Healers and Healing in Early Modern Italy

Author: David Gentilcore

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719041990

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 1657

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Explores the wide range of healers and forms of healing in the southern half of the Italian peninsula that was the kingdom of Naples between 1600 and 1800. By adopting the point of view of the sick people themselves, it uncovers religious and popular ideas about disease and its causation and cures. The training, preparation and practice of all healers is discussed, against a backdrop of growing attempts by the medical and ecclesiastical elites to limit their activities within bounds considered acceptable.

Pastoral Drama and Healing in Early Modern Italy

Author: Federico Schneider

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317083385

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 2977

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Pastoral Drama and Healing in Early Modern Italy represents the first full-length study to confront seriously the well-rehearsed analogy of the pastoral poet as healer. Usually associated with the edifying function of the Renaissance pastoral, this analogy, if engaged more profoundly, raises a number of questions that remain unanswered to this day. How does the pastoral heal? How exactly do the inner workings of the text cater to the healing? What socio-cultural conventions make the healing possible? What are the major problems that pastoral poetry as mimesis must overcome to make its healing morally legitimate? In the wake of Derrida's seminal work on the Platonic pharmakon, which has in turn led recent criticism to formulate a much more concrete understanding of the theater/drug analogy, the stringent approach to the therapeutic function of the Renaissance pastoral offered in this work provides a valuable critical tool to unpack the complexity contained within a little-understood cliché.

Votive Panels and Popular Piety in Early Modern Italy

Author: Fredrika H. Jacobs

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107434165

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 9125

DOWNLOAD NOW »

In the late fifteenth century, votive panel paintings, or tavolette votive, began to accumulate around reliquary shrines and miracle-working images throughout Italy. Although often dismissed as popular art of little aesthetic consequence, more than 1,500 panels from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries are extant, a testimony to their ubiquity and importance in religious practice. Humble in both their materiality and style, they represent donors in prayer and supplicants petitioning a saint at a dramatic moment of crisis. In this book, Fredrika H. Jacobs traces the origins and development of the use of votive panels in this period. She examines the form, context and functional value of votive panels, and considers how they created meaning for the person who dedicated them as well as how they accrued meaning in relationship to other images and objects within a sacred space activated by practices of cultic culture.

The Historical Anthropology of Early Modern Italy

Essays on Perception and Communication

Author: Peter Burke

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521023672

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 3433

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Based on archival material from the cities of Genoa, Milan, Venice, Florence, Rome, and Naples, as well as on published sources, such as travel journals, and artistic representations, this volume presents an original view of the culture of early modern Italy. The book addresses particular themes - specifically those of perception and communication - as well as serving to exemplify modes of analysis in the currently developing field of historical anthropology. In the first part of the book, Peter Burke examines the stereotyped ways in which contemporaries perceived social groups such as saints, beggars, and working women, and shows how these stereotypes were used, consciously and unconsciously, both by the authorities and by ordinary people.

Early Modern Italy

A Social History

Author: Christopher Black

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134611277

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 6580

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Early Modern Italy is a fascinating survey of society in Italy from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries - the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Covering the whole of the Peninsula from the Venetian Republic, to Florence, through to Naples it shows how the huge economic, cultural and social divides of the period still affect the stability of present day united Italy. This is an essential guide to one of the most vibrant yet tempestuous periods of Italian history.

'On the Beliefs of the Greeks'

Leo Allatios and Popular Orthodoxy

Author: Karen Hartnup

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004131809

Category: Religion

Page: 370

View: 2200

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This book deals with popular Orthodoxy during the Byzantine and Ottoman periods, approaching the material from a historical and anthropological perspective. The discussion takes as its starting point a letter of Leo Allatios, the seventeenth-century author and scriptor of the Vatican Library. The early chapters of the book focus on Allatios and the western intellectual background in which the work was written, while later chapters consider popular beliefs and practices surrounding childstealing demons, revenants, spirits of place and popular healing. This book provides the first detailed treatment of a major source for post Byzantine popular Orthodoxy, offering valuable insights into the relationships between laity and clergy, Orthodoxy and Catholicism, religion and natural philosophy during the seventeenth century.

