Europe and the Other and Europe as the Other

Author: Bo Stråth

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9789052016504

Category: History

Page: 517

View: 5757

This book contributes to the debate on what Europe means by demonstrating the complexities and contradictions inherent in the concept. They are seen most clearly when Europe is viewed from a long historical perspective. During the closing decades of the twentieth century Europe emerged as one of the main points of reference in both the cultural and the political constructs of the global community. An obsession with the concept of European identity is readily discernible. This process of identity construction provokes critical questions which the book aims to address. At the same time the book explores the opportunities offered by the concept of Europe to see how it may be used in the construction of the future. The approach is one of both deconstruction and reconstruction. The issue of Europe is closely related in the book to more general issues concerning the cultural construction of community. The book should therefore be seen as the companion of "Myth and Memory in the Construction of Community," which is also published by PIE-Peter Lang in the series Multiple Europes. The book appears within the framework of a research project on the cultural construction of community in modernisation processes in comparison. This project is a joint enterprise of the European University Institute in Florence and the Humboldt University in Berlin sponsored by the Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Fund.

The Other Europe

Eastern Europe to 1945

Author: E. Garrison Walters

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815624400

Category: History

Page: 430

View: 3354

The Fault Line

Traveling the Other Europe, from Finland to Ukraine

Author: Paolo Rumiz

Publisher: Rizzoli Publications

ISBN: 0847845451

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 5661

An award-winning writer travels the eastern front of Europe, where the push/pull between old empires and new possibilities has never been more evident. Paolo Rumiz traces the path that has twice cut Europe in two—first by the Iron Curtain and then by the artificial scaffolding of the EU—moving through vibrant cities and abandoned villages, some places still gloomy under the ghost of these imposing borders, some that have sought to erase all memory of it and jump with both feet into the West (if only the West would have them). In The Fault Line, he is a sublime and lively guide through these unfamiliar landscapes, piecing together an atlas that has been erased by modern states, delighting in the discovery of communities that were once engulfed by geopolitics then all but forgotten, until now.The farther south he goes, the more he feels he is traveling not along some abandoned Eastern frontier, but right in the middle of things: Mitteleuropa wasn’t to be found in Viennese cafés but much farther east, beyond even Budapest and Warsaw. As in Ukraine, these remain places in flux, where the political and cultural values of the East and West have stared each other down for centuries. Rumiz gives a human face not just to what the Cold War left behind but to the ancient ties of empire and ethnicity that are still at the root of modern politics in flash-point areas such as this.

France and the Construction of Europe, 1944-2007

The Geopolitical Imperative

Author: Michael Sutton

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857452908

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 366

View: 1530

In the second half of the twentieth century France played the greatest role - even greater than Germany’s - in shaping what eventually became the European Union. By the early twenty-first century, however, in a hugely transformed Europe, this era had patently come to an end. This comprehensive history shows how France coupled the pursuit of power and the furtherance of European integration over a sixty-year period, from the close of the Second World War to the hesitation caused by the French electorate’s referendum rejection of the European Union’s constitutional treaty in 2005.

Europe as the Other

External Perspectives on European Christianity

Author: Judith Becker,Brian Stanley

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN: 3525101317

Category: Religion

Page: 277

View: 3600

From high esteem to rejection: How non-Europeans viewed European Christianity.

