I Fight for a Living

Boxing and the Battle for Black Manhood, 1880-1915

Author: Louis Moore

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 025209994X

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 240

View: 1397

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The black prizefighter labored in one of the few trades where an African American man could win renown: boxing. His prowess in the ring asserted an independence and powerful masculinity rare for black men in a white-dominated society, allowing him to be a man--and thus truly free. Louis Moore draws on the life stories of African American fighters active from 1880 to 1915 to explore working-class black manhood. As he details, boxers bought into American ideas about masculinity and free enterprise to prove their equality while using their bodies to become self-made men. The African American middle class, meanwhile, grappled with an expression of public black maleness they saw related to disreputable leisure rather than respectable labor. Moore shows how each fighter conformed to middle class ideas of masculinity based on his own judgment of what culture would accept. Finally, he argues that African American success in the ring shattered the myth of black inferiority despite media and government efforts to defend white privilege.

I Fight for a Living

Boxing and the Battle for Black Manhood, 1880-1915

Author: Louis Moore

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252041341

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 240

View: 7435

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The black prizefighter labored in one of the few trades where an African American man could win renown: boxing. His prowess in the ring asserted an independence and powerful masculinity rare for black men in a white-dominated society, allowing him to be a man--and thus truly free. Louis Moore draws on the life stories of African American fighters active from 1880 to 1915 to explore working-class black manhood. As he details, boxers bought into American ideas about masculinity and free enterprise to prove their equality while using their bodies to become self-made men. The African American middle class, meanwhile, grappled with an expression of public black maleness they saw related to disreputable leisure rather than respectable labor. Moore shows how each fighter conformed to middle class ideas of masculinity based on his own judgment of what culture would accept. Finally, he argues that African American success in the ring shattered the myth of black inferiority despite media and government efforts to defend white privilege.

We Will Win the Day: The Civil Rights Movement, the Black Athlete, and the Quest for Equality

Author: Louis Moore

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440839530

Category: Social Science

Page: 233

View: 400

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This exceedingly timely book looks at the history of black activist athletes and the important role of the black community in making sure fair play existed, not only in sports, but across U.S. society. • Offers the first significant synthesis covering the black athlete and the Civil Rights Movement • Provides a history of activist African American athletes, examining the central role the black athlete and sports played in shaping America's democracy from 1945 through the late 1960s • Discusses the role the black press and the black community played in integrating sports • Links stars like Jackie Robinson and Althea Gibson to athletes who are largely forgotten, like boxer Joe Dorsey who fought Louisiana's ban on integrated sports, and Maggie Hathaway who paved the way for integrated golf in Los Angeles

Redemption Song

Muhammad Ali and the Spirit of the Sixties

Author: Mike Marqusee

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 1786632063

Category: History

Page: 326

View: 5119

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A classic book that traces Muhammad Ali’s political development in the sixties When Muhammad Ali died, many mourned the life of the greatest sportsman the world had ever seen. In Redemption Song, Mike Marqusee argues that Ali was not only a boxer but a remarkable political figure in a decade of tumultuous change. Playful, popular, always confrontational, Ali refashioned the role of a political activist and was central, alongside figures such as Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, to the black liberation and the anti-war movements. Marqusee shows that sport and politics were always intertwined, and this is the reason why Ali remained an international beacon of hope, long after he had left the ring.

Game, Set, Match

Billie Jean King and the Revolution in Women's Sports

Author: Susan Ware

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807834541

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 282

View: 3005

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Argues that Billie Jean King's 1973 defeat of male player Bobby Riggs in tennis' Battle of the Sexes match helped, along with the passage of the Title IX anti-sex discrimination act, cause a revolution in women's sports.

A Well-Paid Slave

Curt Flood's Fight for Free Agency in Professional Sports

Author: Brad Snyder

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1440619018

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 480

View: 8130

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After the 1969 season, the St. Louis Cardinals traded their star center fielder, Curt Flood, to the Philadelphia Phillies, setting off a chain of events that would change professional sports forever. At the time there were no free agents, no no-trade clauses. When a player was traded, he had to report to his new team or retire. Unwilling to leave St. Louis and influenced by the civil rights movement, Flood chose to sue Major League Baseball for his freedom. His case reached the Supreme Court, where Flood ultimately lost. But by challenging the system, he created an atmosphere in which, just three years later, free agency became a reality. Flood’s decision cost him his career, but as this dramatic chronicle makes clear, his influence on sports history puts him in a league with Jackie Robinson and Muhammad Ali.

Sports Matters

Race, Recreation, and Culture

Author: John Bloom,Michael Willard

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814798810

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 1635

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Sports Matters brings critical attention to the centrality of race within the politics and pleasures of the massive sports culture that developed in the U.S. during the past century and a half.

