Later Medieval Europe

From Saint Louis to Luther

Author: Daniel Philip Waley

Publisher: Longman Publishing Group

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 9857

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In this well-known intrduction Dr Waley explores the key aspects of the history of later medieval Europe (c1250-1520) and outlines the leading influences of the time. He discusses cultural developments and the history of ideas, as well as political and economic topics. The central theme is the growing power of the state and the effect of this on political ideas

A History of Medieval Europe

From Constantine to Saint Louis

Author: R.H.C. Davis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317867882

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 2925

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R.C. Davis provided the classic account of the European medieval world; equipping generations of undergraduate and ‘A’ level students with sufficient grasp of the period to debate diverse historical perspectives and reputations. His book has been important grounding for both modernists required to take a course in medieval history, and those who seek to specialise in the medieval period. In updating this classic work to a third edition, the additional author now enables students to see history in action; the diverse viewpoints and important research that has been undertaken since Davis’ second edition, and progressed historical understanding. Each of Davis original chapters now concludes with a ‘new directions and developments’ section by Professor RI Moore, Emeritus of Newcastle University. A key work updated in a method that both enhances subject understanding and sets important research in its wider context. A vital resource, now up-to-date for generations of historians to come.

Later Medieval Europe

1250-1520

Author: N.A

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317890175

Category: History

Page: 372

View: 6263

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From the divine right of kings to the political philosophies of writers such as Machiavelli, the medieval city-states to the unification of Spain, Daniel Waley and Peter Denley focus on the growing power of the state to illuminate changing political ideas in Europe between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries. Spanning the entire continent and beyond, and using contemporary voices wherever possible, the authors include substantial sections on economics, religion, and art, and how developments in these areas fed into and were influenced by the transformation of political thinking. The new edition takes the narrative beyond the confines of western Europe with chapters on East Central Europe and the teutonic knights, and the Portuguese expansion across the Atlantic. The third edition of this classic introduction to the period includes even greater use of contemporary voices, full reading lists, and new chapters on East Central Europe and Portuguese exploration. Suitable as an introductory text for undergraduate courses in Medieval Studies and Medieval European History.

Europe in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries

Author: Denys Hay

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131787191X

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 3403

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The second edition of this highly successful textbook analyses the structure of later medieval society in Europe, identifies its main groups and their political programmes, and examines their impact on the political, economic and social history of the major European states. There are many additions and expansions in this new edition, and the important chapter on the Central Monarchies (of Poland, Hungary, Bohemia, Rumania and Lithuania) has been newly contributed by Professor J M Bak of the University of British Columbia.

Printing, Propaganda, and Martin Luther

Author: Mark U. Edwards, Jr.

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN: 9781451413991

Category: Religion

Page: 225

View: 8404

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A study of Protestant and Catholic pamphlets published in Strasbourg during the early years of the Reformation looks at Martin Luther's use of the recently invented printing press and his dominance of the new medium.

Encyclopedia of Martin Luther and the Reformation

Author: Mark A. Lamport

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442271590

Category: Religion

Page: 978

View: 7970

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The Encyclopedia of Martin Luther and the Reformation is a comprehensive study of the life and work of Martin Luther and the movements that followed him—in history and through today. Entries explore Luther’s contributions to theology, sacraments, his influence on the church and contemporaries, his character, and more.

Women In Late Medieval and Reformation Europe 1200-1550

Author: Helen M. Jewell

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 113723248X

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 3840

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The period from c. 500 to 1200 comprises the formative centuries in European history after the fall of the Roman Empire in the west. Societies had to live through political, social, economic and religious challenges. Half the population, though, also had to labour under additional constraints imposed by the prevalent gender theories, which carried a mixture of inherited Judeo-Christian tradition and classical medical and legal custom through the period. Helen M. Jewell provides a lively survey of western European women's activities and experiences during this timespan. The core chapters investigate: - the function of women in the countryside and towns - the role of women in the ruling and landholding classes - women within the context of religion. This practical centre of the book is embedded in an analysis of contemporary, usually male-voiced, gender theories and society's expectations of women. Several individuals who vastly exceeded these expectations, crashing through the 'glass ceilings' of their day, are brought together in a fascinating final chapter. Combining a historiographical survey of trends over the last thirty years with more recent scholarship, this is the ideal introductory guide for anyone with an interest in women's history from the Dark Age through to the early Medieval period.

