Psychiatry

Author: Arthur Kleinman

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520045118

Category: Medical

Page: 427

View: 4359

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Kleinman, a psychiatrist, trained in anthropology, reports on his studies of health care in Taiwan. He describes his observations of clinical interviews between various medical practitioner, folk-healers, temple medicine men, and Chinese-style and Western-style physicians and their patients. He stress the importance of adopting the proper cultural perspective, making ones interpretations within that framework.

Writing at the Margin

Discourse Between Anthropology and Medicine

Author: Arthur Kleinman

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520919471

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 1514

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One of the most influential and creative scholars in medical anthropology takes stock of his recent intellectual odysseys in this collection of essays. Arthur Kleinman, an anthropologist and psychiatrist who has studied in Taiwan, China, and North America since 1968, draws upon his bicultural, multidisciplinary background to propose alternative strategies for thinking about how, in the postmodern world, the social and medical relate. Writing at the Margin explores the border between medical and social problems, the boundary between health and social change. Kleinman studies the body as the mediator between individual and collective experience, finding that many health problems—for example the trauma of violence or depression in the course of chronic pain—are less individual medical problems than interpersonal experiences of social suffering. He argues for an ethnographic approach to moral practice in medicine, one that embraces the infrapolitical context of illness, the responses to it, the social institutions relating to it, and the way it is configured in medical ethics. Previously published in various journals, these essays have been revised, updated, and brought together with an introduction, an essay on violence and the politics of post-traumatic stress disorder, and a new chapter that examines the contemporary ethnographic literature of medical anthropology.

Healing Insanity: a Study of Igbo Medicine in Contemporary Nigeria

Author: Patrick E. Iroegbu

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1450096298

Category: Medical

Page: 557

View: 8386

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Healing Insanity: A Study of Igbo Medicine in Contemporary Nigeria is an original and in-depth study on endogenous medical system in an African society. It is craftily written and provides solid insight, through case studies and theory, into how insanity affects patients and the society. Particularly, it explores various collective representations and strategies regarding insanity and healing as it examines the healing institutions, healers, and ritual cults. The central question is, given the patterns of healing, how do the Igbo shape the incidence and symptoms of insanity, define its aetiology, and provide healers with culture-specific resources and skills to address this illness? The focus became increasingly centred on bodily semantics and endogenous knowledge systems and practices. Dr. Patrick Iroegbus work is a very valuable and rare study and has appeared at a desirable time. It is, for an African society, a comprehensive study of the many ways Igbo people, in their practical, routinelike attitudes and body-centred experiences, as well as in their more reflective aetiologic knowledge and healing institutions, relate to the phenomenon of insanity, or ara, in the cultural parlance. As the first of its kind, reminiscent of, and assured by, the various remarks of Igbo scholars and leaders at various meetings and discourses, the task this work has set out to accomplish is a very brave one. The authors account of his fieldwork experiences and adopted techniques illustrates his initiation, revealing him as a genuine ethnographer who is a friend of people and at ease with his field. With both the far-seeing and inspiring analysis of Igbo medicine, life, and culture accounted for in the work, the book stands out for ethnographers, teachers, students, leaders, policymakers, and the general public. This is a book that deserves to be read as it shapes the critical path toward understanding ways of healing insanity in a culture-specific context, crosscutting perspectives for a relationship between indigenous healing and the biomedical sphere. Prof. Ren Devisch (Africa Research Centre, University of Leuven) This book is written with a clear purpose for everyone to readto understand and heal insanityand indeed provides a thick piece of cultural philosophy and vernacular of Igbo medicine in hopes of putting cultural wisdom in pursuit of integral health care development. Prof. Pantaleon Iroegbu (Professor of Philosophy, Major-Seminary, Ekpoma, January 2006) To read this book, as I did, is to get the benefit of Dr. Patrick Iroegbus ethnographic insight for an archetypical African healing system in Igboland. It offers a fascinating theory of symbolic release that speaks of African symbolic action and knowledge system. Dr. Paul Komba, Esq. (University of Cambridge)

Medicine and Society in Ptolemaic Egypt

Author: Philippa Lang

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004235515

Category: Medical

Page: 332

View: 847

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Examining all forms of healing within the specific socioeconomic and environmental constraints of the Ptolemies’ Egypt, this book explores how linguistic, cultural and ethnic affiliations and interactions were expressed in the medical domain.

