Hell Gap

A Stratified Paleoindian Campsite at the Edge of the Rockies

Author: Mary Lou Larson,Marcel Kornfeld,George C. Frison

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780874809435

Category: History

Page: 444

View: 9114

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The Hell Gap site was first uncovered in the late 1950s and is one of the gems in the history of American archaeology. Yet it is still one of the least understood and most poorly published of the sites that helped establish the framework for Paleoindian archaeology as it exists today. No other excavated site in North America contains a record that includes all cultural complexes known on the Plains between 11,000 and 8,000 B.P. Major excavations during the 1960s, conducted by the University of Wyoming and Harvard's Peabody Museum, not only removed vast quantities of Paleoindian deposits, but also trained some of the foremost archaeologists of our time. Much has happened in American archaeology in the intervening years and modern techniques of dating, excavation, and analysis are now capable of revealing much more about the specifics of Hell Gap. This volume finally begins the analysis of the vast quantity of material recovered from one of the most significant Paleoindian sites in North America, as contributors consider such topics as settlement, subsistence, technology, paleoenvironments, and archaeological site formation. The studies included here expand our understanding of the results of the original investigators, while providing an important reevaluation of their interpretations.

Clovis Caches

Recent Discoveries and New Research

Author: Bruce B. Huckell

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 0826354831

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 4360

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This collection of essays investigates caches of Clovis tools, many of which have only recently come to light. The studies comprising this volume treat methodological and theoretical issues including the recognition of Clovis caches, Clovis lithic technology, mobility, and land use.

Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherers of the High Plains and Rockies

Third Edition

Author: Marcel Kornfeld,George C Frison,Mary Lou Larson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315422085

Category: Social Science

Page: 710

View: 6314

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George Frison’s Prehistoric Hunters of the High Plains has been the standard text on plains prehistory since its first publication in 1978, influencing generations of archaeologists. Now, a third edition of this classic work is available for scholars, students, and avocational archaeologists. Thorough and comprehensive, extensively illustrated, the book provides an introduction to the archaeology of the more than 13,000 year long history of the western Plains and the adjacent Rocky Mountains. Reflecting the boom in recent archaeological data, it reports on studies at a wide array of sites from deep prehistory to recent times examining the variability in the archeological record as well as in field, analytical, and interpretive methods. The 3rd edition brings the book up to date in a number of significant areas, as well as addressing several topics inadequately developed in previous editions.

The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Hunter-Gatherers

Author: Vicki Cummings,Peter Jordan,Marek Zvelebil

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191025275

Category: Social Science

Page: 1264

View: 6001

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For more than a century, the study of hunting and gathering societies has been central to the development of both archaeology and anthropology as academic disciplines, and has also generated widespread public interest and debate. The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Hunter-Gatherers provides a comprehensive review of hunter-gatherer studies to date, including critical engagements with older debates, new theoretical perspectives, and renewed obligations for greater engagement between researchers and indigenous communities. Chapters provide in-depth archaeological, historical, and anthropological case-studies, and examine far-reaching questions about human social relations, attitudes to technology, ecology, and management of resources and the environment, as well as issues of diet, health, and gender relations - all central topics in hunter-gatherer research, but also themes that have great relevance for modern global society and its future challenges. The Handbook also provides a strategic vision for how the integration of new methods, approaches, and study regions can ensure that future research into the archaeology and anthropology of hunter-gatherers will continue to deliver penetrating insights into the factors that underlie all human diversity.

Writing Archaeology, Second Edition

Telling Stories About the Past

Author: Brian Fagan

Publisher: Left Coast Press

ISBN: 1611326427

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 335

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Archaeology’s best known author of popular books and texts distills decades of experience in this well-received guide designed to help others wanting to broaden the audience for their work. Brian Fagan’s no nonsense approach explains how to get started writing, how to use the tools of experienced writers to make archaeology come alive, and how to get your work revised and finished. He also describes the process by which publishers decide to accept your work, and the path your publication will follow after it is accepted by a press. The new edition contains chapters on academic writing and on writing in the digital environment.

