Gordon R. Willey and American Archaeology

Contemporary Perspectives

Author: Jeremy A. Sabloff,William Leonard Fash

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806138053

Category: Social Science

Page: 252

View: 8833

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Gauging the impact of one scholar's contributions to modern archaeology

Method and Theory in American Archaeology

Author: Gordon Willey,Philip Phillips

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817310886

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 6515

DOWNLOAD NOW »

A Dan Josselyn Memorial Publication This invaluable classic provides the framework for the development of American archaeology during the last half of the 20th century. In 1958 Gordon R. Willey and Philip Phillips first published Method and Theory in American Archaeology— a volume that went through five printings, the last in 1967 at the height of what became known as the new, or processual, archaeology. The advent of processual archaeology, according to Willey and Phillips, represented a "theoretical debate . . . a question of whether archaeology should be the study of cultural history or the study of cultural process." Willey and Phillips suggested that little interpretation had taken place in American archaeology, and their book offered an analytical perspective; the methods they described and the structural framework they used for synthesizing American prehistory were all geared toward interpretation. Method and Theory served as the catalyst and primary reader on the topic for over a decade. This facsimile reprint edition of the original University of Chicago Press volume includes a new foreword by Gordon R. Willey, which outlines the state of American archaeology at the time of the original publication, and a new introduction by the editors to place the book in historical context. The bibliography is exhaustive. Academic libraries, students, professionals, and knowledgeable amateurs will welcome this new edition of a standard-maker among texts on American archaeology.

A History of American Archaeology

Author: Gordon Randolph Willey,Jeremy A. Sabloff

Publisher: W H Freeman & Company

ISBN: 9780716723714

Category: America

Page: 384

View: 7351

DOWNLOAD NOW »

**** New edition of a textbook that, in its second edition (1980), was cited in BCL3. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Archeology of the Florida Gulf Coast

Author: Gordon Randolph Willey

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813016030

Category: History

Page: 599

View: 5153

DOWNLOAD NOW »

"By the end of 1950, only about a dozen publications in American archaeology might be said to stand as monumental contributions from the points of view of prodigious industry, presentation of new data, good organization, balanced interpretation, and clear writing. Of these, the reviewer regards Gordon Willey's great volume on the Florida Gulf Coast as perhaps the best of all."--American Antiquity "Gordon Willey's Archeology of the Florida Gulf Coast literally set the agenda for archaeological research in north Florida. . . . It forms the basis for our understanding of the prehistoric period in this area. . . . It is impossible to do research in the Gulf Coast region without it."--Charles R. Ewen, East Carolina University Fifty years after its first publication by the Smithsonian Institution, this landmark work is back in print. Written by the dean of North and South American archaeologists, Gordon Willey, the book initially marked a new phase in archaeological research. It continues to offer a major synthesis of the archaeology of the Florida Gulf Coast, with complete descriptions and illustrations of all the pottery types found in the area. The book contains data that remain indispensable to archaeologists working in every region or state east of the Mississippi River. Nowhere else can the reader find as compact, and at the same time as detailed, a summary of the numerous ceramic types upon which Gulf Florida archaeological chronology is based. It includes an overview of all the work early archaeologists did in the area from the 1800s up through the time of the federal relief archaeology programs of the 1930s, and it has become the foundation upon which all subsequent research in the Gulf area has been constructed. Gordon R. Willey, Bowditch Professor Emeritus of Harvard University, is former curator of anthropology at the Harvard Peabody Museum.

Travels and Archaeology in South Chile

Author: Junius B. Bird,Margaret Bird,John Hyslop

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 1587290146

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 2646

DOWNLOAD NOW »