On the Road to Babadag

Travels in the Other Europe

Author: Andrzej Stasiuk

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 0547549121

Category: Travel

Page: 272

View: 8827

Journey through Poland, Ukraine, Slovenia, and other places neglected by tourists, with “an accomplished stylist with an eye for telling detail” (Irvine Welsh). Andrzej Stasiuk is a restless and indefatigable traveler. By car, train, bus, and ferry, he goes from his native Poland to Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Slovenia, Albania, Moldova, and Ukraine—to small towns and villages with strangely evocative names. “The heart of my Europe,” he tells us, “beats in Sokolów Podlaski and in Huși. It does not beat in Vienna.” In Comrat, a funeral procession moves slowly down the main street, the open coffin on a pickup truck, an old woman dressed in black brushing away the flies above the face of the deceased. In Soroca, he locates a baroque-Byzantine-Tatar-Turkish encampment, to meet Gypsies. And all the way to Babadag, between the Baltic Coast and the Black Sea, Stasiuk indulges his curiosity and his love for the forgotten places and people of Europe. “There isn’t quite a name for the region that holds the Polish writer Andrzej Stasiuk in thrall. The general drift is from ‘the land of King Ubu to the land of Count Dracula’, Poland to Romania. . . . Its nucleus is the landlocked centre of Central Europe; its protoplasm spreads like an amoeba through the Balkans. It cannot be convincingly mapped. . . . As travel writing, this is unconventional, but as literature profoundly authentic.” —The Independent (UK) “A mesmerizing, not-to-be-missed trek through a little-visited region of the world.” —Kirkus Reviews “A eulogy for the old Europe, the Europe both in and out of time, the Europe now lost in the folds of the map.” —The Guardian (UK)

The End of Europe

Dictators, Demagogues, and the Coming Dark Age

Author: James Kirchick

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300227787

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 1868

Once the world’s bastion of liberal, democratic values, Europe is now having to confront demons it thought it had laid to rest. The old pathologies of anti-Semitism, populist nationalism, and territorial aggression are threatening to tear the European postwar consensus apart. In riveting dispatches from this unfolding tragedy, James Kirchick shows us the shallow disingenuousness of the leaders who pushed for “Brexit;” examines how a vast migrant wave is exacerbating tensions between Europeans and their Muslim minorities; explores the rising anti-Semitism that causes Jewish schools and synagogues in France and Germany to resemble armed bunkers; and describes how Russian imperial ambitions are destabilizing nations from Estonia to Ukraine. With President Trump now threatening to abandon America's traditional role as upholder of the liberal world order and guarantor of the continent's security, Europe may be alone in dealing with these unprecedented challenges. Based on extensive firsthand reporting, this book is a provocative, disturbing look at a continent in unexpected crisis.

The Meanings of Europe

Changes and Exchanges of a Contested Concept

Author: Claudia Wiesner,Meike Schmidt-Gleim

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134458452

Category: Social Science

Page: 266

View: 9405

What is Europe? What are the contents of the concept of Europe? And what defines European identity? Instead of only asking these classical questions, this volume also explores who asks these questions, and who is addressed with such questions. Who answers the questions, from which standpoints and for what reasons? Which philosophical, historical, religious or political traditions influence the answers? This book addresses its task in three parts. The first concentrates on the controversies around the meaning of Europe. The second focuses on the role of the European Union. The third discusses Europe and its relations to different types of otherness, or rather, non-European-ness. The volume produces a complex and plural picture of the concepts, ideas, debates and (ex)changes associated with the concept of Europe, and has a clear significance for today’s debates on European identity, Europeanization, and the EU.

Discourse Theory in European Politics

Identity, Policy and Governance

Author: D. Howarth,J. Torfing

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230523366

Category: Political Science

Page: 364

View: 8671

This volume of essays employs discourse theory to analyze mainstream topics in contemporary European politics. Inspired by developments in post-structuralist, psychoanalytic and post-Marxist theory, each contributor problematizes a central issue in European governance, including European security, Third Way politics, constitutional and administrative reform, new forms of nationalism and populism, the shift from welfare to workfare, environmental politics and local government. Alongside these substantive issues, the book tackles questions raised by the difficulties of applying discourse theory to empirical cases.

Islam in Europe

Author: Jack Goody

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0745657559

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 5105

This vigorously argued book reveals the central role that Islam has played in European history. Following the movement of people, culture and religion from East to West, Goody breaks down the perceived opposition between Islam and Europe, showing Islam to be a part of Europe's past and present. In an historical analysis of religious warfare and forced migration, Goody examines our understanding of legitimate violence, ethnic cleansing and terrorism. His comparative perspective offers important and illuminating insights into current political problems and conflicts. Goody traces three routes of Islam into Europe, following the Arab through North Africa, Spain and Mediterranean Europe; the Turk through Greece and the Balkans; and the Mongol through Southern Russia to Poland and Lithuania. Each thrust made its mark on Europe in terms of population and culture. Yet this was not merely a military impact: especially in Spain, but elsewhere too, Europe was substantially modified by this contact. Today it takes the form of some eleven million immigrants, not to speak of the possible incorporation of further millions through Bosnia, Albania and Turkey.