The First Rocky Mountaineers

Coloradans Before Colorado

Author: Marcel Kornfeld

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781607812623

Category: History

Page: 271

View: 8814

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Considers the human adaptation of the earliest people to inhabit Colorado's Middle Park

Aggregate Analysis in Chipped Stone

Author: Christopher T. Hall,Mary Lou Larson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 262

View: 7669

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Less than two decades ago, archaeologists considered lithic debitage, the flakes and debris left from the manufacture of stone tools, little more than uninformative waste. Since then, fieldworkers have increasingly recognized that stone flakes can provide information both singly and in aggregate. Many methods are now available for analyzing lithic debitage, yet no single method is entirely reliable as a vehicle to meaningful interpretation of past behavior. Part of the problem lies in the disparity between tightly controlled experimental conditions and the difficulty of sorting individual sequences out of the masses of stone found in many archaeological sites. Contributors to this volume seek to identify the strengths and weaknesses in the more widespread and competing analytical forms while arguing for the use of multiple lines of evidence. As the title indicates, their primary focus is on mass analysis of aggregates rather than individual flakes. Thus several chapters also address problems of subdividing aggregates to better deal with the "mixed assemblages" generated by multiple factors over time.

Rancher Archaeologist

A Career in Two Different Worlds

Author: George Frison,William Woodcock

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781607813293

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 2464

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Paleoindian Lifeways of the Cody Complex

Author: Edward J. Knell,Mark P. Muñiz

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781607812296

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 5982

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Paleoindian Lifeways of the Cody Complex represents the first synthesis in the more than fifty year history of one of the most important Paleoindian cultural traditions in North America. Research on the Cody complex (~10,000–8,000 radiocarbon yrs B.P.) began in the 1940s; however, until now publications have focused almost exclusively on specific sites, issues of projectile point technology and typology, and bison hunting. This volume provides fresh perspectives and cutting-edge research that significantly increases our understanding of the Cody complex by focusing more squarely on the human behaviors that created the archaeological record, rather than on more strictly technical aspects of the artifacts and faunal remains. Because the Cody complex extends from the central Canadian plains to the Gulf of Mexico and from Nevada to the eastern Great Lakes—making it second only to Clovis in geographical expanse—this volume will appeal to a wide range of North American archaeologists. Across this broad geographic distribution, the contributors address hunter-gatherer adaptive strategies from diverse ecosystems at the onset of the Holocene, which will also make it of interest to human ecologists and paleoenvironmental researchers. Paleoindian Lifeways of the Cody Complex provides an innovative synthesis of a well-known but little-studied cultural tradition that opens the door for a new generation of exciting research.

Islands on the Plains

Ecological, Social, and Ritual Use of Landscapes

Author: Marcel Kornfeld,Alan J. Osborn

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 331

View: 2464

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Scattered throughout the Great Plains are many isolated areas of varying size and ecology, quite distinct from the surrounding grasslands. Such spaces can be uplands like the Black Hills, low hills like the Nebraska Sand Hills, or linear areas such as shallow river valleys and deeply incised canyons. While the notion of "islands" is not a new one among ecologists, its application in Plains archaeology is. The contributors to this volume seek to illustrate the different ways that the spatial, structural, and temporal nature of islands conditioned the behavior and adaptation of past Plains peoples. This as a first step toward a more detailed analysis of habitat variation and its effects on Plains cultural dynamics and evolution. Although the emphasis is on ecology, several chapters also address social and ideological islands in the form of sacred sites and special hunting grounds.

The Agate Basin Site

A Record of the Paleoindian Occupation of the Northwestern High Plains

Author: George C. Frison,Dennis J. Stanford,Matthew Glenn Hill

Publisher: Percheron Press

ISBN: 9780989824903

Category: History

Page: 430

View: 5147

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The Agate Basin monograph is not only a classic of Plains paleoindian archaeology, but also of multidisciplinary research, geoarchaeology, zooarchaeology, and experimental archaeology. Lucid presentation of meticulously excavated and analyzed sediments, bones, and artifacts convey an unmatched sense of Paleoindian life.