"This is a remarkable book by one of the true geniuses in the field of anthropology during this century and one who provided valuable data for specialists in other disciplines as well."--H. M. Wormington "An engaging manuscript that should charm a broad audience."--Thomas F. Lynch "The field notes of Junius, and Peggy's diary, are valuable records of the excavations, artifacts, and interpretations of the best archaeologists to work in the southern tip of South America."--James G. Griffin Junius Bird's three great archaeological field achievements--at the Strait of Magellan in Chilean Patagonia, in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, and at the sites of early coastal dwellers in northern Peru--made his reputation as a New World prehistorian. His work in south Chile is especially important, since it established the great antiquity of human populations in South America. Until now, most of Bird's Chilean data remained unpublished, but this rich collection of field notebooks from his 1936 and 1937 excavations makes this primary information available for the first time. Included in this volume are new data from Bird's excavations at Palli Aike, Fell's Cave, and Cañadon Leona as well as Cerro Sota and Mylodon caves. Excerpts from his published articles plus contributions by Juliet Clutton-Brock and Vera Markgraf reinforce the book with major new information about these truly pioneering investigations. Complementing the technical data are excerpts from the field journal kept by Margaret (Peggy) Bird. Witty, charming, and personable, her writings convey the more human aspects of Bird's research while interpreting his theoretical ideas. Finally, the many photographs taken by the Birds add a striking visual dimension to this volume. The Birds' fieldwork took place under conditions, and with a spirit, vastly different from those of most researchers today. The texts and teamwork revealed in Travels and Archaeology in South Chilewill appeal to everyone concerned with the heavily debated question of earliest peopling in the Americas, with South American anthropology and archaeology, and with the days when archaeology truly meant exploration. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Background and Departure Overview South Chile and the Canoe Indians Daily Life Sailing the Channels 2. Chronological Synthesis and Dating The Periods The Radiocarbon Dates 3. Canadon Leona General Description Excavation Information The Artifacts Faunal Remains Possible Age of Deposit Burials Summary Daily Life 4. Palli Aike General Description Excavation in Two Phases Excavation Information The Artifacts Possible Age of Deposit Faunal Remains Human Remains Daily Life 5. Fell's Cave General Description Excavation Information, 1936-1937 The Artifacts Faunal Remains Daily Life Excavations by John Fell and the French Mission Excavations, 1969-1970 The Carnivore Remains Excavated at Fell's Cave in 1970. By Juliet Clutton-Brock Fell's Cave: 11,000 Years of Changes in Paleoenvironments, Fauna, and Human Occupation. By Vera Markgraf 6. Cerro Sota Cave General Description Excavation Information The Artifacts Faunal Remains A Group Burial Probable Dating of the Deposit Daily Life 7. Mylodon Cave Background Structure of the Floor Deposit Results and Conclusions Human Remains Sloth Skin Broken or "Cut" Bone Domestication of the Sloth Summary of Evidence Age of Remains Two Additional Specimens

The Sounds and Colors of Power

The Sacred Metallurgical Technology of Ancient West Mexico

Author: Dorothy Hosler

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262082303

Category: Social Science

Page: 310

View: 5505

DOWNLOAD NOW »

"This major study suggests that prehispanic metallurgy was adopted in western Mexico ca. AD 600 from northern South America. Presents technical analyses and a comprehensive theory for development of Mesoamerican metallurgy. Argues that metals were a ritual and elite material that expressed sacredness and social relations"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 57.

Handbook of South American Archaeology

Author: Helaine Silverman,William Isbell

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780387752280

Category: Social Science

Page: 1192

View: 5154

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Perhaps the contributions of South American archaeology to the larger field of world archaeology have been inadequately recognized. If so, this is probably because there have been relatively few archaeologists working in South America outside of Peru and recent advances in knowledge in other parts of the continent are only beginning to enter larger archaeological discourse. Many ideas of and about South American archaeology held by scholars from outside the area are going to change irrevocably with the appearance of the present volume. Not only does the Handbook of South American Archaeology (HSAA) provide immense and broad information about ancient South America, the volume also showcases the contributions made by South Americans to social theory. Moreover, one of the merits of this volume is that about half the authors (30) are South Americans, and the bibliographies in their chapters will be especially useful guides to Spanish and Portuguese literature as well as to the latest research. It is inevitable that the HSAA will be compared with the multi-volume Handbook of South American Indians (HSAI), with its detailed descriptions of indigenous peoples of South America, that was organized and edited by Julian Steward. Although there are heroic archaeological essays in the HSAI, by the likes of Junius Bird, Gordon Willey, John Rowe, and John Murra, Steward states frankly in his introduction to Volume Two that “arch- ology is included by way of background” to the ethnographic chapters.

Handbook of Middle American Indians, Volume 4

Archaeological Frontiers and External Connections

Author: Gordon F. Ekholm,Gordon R. Willey

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 1477306587

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 4465

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Archaeological Frontiers and External Connections is the fourth volume in the Handbook of Middle American Indians, published in cooperation with the Middle American Research Institute of Tulane University under the general editorship of Robert Wauchope (1909–1979). Volume editors are Gordon R. Willey (1913–2002), Bowditch Professor of Mexican and Central American Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University, and Gordon F. Ekholm (1909–1987), Associate Curator of Mexican Archaeology of the American Museum of Natural History in New York. This volume presents an intensive study of matters of significance in various areas: archaeology and ethnohistory of the Northern Sierra, Sonora, Lower California, and northeastern Mexico; external relations between Mesoamerica and the southwestern United States and eastern United States; archaeology and ethnohistory of El Salvador, western Honduras, and lower Central America; external relations between Mesoamerica and the Caribbean area, Ecuador, and the Andes; and the case for and against Old World pre-Columbian contacts via the Pacific. Many photographs accompany the text. The Handbook of Middle American Indians was assembled and edited at the Middle American Research Institute of Tulane University with the assistance of grants from the National Science Foundation and under the sponsorship of the National Research Council Committee on Latin American Anthropology.