The Hermeneutics of Medicine and the Phenomenology of Health

Steps Towards a Philosophy of Medical Practice

Author: F. Svenaeus

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401594589

Category: Medical

Page: 203

View: 9270

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Fredrik Svenaeus' book is a delight to read. Not only does he exhibit keen understanding of a wide range of topics and figures in both medicine and philosophy, but he manages to bring them together in an innovative manner that convincingly demonstrates how deeply these two significant fields can be and, in the end, must be mutually enlightening. Medicine, Svenaeus suggests, reveals deep but rarely explicit themes whose proper comprehension invites a careful phenomenological and hermeneutical explication. Certain philosophical approaches, on the other hand - specifically, Heidegger's phenomenology and Gadamer's hermeneutics - are shown to have a hitherto unrealized potential for making sense of those themes long buried within Western medicine. Richard M. Zaner, Ann Geddes Stahlman Professor of Medical Ethics, Vanderbilt University

Ethnicity and the Dementias

Author: Gwen Yeo,Dolores Gallagher-Thompson

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781560324379

Category: Medical

Page: 261

View: 8311

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First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Clinical Education in the Health Professions

An Educator's Guide

Author: Clare Delany,Elizabeth Molloy

Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences

ISBN: 072957900X

Category: Medical

Page: 304

View: 1387

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Clinical settings are dynamic educational spaces that present both opportunities and barriers to learning and teaching. Designed to inform, challenge and educate health professionals about the evidence underpinning clinical education practices and outcomes, this multi-disciplinary book brings together important concepts in healthcare education and addresses context and processes of learning, professional identity and socialisation, feedback and assessment, ethics, and inter-professional education. The authors encourage teaching and learning practices based on research findings, expertise and innovation, and the development of individual teaching methods and styles from a theoretical base that provides relevant principles, direction and support. With clear links between theory, research and practice, collaboration from a broad range of clinical disciplines, and models for learning and teaching grounded in empirical research, Clinical Education in the Health Professions will become a standard reference for all health professionals and educators. examines patterns of practice in clinical education in the health professions, using a qualitative research focus identifies the roles of university and clinical educators, students, peers and patients in clinical education highlights implicit tensions in clinical education practice and presents strategies to identify and address such tensions challenges the reader to consider new approaches to clinical education that may optimise students’ learning and enculturation into the health professions Despite claims that clinical education lies at the heart of health care education, little empirical research has explored what constitutes effectiveness in clinical teaching and learning. This book draws on the research, ideas and expertise of researchers who have observed and researched different aspects of clinical education. Their research has spanned clinical education topics including professional identity and socialisation, assessment and feedback, pedagogical methods, clinical reasoning, dealing with ambiguity, dealing with diversity and interprofessional education. This book has been designed to synthesise empirical clinical education research and ideas about the context, value, processes and outcomes of clinical education. Each chapter presents a research based facet of clinical education as a platform from which knowledge and future research in clinical education can occur. The authors entice the reader to reconceptualise facets of their own teaching and learning practices based on research findings, expertise and innovation.

Gender, Health And Illness

The Case Of Nerves

Author: Dona L. Davis,Setha M. Low

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1317770471

Category: Psychology

Page: 175

View: 4071

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First published in 1989. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Understanding and Using Health Experiences