Modernism and the New Spain

Britain, Cosmopolitan Europe, and Literary History

Author: Gayle Rogers

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199914974

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 283

View: 7131

How could a country seen as remote, backwards, and barely European become a pivotal site for reinventing the continent after the devastation of the Great War? Modernism and the New Spain argues that the "Spanish problem" - Spain's historically troubled relationship with Europe, from the Moorish invasions through the Inquisition to the twentieth century - animated a wide range of overlooked modernist formulations of cosmopolitanism. Gayle Rogers reconstructs an archive of cross-cultural collaborations that aimed to resolve these matters in order to demonstrate the surprising mutual constitution of two modernist movements - one in Britain, the other in Spain, and stretching at key moments to Ireland and the Americas. Writers including T. S. Eliot, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and Stephen Spender and a circle of their Spanish peers led by the philosopher Jose Ortega y Gasset cooperated to attach a host of cultural agendas to the rebirth of a European Spain as a microcosm for the emergence of a new continent. Their vision of Spain as the convergence of Europe's geographical, political, racial, and gendered margins culminated during the Spanish Civil War. Drawing on transnational literary studies, periodical studies, translation studies, and comparative literary history, Modernism and the New Spain illuminates why Spain has remained a problematic space on the scholarly map of international modernisms. Rogers synthesizes works of writers who were presumed to have little contact and to be separated by Europe's traditional divisions (North/South, Germanic/Latin, and expanding/declining empires). He combines extensive archival research with cutting-edge methodologies and arguments to redress the gaps between English- and Spanish-language criticism. Through innovative readings of foundational texts - Eliot's Criterion, Joyce's Ulysses, Woolf's Three Guineas - Rogers reveals modernism's symbiotic development with the works of Antonio Marichalar, Victoria Ocampo, Federico Garcia Lorca and others. In periodicals, fiction, poetry, translations, and correspondence, across the production and reception of texts, modernist writers created alliances that unified local and international reforms to reinvent Europe not in the London-Paris-Berlin nexus, but in Madrid.

Out of Ashes

A New History of Europe in the Twentieth Century

Author: Konrad H. Jarausch

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400883474

Category: History

Page: 888

View: 9756

A sweeping history of twentieth-century Europe, Out of Ashes tells the story of an era of unparalleled violence and barbarity yet also of humanity, prosperity, and promise. Konrad Jarausch describes how the European nations emerged from the nineteenth century with high hopes for continued material progress and proud of their imperial command over the globe, only to become embroiled in the bloodshed of World War I, which brought an end to their optimism and gave rise to competing democratic, communist, and fascist ideologies. He shows how the 1920s witnessed renewed hope and a flourishing of modernist art and literature, but how the decade ended in economic collapse and gave rise to a second, more devastating world war and genocide on an unprecedented scale. Jarausch further explores how Western Europe surprisingly recovered due to American help and political integration. Finally, he examines how the Cold War pushed the divided continent to the brink of nuclear annihilation, and how the unforeseen triumph of liberal capitalism came to be threatened by Islamic fundamentalism, global economic crisis, and an uncertain future. A gripping narrative, Out of Ashes explores the paradox of the European encounter with modernity in the twentieth century, shedding new light on why it led to cataclysm, inhumanity, and self-destruction, but also social justice, democracy, and peace.

European Modernity

A Global Approach

Author: Bo Stråth,Peter Wagner

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1350007080

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 6792

It is often taken for granted that modernity emerged in Europe and diffused from there across the world. This book questions that assumption and re-examines the question of European modernity in the light of world history. Bo Stråth and Peter Wagner re-position Europe in the global context of the 19th and 20th centuries. They show that Europe is less modern than has been assumed, and modernity less European and thus decentre Europe in a way that makes room for a wider historical perspective. Adopting a thematic structure, the authors reconceive the idea of European modernity in relation to key topics such as democracy, capitalism and market society, individual autonomy, religion and politics. European Modernity is an important addition to the literature that will be of interest to all students and scholars of modern European history.

