Liberty and Union

A Constitutional History of the United States, concise edition

Author: Edgar J. McManus,Tara Helfman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136757163

Category: Political Science

Page: 728

View: 3357

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This, the concise edition of Liberty and Union, is an abridged constitutional history of the United States, designed for short single-semester courses, comprising the key topics from Volumes 1 and 2. Written in a clear and engaging narrative style, it successfully unites thorough chronological coverage with a thematic approach, offering critical analysis of core constitutional history topics, set in the political, social, and economic context that made them constitutional issues in the first place. Combining a thoughtful and balanced narrative with an authoritative stance on key issues, the authors deliberately explain the past in the light of the past, without imposing upon it the standards of later generations. Authored by two experienced professors in the field, this concise edition presents seminal topics while retaining the narrative flow of the two full original volumes. An accessible alternative to dense scholarly works, this textbook avoids unnecessary technical jargon, defines legal terms and historical personalities where appropriate, and makes explicit connections between constitutional themes and historical events. For students in a short undergraduate or postgraduate constitutional history course, or anyone with a general interest in constitutional developments, this book will be essential reading. Useful features include: Full glossary of legal terminology Recommended reading A table of cases Extracts from primary documents Companion website Useful documents provided: Declaration of Independence Articles of Confederation Constitution of the United States of America Chronological list of Supreme Court justices

America, Empire of Liberty

A New History of the United States

Author: David Reynolds

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465020054

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 8158

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It was Thomas Jefferson who envisioned the United States as a great “empire of liberty.” This paradoxical phrase may be the key to the American saga: How could the anti-empire of 1776 became the world's greatest superpower? And how did the country that offered unmatched liberty nevertheless found its prosperity on slavery and the dispossession of Native Americans? In this new single-volume history spanning the entire course of US history—from 1776 through the election of Barack Obama—prize-winning historian David Reynolds explains how tensions between empire and liberty have often been resolved by faith—both the evangelical Protestantism that has energized American politics for centuries and the larger faith in American righteousness that has driven the country's expansion. Written with verve and insight, Empire of Liberty brilliantly depicts America in all of its many contradictions.

Secession, State, and Liberty

Author: David Gordon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351491709

Category: Political Science

Page: 344

View: 4732

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The political impulse to secede - to attempt to separate from central government control - is a conspicuous feature of the post-cold war world. It is alive and growing in Canada, Russia, China, Italy, Belgium, Britain, and even the United States Yet secession remains one of the least studied and least understood of all historical and political phenomena. The contributors to this volume have filled this gap with wide-ranging investigations - rooted in history, political philosophy, ethics, and economic theory - of secessionist movements in the United States, Canada, and Europe.

A History of the Supreme Court

Author: Bernard Schwartz

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195093872

Category: History

Page: 465

View: 4379

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A comprehensive history of the United States Supreme Court from its ill-esteemed beginning in 1790 to one of the most important and controversial branches of the Federal government.

The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States

Author: Kermit L. Hall,James W. Ely,Joel B. Grossman

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195176618

Category: Law

Page: 1239

View: 9896

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The second edition of this authoritative guide on the impact of the Supreme Court's decisions on American society includes updated entries on key cases over the past thirteen years, as well as a fully revised treatment of areas of constitutional law.

A People's History of the United States

1492-Present

Author: Howard Zinn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317325303

Category: History

Page: 744

View: 7781

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This is a new edition of the radical social history of America from Columbus to the present. This powerful and controversial study turns orthodox American history upside down to portray the social turmoil behind the "march of progress". Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, A People's History is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of - and in the words of - America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of America's greatest battles - the fights for fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality - were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance. Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through the Clinton years A People's History of the United States, which was nominated for the American Book Award in 1981, is an insightful analysis of the most important events in US history.