Local Religion in Colonial Mexico

Author: Martin Austin Nesvig

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826334022

Category: History

Page: 289

View: 4107

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The ten essays inLocal Religion in Colonial Mexicoprovide information about the religious culture in colonial Mexico. Carlos Eire's essay begins the study with the meaning of "popular religion" in colonial Mexico. Antonio Rubial García looks at the use of icons. Martin Austin Nesvig's essay discusses Tlatelolco, a city near Tenochtitlan and the site of Mexico's college for Indian education where the Indians studied classical Latin, Spanish grammar, and Catholic theology in preparation for the priesthood. William Taylor's writing uses an eighteenth-century Franciscan friar to demonstrate that priests transferred their own religion and networks of authority, power, and knowledge into their pastoral service. David Tavárez uses examples from Oaxaca to show seventeenth-century Zapotecs were not willing converts to Catholicism, preferring to retain the "idolatrous" beliefs of their ancestors. Edward Osowski presents the stories of two Nahua alms collectors who also served as spiritual leaders in their respective villages of colonial Mexico. Brian Larkin's essay discusses how eighteenth-century Mexico City Catholics gradually lost their belief that earthly prayers could help an individual's soul enter heaven. Nicole von Germeten tells how men of African heritage accepted the country's religious beliefs. Javier Villa-Flores analyzes the ways masters and slaves made use of Christian dogma to live with the harsh institution of slavery. The final essay, by William Christian, Jr., examines the different "Catholicisms" that exist in the world. "As the first collection of essays on local religion in Colonial Mexico, this volume sets a high standard for the quality of its contributions and the variety of its contents. A discussion of the concept of local religion is followed by eight fascinating case studies from various regions of colonial Mexico, spanning from the mid-sixteenth to the late eighteenth centuries. The essays refer to numerous ethnic groups and cultures. Each essay represents the richness and complexity of Mexican history. William Christian, known for his work on the local religion of Spain, provides a final reflection on the topic for New Spain. This book is bound to benefit students and scholars of history and religion, and to make us think more about local religion in Mexico today."--Kevin Terraciano, Associate Professor of History, UCLA

The Italian City Republics

Author: Daniel Philip Waley,Trevor Dean

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317864468

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 8843

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Daniel Waley and Trevor Dean illustrate how, from the eleventh century onwards, many dozens of Italian towns achieved independence as political entities, unhindered by any centralising power. Until the fourteenth century, when the regimes of individual ‘tyrants’ took over in most towns, these communes were the scene of a precocious, and very well-documented, experiment in republican self-government. Focusing on the typical medium-sized towns rather than the better-known cities, the authors draw on a rich variety of contemporary material (both documentary and literary) to portray the world of the communes, illustrating the patriotism and public spirit as well as the equally characteristic factional strife which was to tear them apart. Discussion of the artistic and social lives of the inhabitants shows how these towns were the seed-bed of the cultural achievements of the early Renaissance. In this fourth edition, Trevor Dean has expanded the book’s treatment of religion, women, housing, architecture and art, to take account of recent trends in the abundant historiography of these topics. A new selection of illuminating images has been included, and the bibliography brought up to date. Both students and the general reader interested in Italian history, literature and art will find this accessible book a rewarding and fascinating read.