San Francisco Bay Area Sports

Golden Gate Athletics, Recreation, and Community

Author: Rita Liberti,Maureen Smith

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 1682260208

Category: History

Page: 354

View: 5719

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San Francisco Bay Area Sports brings together fifteen essays covering the issues, controversies, and personalities that have emerged as northern Californians recreated and competed over the last 150 years. The area’s diversity, anti-establishment leanings, and unique and beautiful natural surroundings are explored in the context of a dynamic sporting past that includes events broadcast to millions or activities engaged in by just a few. Professional and college events are covered along with lesser-known entities such as Oakland’s public parks, tennis player and Bay Area native Rosie Casals, environmentalism and hiking in Marin County, and the origins of the Gay Games. Taken as a whole, this book clarifies how sport is connected to identities based on sexuality, gender, race, and ethnicity. Just as crucial, the stories here illuminate how sport and recreation can potentially create transgressive spaces, particularity in a place known for its nonconformity.

Cold War Games

Propaganda, the Olympics, and U.S. Foreign Policy

Author: Toby C Rider

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252098455

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 8073

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It is the early Cold War. The Soviet Union appears to be in irresistible ascendance, and moves to exploit the Olympic Games as a vehicle for promoting international communism. In response, the United States conceives a subtle, far-reaching psychological warfare campaign to blunt the Soviet advance. Drawing on newly declassified materials and archives, Toby C. Rider chronicles how the US government used the Olympics to promote democracy and its own policy aims during the tense early phase of the Cold War. Rider shows how the government, though constrained by traditions against interference in the Games, eluded detection by cooperating with private groups, including secretly funded émigré organizations bent on liberating their home countries from Soviet control. At the same time, the United States appropriated Olympic host cities to hype the American economic and political system while, behind the scenes, the government attempted clandestine manipulation of the International Olympic Committee. Rider also details the campaigns that sent propaganda materials around the globe as the United States mobilized culture in general, and sports in particular, to fight the communist threat.

The Unlevel Playing Field

A Documentary History of the African American Experience in Sport

Author: David Kenneth Wiggins,Patrick B. Miller

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252028205

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 493

View: 5734

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This extraordinarily rich compendium of primary sources charts the significant, intertwining history of African Americans and sport. The Unlevel Playing Field contains more than one hundred documents -- ranging chronologically from a challenge issued by prize fighter Tom Molineaux in the London Times in 1810 to a forward-looking interview with Harry Edwards in 2000. Introductions and head-notes provided by David K. Wiggins and Patrick B. Miller place each document in context, shaping an unrivaled narrative.Readers will find dozens of accounts taken from newspapers (both black and white), periodicals, and autobiographies, by literary and sports figures, activists, historians, and others. Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey, James Weldon Johnson, Richard Wright, A. S. "Doc" Young, Eldredge Cleaver, Nikki Giovanni, John Edgar Wideman, bell hooks, James Baldwin, Roy Wilkins, Henry Louis Gates, and Gerald Early are included here.Tracing the participation of blacks in American sport from the days of slavery, The Unlevel Playing Field touches on nearly every major sport and covers the full sweep of America's past. Documents include discussions of the color line in organized baseball during the Jim Crow era and athletics in the American army, as well as portraits of turn-of-the-century figures like the champion sprint cyclist Marshall "Major" Taylor and boxers George Dixon and Jack Johnson.Other selections tackle the National Tennis Association championship, high school basketball, debates over participation of black athletes in the 1968 Olympics, and the place of African American women in sport. Countless pioneering and modern-day African American athletes are spotlighted here, from Jackie Robinson, Jesse Owens, Joe Louis, Muhammad Ali, and Althea Gibson, to Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, and Venus and Serena Williams.A thorough and informative bibliographical essay by Wiggins and Miller concludes the volume.

Richmond Unchained

The Biography of the World's First Black Sporting Superstar

Author: Luke G. Williams

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445645092

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 264

View: 7355

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The first ever biography of slave turned bare-knuckle boxing legend Bill Richmond (1763-1829).