America's Constitution

A Biography

Author: Akhil Reed Amar

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1588364879

Category: History

Page: 672

View: 7326

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In America’s Constitution, one of this era’s most accomplished constitutional law scholars, Akhil Reed Amar, gives the first comprehensive account of one of the world’s great political texts. Incisive, entertaining, and occasionally controversial, this “biography” of America’s framing document explains not only what the Constitution says but also why the Constitution says it. We all know this much: the Constitution is neither immutable nor perfect. Amar shows us how the story of this one relatively compact document reflects the story of America more generally. (For example, much of the Constitution, including the glorious-sounding “We the People,” was lifted from existing American legal texts, including early state constitutions.) In short, the Constitution was as much a product of its environment as it was a product of its individual creators’ inspired genius. Despite the Constitution’s flaws, its role in guiding our republic has been nothing short of amazing. Skillfully placing the document in the context of late-eighteenth-century American politics, America’s Constitution explains, for instance, whether there is anything in the Constitution that is unamendable; the reason America adopted an electoral college; why a president must be at least thirty-five years old; and why–for now, at least–only those citizens who were born under the American flag can become president. From his unique perspective, Amar also gives us unconventional wisdom about the Constitution and its significance throughout the nation’s history. For one thing, we see that the Constitution has been far more democratic than is conventionally understood. Even though the document was drafted by white landholders, a remarkably large number of citizens (by the standards of 1787) were allowed to vote up or down on it, and the document’s later amendments eventually extended the vote to virtually all Americans. We also learn that the Founders’ Constitution was far more slavocratic than many would acknowledge: the “three fifths” clause gave the South extra political clout for every slave it owned or acquired. As a result, slaveholding Virginians held the presidency all but four of the Republic’s first thirty-six years, and proslavery forces eventually came to dominate much of the federal government prior to Lincoln’s election. Ambitious, even-handed, eminently accessible, and often surprising, America’s Constitution is an indispensable work, bound to become a standard reference for any student of history and all citizens of the United States.

Colonial origins of the American Constitution

a documentary history

Author: Donald S. Lutz

Publisher: Liberty Fund Inc.

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 8966

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This landmark collection of eighty documents created by the American colonists--and not English officials--is the genesis of American fundamental law and constitutionalism. Included are all documents attempting to unite the colonies, beginning with the New England Confederation of 1643.

A March of Liberty: From the founding to 1890

Author: Melvin I. Urofsky,Paul Finkelman

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195126341

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 5036

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This work is an overview of American constitutional development, from the founding of the English colonies down through the decisions of the latest term of the Supreme Court. It offers a complete reference work that should be intelligible to the layperson as well as to the specialist.

The Constitutional Convention

A Narrative History from the Notes of James Madison

Author: James Madison,Edward J. Larson,Michael P. Winship

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN: 0307789209

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 9202

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In 1787, the American union was in disarray. The incompatible demands of the separate states threatened its existence; some states were even in danger of turning into the kind of tyranny they had so recently deposed. A truly national government was needed, one that could raise money, regulate commerce, and defend the states against foreign threats–without becoming as overbearing as England. So thirty-six-year-old James Madison believed. That summer, the Virginian was instrumental in organizing the Constitutional Convention, in which one of the world’s greatest documents would be debated, created, and signed. Inspired by a sense of history in the making, he kept the most extensive notes of any attendee.Now two esteemed scholars have made these minutes accessible to everyone. Presented with modern punctuation and spelling, judicious cuts, and helpful notes–plus fascinating background information on every delegate and an overview of the tumultuous times–here is the great drama of how the Constitution came to be, from the opening statements to the final votes. This Modern Library Paperback Classic also includes an Introduction and appendices from the authors. From the Trade Paperback edition.