Plague Hospitals

Public Health for the City in Early Modern Venice

Author: Dr Jane L Stevens Crawshaw

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409471101

Category: Medical

Page: 338

View: 4739

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Developed throughout early modern Europe, lazaretti, or plague hospitals, took on a central role in early modern responses to epidemic disease, in particular the prevention and treatment of plague. The lazaretti served as isolation hospitals, quarantine centres, convalescent homes, cemeteries, and depots for the disinfection or destruction of infected goods. The first permanent example of this institution was established in Venice in 1423 and between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries tens of thousands of patients passed through the doors. Founded on lagoon islands, the lazaretti tell us about the relationship between the city and its natural environment. The plague hospitals also illustrate the way in which medical structures in Venice intersected with those of piety and poor relief and provided a model for public health which was influential across Europe. This is the first detailed study of how these plague hospitals functioned, where they were situated, who worked there, what it was like to stay there, and how many people survived. Comparisons are made between the Venetian lazaretti and similar institutions in Padua, Verona and other Italian and European cities. Centred on the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, during which time there were both serious plague outbreaks in Europe and periods of relative calm, the book explores what the lazaretti can tell us about early modern medicine and society and makes a significant contribution to both Venetian history and our understanding of public health in early modern Europe, engaging with ideas of infection and isolation, charity and cure, dirt, disease and death.

Medicine and Magic in Elizabethan London

Simon Forman : Astrologer, Alchemist, and Physician

Author: Lauren Kassell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199279050

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 5590

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Simon Forman (1552-1611) is one of London's most infamous astrologers. He stood apart from the medical elite because he was not formally educated and because he represented, and boldly asserted, medical ideas that were antithetical to those held by most learned physicians. He survived theplague, was consulted thousands of times a year for medical and other questions, distilled strong waters made from beer, herbs, and sometimes chemical ingredients, pursued the philosopher's stone in experiments and ancient texts, and when he was fortunate spoke with angels. He wrote compulsively,documenting his life and protesting his expertise in thousands of pages of notes and treatises. This highly readable book provides the first full account of Forman's papers, makes sense of his notorious reputation, and vividly recovers the world of medicine and magic in Elizabethan London.

Medical Charlatanism in Early Modern Italy

Author: David Gentilcore

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199245355

Category: History

Page: 426

View: 5282

DOWNLOAD NOW »

From the mid-sixteenth century onwards, the Italian Protomedicato tribunals, Colleges of Physicians, or Health Offices (jurisdiction varied from state to state) required charlatans to submit their wares for inspection and, upon approval, pay a licence fee in order to set up a stage from which to perform and sell them. The licensing of charlatans became an administrative routine. As far as the medical magistracies were concerned, charlatans had a defineable identity, constituting a specific trade or occupation. This book studies the way charlatans were represented, by contemporaries and by historians, how they saw themselves and, most importantly, it reconstructs the place of charlatans in early modern Italy. It explores the goods and services charlatans provided, their dealings with the public and their marketing strategies. It does so from a range of perspectives: social, cultural, economic, political, geographical, biographical and, of course, medical. Charlatans are not just some curiosity on the fringes of medicine: they offered health care to an extraordinarily wide sector of the population. Moreover, from their origins in Renaissance Italy, the Italian ciarlatano was the prototype for itinerant medical practitioners throughout Europe. This book offers a different look at charlatans. It is the first to take seriously the licences issued to charlatans in the Italian states, compiling them into a 'charlatans database' of over 1,300 charlatans active throughout Italy over the course of some three centuries. In addition, it makes use of other types of archival documents, such as trial records and wills, to give the charlatans a human face, as well as a wide range of artistic and printed sources, not forgetting the output of the charlatans themselves, in the form of handbills and pamphlets.