Improving patient care

Author: Sue Ziebland,Angela Coulter,Joseph D. Calabrese,Louise Locock

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191643246

Category: Medical

Page: 184

View: 1598

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Improving patient experience is a global priority for health policy-makers and care providers. The need to look at healthcare delivery through the eyes of patients is widely accepted, but how should it be done? What use can be made of this information, and what evidence is there that such exercises lead to better care? Understanding and Using Health Experiences: Improving patient care examines a broad range of different sources and techniques for gathering and analyzing health experiences. Providing an accessible and pragmatic overview of the diversity and richness of research in the field this book explores the strengths and limitations of different approaches, and assesses what each method can contribute to improving people's experience of illness, and the way that health services are delivered. The book looks at topics such as using focus groups to understand experiences of health and illness, patient surveys, and the internet as a source of information on people's experience. Using clear and engaging examples throughout, the book is accessibly written by experts in social science, health services, and health policy, and will be valuable to postgraduate students, healthcare practitioners, and individuals working in health and social policy, public sector management, and research.

Cancer, Culture and Communication

Author: Rhonda J. Moore,David Spiegel

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0306480077

Category: Medical

Page: 317

View: 7045

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This volume creates a multi-disciplinary dialogue about clinician-patient communication. It offers a description of the relevance of culture as a contextual effect that impacts the clinician-patient relationship. Some topics addressed include: oncology care, quality of life issues, supportive survivorship, etc. It is for physicians, nurses, hospice and palliative care professionals and public health professionals.

Physicians of Western Medicine

Anthropological Approaches to Theory and Practice

Author: Robert A. Hahn,Atwood D. Gaines

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400964307

Category: Social Science

Page: 345

View: 8139

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After putting down this weighty (in all senses of the word) collection, the reader, be she or he physician or social scientist, will (or at least should) feel uncomfortable about her or his taken-for-granted commonsense (therefore cultural) understanding of medicine. The editors and their collaborators show the medical leviathan, warts and all, for what it is: changing, pluralistic, problematic, powerful, provocative. What medicine proclaims itself to be - unified, scientific, biological and not social, non-judgmental - it is shown not to resemble very much. Those matters about which medicine keeps fairly silent, it turns out, come closer to being central to its clinical practice - managing errors and learning to conduct a shared moral dis course about mistakes, handling issues of competence and competition among biomedical practitioners, practicing in value-laden contexts on problems for which social science is a more relevant knowledge base than biological science, integrating folk and scientific models of illness in clinical communication, among a large number of highly pertinent ethnographic insights that illuminate medicine in the chapters that follow.

Stigmatization, Discrimination and Illness

Experiences among HIV-Seropositive Women in Tanga, Tanzania

Author: Bohle, Leah Franziska

Publisher: Universitätsverlag Göttingen

ISBN: 3863951085

Category: Social Science

Page: 119

View: 4092

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“She was given her own plate, her own cup, everything of her own, even when she just touched a cloth then nobody wanted to touch it again.” (Halima, HIV-seropositive) The book sheds light on the profound influence of an HIV-seropositive diagnosis on the lives of women and their social environment in the United Republic of Tanzania. The author, a medical doctor and social anthropologist, tells the story of six Tanzanian HIV-seropositive women, focusing on their negotiation and perception of illness and disease. Furthermore, the high levels of discrimination and stigmatization in the context of HIV-seropositivity that they experience are presented in detail, weaving together the impacts of an HIV-seropositive diagnosis with results analyzed both from a Medical Anthropology and Public Health perspective. Despite a new era of antiretroviral treatment, available in Tanzania free of cost, that has given cause for hope in a change in how the disease is perceived, the book impressively underlines that being HIV-seropositive remains a great challenge and heavy burden for women in Tanzania.