Modern Coliseum

Stadiums and American Culture

Author: Benjamin D. Lisle

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812294076

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 328

View: 6750

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From the legendary Ebbets Field in the heart of Brooklyn to the amenity-packed Houston Astrodome to the "retro" Oriole Park at Camden Yards, stadiums have taken many shapes and served different purposes throughout the history of American sports culture. In the early twentieth century, a new generation of stadiums arrived, located in the city center, easily accessible to the public, and offering affordable tickets that drew mixed crowds of men and women from different backgrounds. But in the successive decades, planners and architects turned sharply away from this approach. In Modern Coliseum, Benjamin D. Lisle tracks changes in stadium design and culture since World War II. These engineered marvels channeled postwar national ambitions while replacing aging ballparks typically embedded in dense urban settings. They were stadiums designed for the "affluent society"—brightly colored, technologically expressive, and geared to the car-driving, consumerist suburbanite. The modern stadium thus redefined one of the city's more rambunctious and diverse public spaces. Modern Coliseum offers a cultural history of this iconic but overlooked architectural form. Lisle grounds his analysis in extensive research among the archives of teams, owners, architects, and cities, examining how design, construction, and operational choices were made. Through this approach, we see modernism on the ground, as it was imagined, designed, built, and experienced as both an architectural and a social phenomenon. With Lisle's compelling analysis supplemented by over seventy-five images documenting the transformation of the American stadium over time, Modern Coliseum will be of interest to a variety of readers, from urban and architectural historians to sports fans.

Creating Masculinity in Los Angeles's Little Manila

Working-Class Filipinos and Popular Culture, 1920s-1950s

Author: Linda España-Maram

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231510806

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 4371

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In this new work, Linda España-Maram analyzes the politics of popular culture in the lives of Filipino laborers in Los Angeles's Little Manila, from the 1920s to the 1940s. The Filipinos' participation in leisure activities, including the thrills of Chinatown's gambling dens, boxing matches, and the sensual pleasures of dancing with white women in taxi dance halls sent legislators, reformers, and police forces scurrying to contain public displays of Filipino virility. But as España-Maram argues, Filipino workers, by flaunting "improper" behavior, established niches of autonomy where they could defy racist attitudes and shape an immigrant identity based on youth, ethnicity, and notions of heterosexual masculinity within the confines of a working class. España-Maram takes this history one step further by examining the relationships among Filipinos and other Angelenos of color, including the Chinese, Mexican Americans, and African Americans. Drawing on oral histories and previously untapped archival records, España-Maram provides an innovative and engaging perspective on Filipino immigrant experiences.

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1538114984

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 455

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Mad Men, Mad World

Sex, Politics, Style, and the 1960s

Author: Lauren M. E. Goodlad,Lilya Kaganovsky,Robert A. Rushing

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822354187

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 421

View: 1481

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In this comprehensive analysis of the TV series Mad Men, scholars explore the groundbreaking drama in relation to fashion, history, architecture, civil rights, feminism, consumerism, art, cinema, and the serial format.

The Nazi Olympics

Author: Richard D. Mandell

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252013256

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 2151

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This book is an expose of one of the most bizarre festivals in sport history. It provides portraits of key figures including Adolf Hitler, Jesse Owens, Leni Riefenstahl, Helen Stephens, Kee Chung Sohn, and Avery Brundage. It also conveys the charade that reinforced and mobilized the hysterical patriotism of the German masses.

Sport in Capitalist Society

A Short History

Author: Tony Collins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135081980

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 8478

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Why are the Olympic Games the driving force behind a clampdown on civil liberties? What makes sport an unwavering ally of nationalism and militarism? Is sport the new opiate of the masses? These and many other questions are answered in this new radical history of sport by leading historian of sport and society, Professor Tony Collins. Tracing the history of modern sport from its origins in the burgeoning capitalist economy of mid-eighteenth century England to the globalised corporate sport of today, the book argues that, far from the purity of sport being ‘corrupted’ by capitalism, modern sport is as much a product of capitalism as the factory, the stock exchange and the unemployment line. Based on original sources, the book explains how sport has been shaped and moulded by the major political and economic events of the past two centuries, such as the French Revolution, the rise of modern nationalism and imperialism, the Russian Revolution, the Cold War and the imposition of the neo-liberal agenda in the last decades of the twentieth century. It highlights the symbiotic relationship between the media and sport, from the simultaneous emergence of print capitalism and modern sport in Georgian England to the rise of Murdoch’s global satellite television empire in the twenty-first century, and for the first time it explores the alternative, revolutionary models of sport in the early twentieth century. Sport in a Capitalist Society is the first sustained attempt to explain the emergence of modern sport around the world as an integral part of the globalisation of capitalism. It is essential reading for anybody with an interest in the history or sociology of sport, or the social and cultural history of the modern world.

The Rise of Gridiron University

Higher Education's Uneasy Alliance with Big-time Football

Author: Brian M. Ingrassia

Publisher: Culture America (Hardcover)

ISBN: 9780700618309

Category: Education

Page: 322

View: 9978

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The most complete account to date of the origins of college football and its role in shaping the modern university. Traces the sport's evolution from a gentleman's pastime to a multi-million dollar enterprise that made athletics a permanent fixture on our nation's campuses and cemented college football's place in American culture.