We the People, Volume 2

Transformations

Author: Bruce Ackerman

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674736621

Category: History

Page: 538

View: 656

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Constitutional change, seemingly so orderly, formal, and refined, has in fact been a revolutionary process from the first, as Bruce Ackerman makes clear in We the People, Volume 2: Transformations. The Founding Fathers, hardly the genteel conservatives of myth, set America on a remarkable course of revolutionary disruption and constitutional creativity that endures to this day. After the bloody sacrifices of the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln and the Republican Party revolutionized the traditional system of constitutional amendment as they put principles of liberty and equality into higher law. Another wrenching transformation occurred during the Great Depression, when Franklin Roosevelt and his New Dealers vindicated a new vision of activist government against an assault by the Supreme Court. These are the crucial episodes in American constitutional history that Ackerman takes up in this second volume of a trilogy hailed as “one of the most important contributions to American constitutional thought in the last half-century” (Cass Sunstein, The New Republic). In each case he shows how the American people—whether led by the Founding Federalists or the Lincoln Republicans or the Roosevelt Democrats—have confronted the Constitution in its moments of great crisis with dramatic acts of upheaval, always in the name of popular sovereignty. A thoroughly new way of understanding constitutional development, We the People, Volume 2: Transformations reveals how America’s “dualist democracy” provides for these populist upheavals that amend the Constitution, often without formalities. The book also sets contemporary events, such as the Reagan Revolution and Roe v. Wade, in deeper constitutional perspective. In this context Ackerman exposes basic constitutional problems inherited from the New Deal Revolution and exacerbated by the Reagan Revolution, then considers the fundamental reforms that might resolve them. A bold challenge to formalist and fundamentalist views, this volume demonstrates that ongoing struggle over America’s national identity, rather than consensus, marks its constitutional history.

The Correspondence of Lord Acton and Richard Simpson:

Author: John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton Baron Acton,Richard Simpson

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 9780521086882

Category: History

Page: 342

View: 7001

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Lord Acton (1834-1902) and Richard Simpson (1820-76) were the principal figures in the Liberal Catholic movement of nineteenth-century England, an ultimately unsuccessful effort to reconcile the Roman Catholic Church with the leading secular thought of the day. They collaborated in editing the Rambler (1858-62) and the Home and Foreign Review (1862-4), two of the most distinguished Catholic periodicals of the period. The correspondence is the record of this collaboration and sheds light on the religious, political and intellectual history of mid-nineteenth-century England. Though heaviest for the years of their joint work on the Rambler and the Home and Foreign Review, the correspondence continued up to 1875, a year before Simpson's death.

The American Revolution, State Sovereignty, and the American Constitutional Settlement, 1765–1800

Author: Aaron N. Coleman

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 1498500633

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 4147

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This book examines the ideological, political, and constitutional contexts of the Founding era from the drafting of the Articles of Confederation to the ratification of the Constitution and the Federalist–Jeffersonian political conflict. The author highlights the constitutional and theoretical importance of state sovereignty during the Revolutionary period.

Compact of the Republic

The League of States and the Constitution

Author: David Benner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780692484265

Category:

Page: 364

View: 1603

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The genesis of the United States Constitution was built upon centuries of tyranny inflicted by treacherous kings and highly centralized government. In many cases, this authority had to be challenged directly in order for liberty to thrive. As a result, the Constitution was born from a laborious and exhaustive understanding of the British experience that the founders lived under and observed. In Compact of the Republic, David Benner aims to prove that the Constitution did not impose a nationalist, powerful central government, and was not ratified by "one people." Instead, the Constitution was a multi-party compact set up by the states, where the states were the masters of their own creation. The states built the federal government, and did not intend for their creation to rule over them. Compact of the Republic promises to become the standard argument for the compact view of the union, and throws a wrench into the wheel of contemporary legal thought. In Compact of the Republic, historian David Benner: *Contends that representatives were made aware that power could be resumed by the states after acts of federal overreach and usurpation *Explores the historical foundation behind the Bill of Rights, and traces the limitations on government to malevolent actions of kings *Proves the Constitution acknowledges the states in the plural, as a collection of societies with varied interests *Reveals that the "elastic clauses" were clearly explained and leave no room for modern reinterpretation *Explains how the federal judiciary now overturns state laws that they have no discretion over, to the contrary of its original scope of power *Describes how Thomas Jefferson and James Madison believed that unconstitutional federal laws had to be opposed, nullified, and obstructed by the states *Illustrates that ratification was only secured by convincing opponents of the Constitution that the document would produce a weak general government with limited, enumerated powers