149 Paintings You Really Need to See in Europe

(So You Can Ignore the Others)

Author: Julian Porter

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN: 1459700740

Category: Art

Page: 426

View: 2345

Visit some of Europe’s greatest museums and galleries in the company of a knowledgeable tour guide. "Who can resist an art critic with attitude?" – Former Supreme Court of Canada Justice, Ian Binnie "It was wonderful! Julian shared his enormous knowledge of the world’s best art with a panache that is irresistible." – Justice Stephen Goudge, Ontario Court of Appeal This essential companion to all the major European museums and galleries discusses some of the world’s greatest paintings from Giotto through to Picasso. Julian Porter’s passion for art began with the seven years he spent as a student tour guide in Europe. Since then, he has conducted countless tours of Europe’s famous galleries – The Louvre, The Prado, The Hermitage, The Rijksmuseum, the Sistine Chapel, and many others. In the usually pretentious arena of art connoisseurs, Porter’s voice stands out as fresh and original. He finds the best of the best, which he describes with entertaining irreverence, and spares you hours of sore feet and superfluous information.

The Hidden Europe

What Eastern Europeans Can Teach Us

Author: Francis Tapon

Publisher: SonicTrek, Inc.

ISBN: 0976581221

Category: Travel

Page: 736

View: 1755

Francis Tapon yearned for a European adventure, but Western Europe seemed too tame and passé. So he traveled for 3 years visiting every Eastern European country—all 25 of them.The Hidden Europe cleverly mixes insightful facts with hilarious personal anecdotes. It's profound, yet light. Francis Tapon is a sharp observer who helps you distinguish a Latvian from a Lithuanian, while not confusing Slovenia with Slovakia.You'll also learn: - Why Baltic people are human squirrels.- When and why Poland disappeared from Europe.- Why Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia broke up.- Why Hungarians are really Martians.- How Slovenians learn languages so quickly.- Why the Balkans is so screwed up.- Why there's much more to Romania than Dracula.- Which Moldovan tradition saves marriages.- What the future holds for Belarus, Ukraine, Russia.- Why communism was a dream . . . and a nightmare.You'll understand a side of Europe that is still mysterious and misunderstood even 20 years after the fall of the Soviet Union. Francis Tapon is an ideal guide in a book that will become a classic travel narrative.

Menace in Europe

Why the Continent's Crisis Is America's, Too

Author: Claire Berlinski

Publisher: Crown Forum

ISBN: 0307421287

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 3050

Old Europe’s new crisis. Europe, the charming continent of windmills and gondolas. But lately, Europe has become the continent of endless strikes and demonstrations, bombs on the trains and subways, radical Islamic cells in every city, and ghettos so hopeless and violent even the police won’t enter them. In Spain, a terrorist attack prompts instant capitulation to the terrorists’ demands. In France, the suburbs go up in flames every night. In Holland, politicians and artists are murdered for speaking frankly about Islamic immigration. This isn’t the Europe we thought we knew. What’s going on over there? Traveling overland from London to Istanbul, journalist Claire Berlinski shows why the Continent has lately appeared so bewildering—and often so thoroughly obnoxious—to Americans. Speaking to Muslim immigrants, German rock stars, French cops, and Italian women who have better things to do than have children, she finds that Europe is still, despite everything, in the grip of the same old ancient demons. Anyone who knows the history can sense it: There is something ugly—and familiar—in the air. But something new is happening as well. Indeed, Europe now confronts—and seems unable to cope with—an entirely new set of troubles. Tracing the ancient conflicts and newly erupting crises, Menace in Europe reveals: • Why Islamic radicalism and terrorist indoctrination flourish as Europe fails to assimilate millions of Muslim immigrants • How plummeting birthrates hurtle Europe toward economic and cultural catastrophe • Why hatred of America has become ubiquitous—on Europe’s streets, in its books, newspapers, and music, and at the highest levels of government • How long-repressed destructive instincts are suddenly reemerging • How the death of religious faith has created a hopeless, morally unmoored Europe that clings to anti-Americanism, anti-Semitism, and other dangerous ideologies • Why the notion of a united Europe is a fantasy and what that means for the United States In the end, these are not separate issues. Berlinski provocatively demonstrates that Europe’s political and cultural crisis mirrors its profound moral and spiritual crisis. But this is not just Europe’s problem. Menace in Europe makes clear that the spiritual void at the heart of Europe is ultimately our problem too. And America will pay a terrible price if we continue to ignore it. From the Hardcover edition.