Medicine, Government and Public Health in Philip II's Spain

Shared Interests, Competing Authorities

Author: Dr Michele L Clouse

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409482766

Category: Medical

Page: 218

View: 9386

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Bridging the gap between histories of medicine and political/institutional histories of the early modern crown, this book explores the relationship between one of the most highly bureaucratic regimes in early modern Europe, Spain, and crown interest in and regulation of medical practices. Complementing recent histories that have emphasized the interdependent nature of governance between the crown and municipalities in sixteenth-century Spain, this study argues that medical policies were the result of negotiation and cooperation among the crown, the towns, and medical practitioners. During the reign of Philip II (1556-1598), the crown provided unique opportunities for advancements in the medical field among practitioners and support for the creation and dissemination of innovative medical techniques. In addition, crown support for and regulation of medicine served as an important bureaucratic tool in the crown's effort to expand and solidify its authority over the distinct kingdoms and territories under Castilian authority and the municipalities within the kingdom of Castile itself. The crown was not the only agent of change in the medical world, however. Medical policies and their successful implementation required consensus and cooperation among competing political authorities. Bringing to life a cast of characters from early modern Spain, from the female empiric who practiced bonesetting and surgery to the university-trained, Latin physician whose medical textbook standardized medical education in the universities, the book will broaden the scope of medical history to include not only the development of medical theory and innovative practice, but also address the complex tensions between various authorities which influenced the development and nature of medical practice and perceptions of 'public health' in early modern Europe. Juxtaposing the history of medicine with the history of early modern state-building brings a unique perspective to this challenging book that reassesses the relationship between the monarch and intellectual milieu of medicine in Spain. It further challenges the dominance of studies of medical regulation from France and England and illuminates a diverse and innovative world of Spanish medical practice that has been neglected in standard histories of early modern medicine.

Contracting a Cure

Patients, Healers, and the Law in Early Modern Bologna

Author: Gianna Pomata

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780801858581

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 3739

DOWNLOAD NOW »

In Contracting a Cure, Gianna Pomata tells the hitherto unknown story of a fundamental shift in the relationship between healers and patients in early modern Europe. Using a wide array of sources - including the rich archives of Bologna's College of Medicine and legal records from several European countriesPomata explores the tradition of the "agreement for a cure" whereby the practitioner was contractually bound to heal the sick person within a specified period and for a stipulated sum. If the patient was not cured, he or she had a legal right to reclaim from the practitioner any money advanced for the cure. The author argues that such contracts implied a "horizontal model" of healing that gave considerable power to patients and that, in consequence, was a serious hindrance to the growing power of the medical profession. The book shows how the "agreement for a cure" disappeared by the end of the early modern period precisely because of the determined opposition of physicians and jurists, who realized that payment by results was incompatible with the professionalization of medicine.

Marchands et consommateurs

les mutations de l'Europe moderne

Author: Bruno Blondé

Publisher: Université Francois Rabelais

ISBN: 9782869062115

Category: Retail trade

Page: 259

View: 8770

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Ludica

annali di storia e civiltà del gioco

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Sports

Page: N.A

View: 4655

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Nuncius

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: N.A

View: 2733

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Annali di storia della scienza.

Plagues, Poisons, and Potions

Plague-spreading Conspiracies in the Western Alps, C. 1530-1640

Author: William G. Naphy

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780719046407

Category: History

Page: 242

View: 9328

DOWNLOAD NOW »

With the 16th and 17th Century outbreaks of the Plague, came the arrests and executions of many hospital workers who were accused of conspiring to spread the disease. "Plagues, Poisons and Potions" contains a detailed study of this fascinating phenomenon associated with the Plague. It examines the courts and the part played by torture, as well as considering the socio-economic conditions of the workers, highlighting an early modern form of 'class warfare'.

Women and the Practice of Medical Care in Early Modern Europe, 1400-1800

Author: L. Whaley

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230295177

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 5643

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Women have engaged in healing from the beginning of history, often within the context of the home. This book studies the role, contributions and challenges faced by women healers in France, Spain, Italy and England, including medical practice among women in the Jewish and Muslim communities, from the later Middle Ages to approximately 1800.