Maya Archaeology and Ethnohistory

Author: Norman Hammond,Gordon R. Willey

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 029274109X

Category: Social Science

Page: 310

View: 8764

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Embracing a wide range of research, this book offers various views on the intellectual history of Maya archaeology and ethnohistory and the processes operating in the rise and fall of Maya civilization. The fourteen studies were selected from those presented at the Second Cambridge Symposium on Recent Research in Mesoamerican Archaeology and are presented in three major sections. The first of these deals with the application of theory, both anthropological and historical, to the great civilization of the Classic Maya, which flourished in the Yucatan, Guatemala, and Belize during the first millennium A.D. The structural remains of the Classic Period have impressed travelers and archaeologists for over a century, and aspects of the development and decline of this strange and brilliant tropical forest culture are examined here in the light of archaeological research. The second section presents the results of field research ranging from the Highlands of Mexico east to Honduras and north into the Lowland heart of Maya civilization, and iconographic study of excavated material. The third section covers the ethnohistoric approach to archaeology, the conjunction of material and documentary evidence. Early European documents are used to illuminate historic Maya culture. This section includes transcriptions of previously unpublished archival material. Although not formally linked beyond their common field of inquiry, the essays here offer a conspectus of late-twentieth century Maya research and a series of case histories of the work of some of the leading scholars in the field.

Ruins and Rivals

The Making of Southwest Archaeology

Author: James E. Snead

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816523979

Category: Social Science

Page: 226

View: 1223

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Published in cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University Ruins are as central to the image of the American Southwest as are its mountains and deserts, and antiquity is a key element of modern southwestern heritage. Yet prior to the mid-nineteenth century this rich legacy was largely unknown to the outside world. While military expeditions first brought word of enigmatic relics to the eastern United States, the new intellectual frontier was seized by archaeologists, who used the results of their southwestern explorations to build a foundation for the scientific study of the American past. In Ruins and Rivals, James Snead helps us understand the historical development of archaeology in the Southwest from the 1890s to the 1920s and its relationship with the popular conception of the region. He examines two major research traditions: expeditions dispatched from the major eastern museums and those supported by archaeological societies based in the Southwest itself. By comparing the projects of New York's American Museum of Natural History with those of the Southwest Museum in Los Angeles and the Santa Fe-based School of American Archaeology, he illustrates the way that competition for status and prestige shaped the way that archaeological remains were explored and interpreted. The decades-long competition between institutions and their advocates ultimately created an agenda for Southwest archaeology that has survived into modern times. Snead takes us back to the days when the field was populated by relic hunters and eastern "museum men" who formed uneasy alliances among themselves and with western boosters who used archaeology to advance their own causes. Richard Wetherill, Frederic Ward Putnam, Charles Lummis, and other colorful characters all promoted their own archaeological endeavors before an audience that included wealthy patrons, museum administrators, and other cultural figures. The resulting competition between scholarly and public interests shifted among museum halls, legislative chambers, and the drawing rooms of Victorian America but always returned to the enigmatic ruins of Chaco Canyon, Bandelier, and Mesa Verde. Ruins and Rivals contains a wealth of anecdotal material that conveys the flavor of digs and discoveries, scholars and scoundrels, tracing the origins of everything from national monuments to "Santa Fe Style." It rekindles the excitement of discovery, illustrating the role that archaeology played in creating the southwestern "past" and how that image of antiquity continues to exert its influence today.

Handbook of Middle American Indians, Volumes 2 and 3

Archaeology of Southern Mesoamerica

Author: Gordon R. Willey

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 1477306552

Category: Social Science

Page: 1098

View: 1522

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Archaeology of Southern Mesoamerica comprises the second and third volumes in the Handbook of Middle American Indians, published in cooperation with the Middle American Research Institute of Tulane University under the general editorship of Robert Wauchope (1909–1979). The volume editor is Gordon R. Willey (1913–2002), Bowditch Professor of Mexican and Central American Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University. Volumes Two and Three, with more than 700 illustrations, contain archaeological syntheses, followed by special articles on settlement patterns, architecture, funerary practices, ceramics, artifacts, sculpture, painting, figurines, jades, textiles, minor arts, calendars, hieroglyphic writing, and native societies at the time of the Spanish conquest of the Guatemala highlands, the southern Maya lowlands, the Pacific coast of Guatemala, Chiapas, the upper Grijalva basin, southern Veracruz, Tabasco, and Oaxaca. The Handbook of Middle American Indians was assembled and edited at the Middle American Research Institute of Tulane University with the assistance of grants from the National Science Foundation and under the sponsorship of the National Research Council Committee on Latin American Anthropology.