The Culture-Bound Syndromes

Folk Illnesses of Psychiatric and Anthropological Interest

Author: Ronald C. Simons,C.C. Hughes

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400952511

Category: Social Science

Page: 518

View: 8529

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In the last few years there has been a great revival of interest in culture-bound psychiatric syndromes. A spate of new papers has been published on well known and less familiar syndromes, and there have been a number of attempts to put some order into the field of inquiry. In a review of the literature on culture-bound syndromes up to 1969 Yap made certain suggestions for organizing thinking about them which for the most part have not received general acceptance (see Carr, this volume, p. 199). Through the seventies new descriptive and conceptual work was scarce, but in the last few years books and papers discussing the field were authored or edited by Tseng and McDermott (1981), AI-Issa (1982), Friedman and Faguet (1982) and Murphy (1982). In 1983 Favazza summarized his understanding of the state of current thinking for the fourth edition of the Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry, and a symposium on culture-bound syndromes was organized by Kenny for the Eighth International Congress of Anthropology and Ethnology. The strong est impression to emerge from all this recent work is that there is no substantive consensus, and that the very concept, "culture-bound syndrome" could well use some serious reconsideration. As the role of culture-specific beliefs and prac tices in all affliction has come to be increasingly recognized it has become less and less clear what sets the culture-bound syndromes apart.

Potentiating Health and the Crisis of the Immune System

Integrative Approaches to the Prevention and Treatment of Modern Diseases

Author: S. Fulder,A. Mizrahi,N. Sheinman

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1489900594

Category: Medical

Page: 286

View: 6052

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With all the enormous resources that are invested in medicine, it is sometimes a mystery why there is so much sickness still in evidence. Our life span, though higher than at any time in history, has now leveled off and has not significantly increased in the last two generations. There is a one-third increase in long-term illness in the last 20 years and a 44% increase in cancer incidence, which are not related to demographic issues. In some modern countries, the level of morbidity (defined as days off work because of sickness) has increased by two thirds in this time. Despite $1 trillion spent on cancer research in 20 years, the "War On Cancer" has recently been pronounced a complete failure by the u. s. President's Cancer Panel. Evidently we still have a long way to go. The goal of "Health for All by the Year 2000" as the World Health Organization has put it, is another forgotten dream. As ever, the answer will be found in breaking out of the old philosophical patterns and discovering the new, as yet unacceptable concepts. The problems of medicine today require a Kuhnian breakthrough into new paradigms, and new ways of thinking. And these new ways will not be mere variations of the old, but radical departures. This book, and the conference upon which it was based, is part of a search for these new pathways.

The Culture of AIDS in Africa

Hope and Healing Through Music and the Arts

Author: Gregory Barz,Judah M. Cohen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019978003X

Category: Music

Page: 528

View: 6828

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The Culture of AIDS in Africa enters into the many worlds of expression brought forth across this vast continent by the ravaging presence of HIV/AIDS. Africans and non-Africans, physicians and social scientists, journalists and documentarians share here a common and essential interest in understanding creative expression in crushing and uncertain times. They investigate and engage the social networks, power relationships, and cultural structures that enable the arts to convey messages of hope and healing, and of knowledge and good counsel to the wider community. And from Africa to the wider world, they bring intimate, inspiring portraits of the performers, artists, communities, and organizations that have shared with them their insights and the sense they have made of their lives and actions from deep within this devastating epidemic. Covering the wide expanse of the African continent, the 30 chapters include explorations of, for example, the use of music to cope with AIDS; the relationship between music, HIV/AIDS, and social change; visual approaches to HIV literacy; radio and television as tools for "edutainment;" several individual artists' confrontations with HIV/AIDS; various performance groups' response to the epidemic; combating HIV/AIDS with local cultural performance; and more. Source material, such as song lyrics and interviews, weaves throughout the collection, and contributions by editors Gregory Barz and Judah M. Cohen bookend the whole, to bring together a vast array of perspectives and sources into a nuanced and profoundly affective portrayal of the intricate relationship between HIV/AIDS and the arts in Africa.

Chinese Culture and Mental Health

Author: Wen-Shing Tseng,David Y. H. Wu

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 1483276279

Category: Political Science

Page: 436

View: 3704

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Chinese Culture and Mental Health presents an in-depth study of the culture and mental health of the Chinese people in varying settings, geographic areas, and times. The book focuses on the study of the relationships between mental health and customs, beliefs, and philosophies in the Chinese cultural setting. The text reviews traditional and contemporary Chinese culture; characteristic relations and psychological problems common in the Chinese family; adjustment of the Chinese in different socio-geographical circumstances; and general review of mental health problems. Ethnologists, sinologists, psychologists, anthropologists, and sociologists will find the book interesting.