Women and Poor Relief in Seventeenth-Century France

The Early History of the Daughters of Charity

Author: Susan E. Dinan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351872303

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 4856

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Chronicling the history of the Daughters of Charity through the seventeenth century, this study examines how the community's existence outside of convents helped to change the nature of women's religious communities and the early modern Catholic church. Unusually for the time, this group of Catholic religious women remained uncloistered. They lived in private houses in the cities and towns of France, offering medical care, religious instruction and alms to the sick and the poor; by the end of the century, they were France's premier organization of nurses. This book places the Daughters of Charity within the context of early modern poor relief in France - the author shows how they played a critical role in shaping the system, and also how they were shaped by it. The study also examines the complicated relationship of the Daughters of Charity to the Catholic church of the time, analyzing it not only for what light it can shed on the history of the community, but also for what it can tell us about the Catholic Reformation more generally.

Studies in Reformed Theology and History

Author: A. N. S. Lane,Alan D. Savage,Barry Collett,Hans Boersma,Louis Joseph Mitchell,W. J. Torrance Kirby,Wolf Krötke,Philip G. Ziegler,Christina-Maria Bammel

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781889980096

Category: Reformed Church

Page: 155

View: 3651

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Pope Joan

A Novel

Author: Donna Woolfolk Cross

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 9780307453198

Category: Fiction

Page: 432

View: 6973

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"Pope Joan has all the elements one wants in a historical drama – love, sex, violence, duplicity, and long-buried secrets. Cross has written an engaging book."–Los Angeles Times Book Review In this international bestseller and basis for the 2009 movie of the same name, Donna Woolfolk Cross brings the Dark Ages to life in all their brutal splendor and shares the dramatic story of a woman whose strength of vision led her to defy the social restrictions of her day. For a thousand years her existence has been denied. She is the legend that will not die–-Pope Joan, the ninth-century woman who disguised herself as a man and rose to become the only female ever to sit on the throne of St. Peter. Now in this riveting novel, Cross paints a sweeping portrait of an unforgettable heroine who struggles against restrictions her soul cannot accept. Brilliant and talented, young Joan rebels against medieval social strictures forbidding women to learn. When her brother is brutally killed during a Viking attack, Joan takes up his cloak--and his identity--and enters the monastery of Fulda. As Brother John Anglicus, Joan distinguishes herself as a great scholar and healer. Eventually, she is drawn to Rome, where she becomes enmeshed in a dangerous web of love, passion, and politics. Triumphing over appalling odds, she finally attains the highest office in Christendom--wielding a power greater than any woman before or since. But such power always comes at a price . . . "Brings the savage ninth century vividly to life in all its alien richness. An enthralling, scholarly historical novel." --Rebecca Fraser, Author of The Brontës

The Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy

From the Rediscovery of Aristotle to the Disintegration of Scholasticism, 1100-1600

Author: Norman Kretzmann,Anthony Kenny,Jan Pinborg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521369336

Category: Philosophy

Page: 1035

View: 1500

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This 1982 book is a history of the great age of scholastism from Abelard to the rejection of Aristotelianism in the Renaissance, combining the highest standards of medieval scholarship with a respect for the interests and insights of contemporary philosophers, particularly those working in the analytic tradition. The volume follows on chronologically from The Cambridge History of Later Greek and Early Medieval Philosophy, though it does not continue the histories of Greek and Islamic philosophy but concentrates on the Latin Christian West. Unlike other histories of medieval philosophy that divide the subject matter by individual thinkers, it emphasises the parts of more historical and theological interest. This volume is organised by those topics in which recent philosophy has made the greatest progress.

The Central Middle Ages

Europe 950-1320

Author: Daniel Power

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199253110

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 9261

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This new volume in the Short Oxford History of Europe series traces the history of Europe in the central middle ages (c.950-1320), an age of far-reaching change for the continent. Seven expert contributors consider the history of this period from a variety of perspectives, including political, social, economic, religious and intellectual history. - ;The period from the late tenth to the early fourteenth centuries was one of the most dynamic in European history. Latin Christendom found a new confidence which has left its mark upon the landscape in the form of the great cathedrals and castles, w.