The Allen Site

A Paleoindian Camp in Southwestern Nebraska

Author: Douglas B. Bamforth

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826342959

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 7355

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The Allen Site in southwestern Nebraska has nurtured the interest of archaeologists and paleontologists with abundant signs of a long history of human, animal, and environmental activity. Douglas Bamforth focuses primarily on Paleoindian land use represented by the Allen Site and the adjacent smaller sites collectively known as the Medicine Creek Paleoindian sites. The Medicine Creek sites, located in the central Great Plains, highlight aspects of early Native American lifeways that are obscured by the emphasis in most Paleoindian examinations of large bison kills. Research at Medicine Creek has stressed reconstruction of both the overall regional environment and of local microenvironmental variation, along with human responses to both of these. Advances in analysis and well-preserved remains from the Allen site in particular document the extraordinary range of species that Paleoindian groups harvested in addition to bison and open serious questions about widely accepted reconstructions of Paleoindian land use. In addition, the well-stratified evidence for long-term residential use of the site offers a rare chance to consider patterns of adaptive change over the course of the Paleoindian period.

The Early Settlement of North America

The Clovis Era

Author: Gary Haynes

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521524636

Category: History

Page: 345

View: 7721

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This history of the first people to settle in the New World starts with a summary of the archaeology of Clovis-fluted point-makers in North America. Gary Haynes evaluates the wide range of interpretations given to facts about the Clovis. He then presents his own fully developed and integrated theory, which incorporates vital new biological, ecological, behavioral and archaeological data.

Old Man's Playing ground

Author: Gabriel M. Yanicki

Publisher: University of Ottawa Press

ISBN: 077662136X

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 2473

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“A place here called Naw peu ooch eta cots from whence this river Derives its name…” When Hudson’s Bay Company surveyor Peter Fidler made contact with the Ktunaxa at the Gap of the Oldman River in the winter of 1792, his Piikáni guides brought him to the river’s namesake: these were the playing grounds where Napi, or Old Man, taught the various nations how to play a game as a way of making peace. In the centuries since, travellers, adventurers, and scholars have recorded several accounts of Old Man’s Playing Ground and of the hoop-and-arrow game that was played there. These same stories continue to be told, demonstrating the site’s core significance in the sacred geography of First Nations in southern Alberta today. In this work, oral tradition, history, and ethnography are brought together with a geomorphic assessment of the playing ground’s most probable location—a floodplain scoured and rebuilt by floodwaters of the Oldman—and the archaeology of adjacent prehistoric campsite DlPo-8. Taken together, the locale can be understood as a nexus for cultural interaction and trade, through the medium of gambling and games, on the natural frontier between peoples of the Interior Plateau and Northwest Plains.

Frontiers in Colorado Paleoindian Archaeology

From the Dent Site to the Rocky Mountains

Author: Robert H. Brunswig,Bonnie L. Pitblado

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1607323540

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 3554

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"Everything you might want to know about Paleoindians in Colorado."

Corridors to Extinction and the Australian Megafauna

Author: Steve Webb

Publisher: Newnes

ISBN: 0124078400

Category: Science

Page: 328

View: 5478

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Extinctions have always occurred and always will, so what is so surprising about the megafauna extinctions? They were caused by humans and were the first of many extinctions that eventually led to the extinction of the Moa, Steller's Sea Cow, the Dodo, Great Auk and countless other species great and small, all attributed to human agency. Therefore, the megafauna were humans’ first great impact on the planet. There is now an increasing realization that the 'blitzkrieg' view of these extinctions may have been wrong. A growing body of evidence and long-term field work is beginning to show that at least Australia's megafauna did not succumb to human agency, not because humans probably did not hunt the odd animal but because the an infinitely more logical reason lies in the climatic conditions of the Quaternary Ice Ages and the affect they had on continental geography, environment, climate and, most importantly, the biogeography of the megafauna. This book presents the evidence of this theory, demonstrating the biogeographic approach to Australia’s megafauna extinction. Written clearly to benefit a diverse level of readers, from those with a passing interest to professionals in the field. Examines future climate change and its effects on the planet by looking at examples buried in the past Presents new evidence from extensive field research