Illness Behavior

A Multidisciplinary Model

Author: Sean McHugh,T. Michael Vallis

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1468452576

Category: Psychology

Page: 442

View: 407

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In August, 1985, the 2nd International Conference on Illness Behaviour was held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The first International Conference took place one year previous in Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. This book is based on the proceedings of the second conference. The purpose behind this conference was to facilitate the development of a single integrated model to account for illness experience and presentation. A major focus of the conference was to outline methodological issues related to current behaviour research. A multidiscipl~nary approach was emphasized because of the bias that collaborative efforts are likely to be the most successful in achieving greater understanding of illness behaviour. Significant advances in our knowledge are occurring in all areas of the biological and social sciences, albeit more slowly in the latter areas. Marked specialization in each of these areas has lead to greater difficulty in integrating new knowledge with that of other areas and the development of a meaningful cohesive model to which all can relate. Thus there is a major need for forums such as that provided by this conference.

Palliative Care E-Book

Core Skills and Clinical Competencies

Author: Linda L. Emanuel,S. Lawrence Librach

Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences

ISBN: 1437735975

Category: Medical

Page: 640

View: 6052

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Find out all you need to know about providing high-quality care to patients with serious illnesses from the 2nd edition of Palliative Care: Core Skills and Clinical Competencies. Drs. Linda L. Emanuel and S. Lawrence Librach, leaders in the field, address the clinical, physical, psychological, cultural, and spiritual dimensions that are integral to the care of the whole patient. They give you a broad understanding of the core clinical skills and competencies needed to effectively approach patient assessment, care of special populations, symptom control, ethical issues, and more. Clearly written in a user-friendly, high-yield format, this resource is your ultimate guidebook to the burgeoning practice of palliative medicine. Improve your pain management and symptom management skills with a better understanding of best practices in palliative care. Quickly review specific treatment protocols for both malignant and non-malignant illnesses, including HIV/AIDS, heart failure, renal failure, pulmonary disease, and neurodegenerative disease. Better understand and manage the common and unique challenges associated with delivering palliative care in various social settings, such as the ICU, hospice, and the home; and to diverse populations, such as children, elders, and vulnerable members of society. Expand your knowledge of palliative care issues with new chapters on Veterans, Special Populations, Prognostication, Delirium, Working with Families, Wound Care, Home Care, and Dealing with Economic Hardship. Find the information you need quickly and easily with a templated, high-yield format.

Introduction to the US Food System

Public Health, Environment, and Equity

Author: Roni Neff

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118913051

Category: Medical

Page: 576

View: 7220

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A public health approach to the US food system Introduction to the US Food System: Public Health,Environment, and Equity is a comprehensive and engagingtextbook that offers students an overview of today's US foodsystem, with particular focus on the food system'sinterrelationships with public health, the environment, equity, andsociety. Using a classroom-friendly approach, the text covers thecore content of the food system and provides evidence-basedperspectives reflecting the tremendous breadth of issues and ideasimportant to understanding today's US food system. The book is richwith illustrative examples, case studies, activities, anddiscussion questions. The textbook is a project of the Johns Hopkins Center for aLivable Future (CLF), and builds upon the Center's educationalmission to examine the complex interrelationships between diet,food production, environment, and human health to advance anecological perspective in reducing threats to the health of thepublic, and to promote policies that protect health, the globalenvironment, and the ability to sustain life for futuregenerations. Issues covered in Introduction to the US Food Systeminclude food insecurity, social justice, community and workerhealth concerns, food marketing, nutrition, resource depletion, andecological degradation. Presents concepts on the foundations of the US food system,crop production, food system economics, processing and packaging,consumption and overconsumption, and the environmental impacts offood Examines the political factors that influence food and how itis produced Ideal for students and professionals in many fields, includingpublic health, nutritional science, nursing, medicine, environment,policy, business, and social science, among others Introduction to the US Food System presents a broad viewof today's US food system in all its complexity and providesopportunities for students to examine the food system's stickiestproblems and think critically about solutions.