The Shortest History of Europe

Author: John Hirst

Publisher: Black Inc.

ISBN: 192187063X

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 6052

Celebrated historian John Hirst offers a fascinating exploration of the qualities that made Europe a world-changing civilisation. The Shortest History of Europe begins with a rapid overview of European civilisation, describing its birth from an unlikely mixture of classical learning, Christianity and German warrior culture. Over the centuries, this unstable blend produced highly distinctive characters – pious knights and belligerent popes, romantics spouting folklore and revolutionaries imitating Rome – and its coming apart provided the dynamic of European history in modern times. Accompanied by lively illustrations, The Shortest History of Europe is a clear, humorous and thought-provoking account of a remarkable civilisation. This new edition brings the story into the present, covering the world wars and beyond.

The Arming of Europe and the Making of the First World War

Author: David G. Herrmann

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691015958

Category: History

Page: 307

View: 2422

Europe's adoption of new 20th-century weaponry increased its land-based military power and influenced international affairs during the series of diplomatic crises that led to the First World War. Historian David Herrmann draws on documentary research in military and state archives in Germany, France, Austria, England, and Italy to provide the most complete study of this subject to date. Illus.

Potsdam

The End of World War II and the Remaking of Europe

Author: Michael Neiberg

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465040624

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 1301

After Germany’s defeat in World War II, Europe lay in tatters. Millions of refugees were dispersed across the continent. Food and fuel were scarce. Britain was bankrupt, while Germany had been reduced to rubble. In July of 1945, Harry Truman, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin gathered in a quiet suburb of Berlin to negotiate a lasting peace: a peace that would finally put an end to the conflagration that had started in 1914, a peace under which Europe could be rebuilt. The award-winning historian Michael Neiberg brings the turbulent Potsdam conference to life, vividly capturing the delegates’ personalities: Truman, trying to escape from the shadow of Franklin Roosevelt, who had died only months before; Churchill, bombastic and seemingly out of touch; Stalin, cunning and meticulous. For the first week, negotiations progressed relatively smoothly. But when the delegates took a recess for the British elections, Churchill was replaced—both as prime minster and as Britain’s representative at the conference—in an unforeseen upset by Clement Attlee, a man Churchill disparagingly described as “a sheep in sheep’s clothing.” When the conference reconvened, the power dynamic had shifted dramatically, and the delegates struggled to find a new balance. Stalin took advantage of his strong position to demand control of Eastern Europe as recompense for the suffering experienced by the Soviet people and armies. The final resolutions of the Potsdam Conference, notably the division of Germany and the Soviet annexation of Poland, reflected the uneasy geopolitical equilibrium between East and West that would come to dominate the twentieth century. As Neiberg expertly shows, the delegates arrived at Potsdam determined to learn from the mistakes their predecessors made in the Treaty of Versailles. But, riven by tensions and dramatic debates over how to end the most recent war, they only dimly understood that their discussions of peace were giving birth to a new global conflict.

Europe in Its Own Eyes, Europe in the Eyes of the Other

Author: David B. MacDonald,Mary-Michelle DeCoste

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 1554588677

Category: Social Science

Page: 322

View: 8017

What is Europe? Who is European? What do Europe and European identity mean in the twenty-first century? This collection of sixteen essays seeks to answer these questions by focusing on Europe as it is seen through its own eyes and through the eyes of others across a variety of cultural texts, including sport, film, literature, dance, cartography, and fashion. These texts, as interpreted here by emerging researchers as well as well-established scholars, enable us to engage with European identities in the plural and to understand what these identities mean in larger cultural and political contexts. The interdisciplinary focus of this volume permits an exploration of European identity that reaches beyond the area of European studies to incorporate understandings of identity from the viewpoints of both insider and other. Contributors explore diverse understandings of what it means to be “other” to a country, a culture, a society, or a subgroup. This book offers a fresh perspective on the evolving concept of identity—in the context of Europe’s past, present, and future—and expands on the existing literature by considering the political tensions and social implications of the development of European identity, as well as its literary, artistic, and cultural manifestations.