Measuring the Flow of Time

The Works of James A. Ford, 1935-1941

Author: James A. Ford

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817309918

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 582

View: 4832

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This collection of Ford's works focuses on the development of ceramic chronology—a key tool in Americanist archaeology.

New Perspectives on the Origins of Americanist Archaeology

Author: David L Browman,Stephen Williams

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817311289

Category: Social Science

Page: 378

View: 1552

DOWNLOAD NOW »

In this landmark book, experienced scholars take a retrospective look at the developing routes that have brought American archaeologists into the 21st century. In 1996, the Society for American Archaeology's Committee on the History of Archaeology established a biennial symposium named after Gordon R. Willey, one of the fathers of American archaeology, to focus on the history of the discipline. This volume grew out of the second symposium, presented at the 1998 meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Interest in the intellectual history of the field is certainly nothing new-the first such volume appeared in 1856-but previously, focus has been on individuals and their theories and methods, or on various government agencies that supported, developed, or mandated excavations in North America. This volume, however, focuses on the roots of Americanist archaeology, including its pre-1915 European connections, and on some of the earliest work by women archaeologists, which has been largely overlooked. Full of valuable insights for archaeologists and anthropologists—both professional and amateur—into the history and development of Americanist archaeology, New Perspectives will also inspire and serve as a model for future research. David Browman is Professor of Anthropology and Chair of the Interdisciplinary Program in Archaeology at Washington University. Stephen Williams is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Harvard University.

Handbook of Middle American Indians, Volumes 2 and 3

Archaeology of Southern Mesoamerica

Author: Gordon R. Willey

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 1477306579

Category: Social Science

Page: 1098

View: 4495

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Archaeology of Southern Mesoamerica comprises the second and third volumes in the Handbook of Middle American Indians, published in cooperation with the Middle American Research Institute of Tulane University under the general editorship of Robert Wauchope (1909–1979). The volume editor is Gordon R. Willey (1913–2002), Bowditch Professor of Mexican and Central American Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University. Volumes Two and Three, with more than 700 illustrations, contain archaeological syntheses, followed by special articles on settlement patterns, architecture, funerary practices, ceramics, artifacts, sculpture, painting, figurines, jades, textiles, minor arts, calendars, hieroglyphic writing, and native societies at the time of the Spanish conquest of the Guatemala highlands, the southern Maya lowlands, the Pacific coast of Guatemala, Chiapas, the upper Grijalva basin, southern Veracruz, Tabasco, and Oaxaca. The Handbook of Middle American Indians was assembled and edited at the Middle American Research Institute of Tulane University with the assistance of grants from the National Science Foundation and under the sponsorship of the National Research Council Committee on Latin American Anthropology.

Classic Maya Political History

Hieroglyphic and Archaeological Evidence

Author: T. Patrick Culbert

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521564458

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 3117

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This volume is the first to present in detail the results of recent decipherment of Maya hieroglyphic writing and to consider the implications of a Classic Maya written history. Contributors examine the way in which the Maya elite created the kinship, alliance, warfare and ceremonial networks on which the civilization was founded.

The Great Archaeologists

Author: Brian M. Fagan

Publisher: Thames & Hudson

ISBN: 0500772371

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 4010

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The story of how lost civilizations, buried cities, and ancient scripts were rediscovered for the modern age, as seen through the lives and exploits of the great archaeologists who made these phenomenal finds The Great Archaeologists takes the reader on a journey from the first attempt to establish just how ancient the "ancient past" really was, through the revelatory discovery of lost civilizations and unknown cultures, right up to today’s search for explanations about the past. We meet Thomsen and Worsaae, Danish researchers and rivals, and Sanz de Sautuola and Abbé Breuil, who astonished the world with their discoveries of cave art. Controversial figures such as Heinrich Schliemann and the Hungarian Aurel Stein, plunderer of ancient manuscripts from Central Asia, are given new assessments. Little-known pioneers such as Max Uhle in Peru and Li Chi in China are set beside the giants in the field—from Koldewey, Dörpfeld, and Woolley in the Near East, to Louis and Mary Leakey, who transformed knowledge of our African ancestry. Other indomitable women include Gertrude Bell, Kathleen Kenyon, and the script-decipherer Tatiana Proskouriakoff. Brian Fagan has assembled a team of some of the world’s greatest living archaeologists to write knowledgeably and entertainingly about their distinguished predecessors in this handsome volume, full of fascinating anecdotes, personal accounts, and unexpected insights.