Early Modern Emotions

An Introduction

Author: Susan Broomhall

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315441349

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 2793

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Early Modern Emotions is a student-friendly introduction to the concepts, approaches and sources used to study emotions in early modern Europe, and to the perspectives that analysis of the history of emotions can offer early modern studies more broadly. The volume is divided into four sections that guide students through the key processes and practices employed in current research on the history of emotions. The first explains how key terms and concepts in the study of emotions relate to early modern Europe, while the second focuses on the unique ways in which emotions were conceptualized at the time. The third section introduces a range of sources and methodologies that are used to analyse early modern emotions. The final section includes a wide-ranging selection of thematic topics covering war, religion, family, politics, art, music, literature and the non-human world to show how analysis of emotions may offer new perspectives on the early modern period more broadly. Each section offers bite-sized, accessible commentaries providing students new to the history of emotions with the tools to begin their own investigations. Each entry is supported by annotated further reading recommendations pointing students to the latest research in that area and at the end of the book is a general bibliography, which provides a comprehensive list of current scholarship. This book is the perfect starting point for any student wishing to study emotions in early modern Europe.

Violence and Emotions in Early Modern Europe

Author: Susan Broomhall,Sarah Finn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317424182

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 3680

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Violence and Emotions in Early Modern Europe examines the purposes for which specific forms of violence and particular emotional states functioned, how they operated in relation to each other, or indeed how one provoked, sustained or diminished the other. These twelve original essays demonstrate the complexities of violence and emotions and the myriad possibilities of their inter-relationships. They emphasize the great efforts that were made by early modern societies to control modes of violence and emotional regimes to achieve positive as well as negative effects, such as creating order, healing, and bringing individuals and communities together around productive identities. Authors consider legal documents, news reports, memoirs, letters, confraternity statutes, and medical consultations to investigate the bodily and textual practices in which violent and emotional acts were created, supported and disseminated to investigate the power, aims, effect and outcomes of relationships between violence and emotions. The chapters look at a range of topics and countries including Renaissance Italy and sixteenth-century Germany, France in the grip of the religious wars, and England’s Civil Wars as well as a wide range of topics including murder, punishment, community healing, insults, threats, prophecy and medical and devotional practices. This collection will be essential reading for students and scholars of the history of emotions or violence.

Reading the Early Modern Passions

Essays in the Cultural History of Emotion

Author: Gail Kern Paster,Katherine Rowe,Mary Floyd-Wilson

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812218728

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 384

View: 2826

DOWNLOAD NOW »

How translatable is the language of the emotions across cultures and time? What connotations of particular emotions, strongly felt in the early modern period, have faded or shifted completely in our own? If Western culture has traditionally held emotion to be hostile to reason and the production of scientific knowledge, why and how have the passions been lauded as windows to higher truths? Assessing the changing discourses of feeling and their relevance to the cultural history of affect, Reading the Early Modern Passions offers fourteen interdisciplinary essays on the meanings and representations of the emotional universe of Renaissance Europe in literature, music, and art. Many in the early modern era were preoccupied by the relation of passion to action and believed the passions to be a natural force requiring stringent mental and physical disciplines. In speaking to the question of the historicity and variability of emotions within individuals, several of these essays investigate specific emotions, such as sadness, courage, and fear. Other essays turn to emotions spread throughout society by contemporary events, such as a ruler's death, the outbreak of war, or religious schism, and discuss how such emotions have widespread consequences in both social practice and theory. Addressing anxieties about the power of emotions; their relation to the public good; their centrality in promoting or disturbing an individual's relation to God, to monarch, and to fellow human beings, the authors also look at the ways emotion serves as a marker or determinant of gender, ethnicity, and humanity. Contributors to the volume include Zirka Filipczak, Victoria Kahn, Michael Schoenfeldt, Bruce Smith, Richard Strier, and Gary Tomlinson.

Time, Narrative, and Emotion in Early Modern England

Author: David Houston Wood

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9780754666752

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 199

View: 341

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Exploiting a link between early modern concepts of the medical and the literary, David Wood examines the ways that depictions of time expressed in early modern medical texts reveal themselves in contemporary literary works, demonstrating that the early modern recognition of the self as a palpably volatile entity facilitated the realistic portrayal of literary characters and served as a structuring principle for narrative experimentation.

Gender and Emotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe: Destroying Order, Structuring Disorder

Author: Professor Susan Broomhall

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1472453271

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 3800

DOWNLOAD NOW »

States of emotion were vital as a foundation to society in the premodern period, employed as a force of order to structure diplomatic transactions, shape dynastic and familial relationships, and align religious beliefs, practices and communities. At the same time, societies understood that affective states had the potential to destroy order, creating undesirable disorder and instability that had both individual and communal consequences. This volume argues that the ways in which emotions created states of order and disorder in medieval and early modern Europe were deeply informed by contemporary gender ideologies. Together, the essays reveal the critical roles that gender ideologies and lived, structured, and desired emotional states played in producing both stability and instability.

Authority, Gender and Emotions in Late Medieval and Early Modern England

Author: Susan Broomhall

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137531169

Category: History

Page: 229

View: 9092

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This collection explores how situations of authority, governance, and influence were practised through both gender ideologies and affective performances in medieval and early modern England. Authority is inherently relational it must be asserted over someone who allows or is forced to accept this dominance. The capacity to exercise authority is therefore a social and cultural act, one that is shaped by social identities such as gender and by social practices that include emotions. The contributions in this volume, exploring case studies of women and men's letter-writing, political and ecclesiastical governance, household rule, exercise of law and order, and creative agency, investigate how gender and emotions shaped the ways different individuals could assert or maintain authority, or indeed disrupt or provide alternatives to conventional practices of authority.

Witchcraft, the Devil, and Emotions in Early Modern England

Author: Charlotte-Rose Millar

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1134769814

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 4666

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This book represents the first systematic study of the role of the Devil in English witchcraft pamphlets for the entire period of state-sanctioned witchcraft prosecutions (1563-1735). It provides a rereading of English witchcraft, one which moves away from an older historiography which underplays the role of the Devil in English witchcraft and instead highlights the crucial role that the Devil, often in the form of a familiar spirit, took in English witchcraft belief. One of the key ways in which this book explores the role of the Devil is through emotions. Stories of witches were made up of a complex web of emotionally implicated accusers, victims, witnesses, and supposed perpetrators. They reveal a range of emotional experiences that do not just stem from malefic witchcraft but also, and primarily, from a witch’s links with the Devil. This book, then, has two main objectives. First, to suggest that English witchcraft pamphlets challenge our understanding of English witchcraft as a predominantly non-diabolical crime, and second, to highlight how witchcraft narratives emphasized emotions as the primary motivation for witchcraft acts and accusations.

Affective and Emotional Economies in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Author: Andreea Marculescu,Charles-Louis Morand Métivier

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319606697

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 7887

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This book analyzes how acts of feeling at a discursive, somatic, and rhetorical level were theorized and practiced in multiple medieval and early-modern sources (literary, medical, theological, and archival). It covers a large chronological and geographical span from eleventh-century France, to fifteenth-century Iberia and England, and ending with seventeenth-century Jesuit meditative literature. Essays in this book explore how particular emotional norms belonging to different socio-cultural communities (courtly, academic, urban elites) were subverted or re-shaped; engage with the study of emotions as sudden, but impactful, bursts of sensory experience and feelings; and analyze how emotions are filtered and negotiated through the prism of literary texts and the socio-political status of their authors.

Understanding Emotions in Early Europe

Author: Michael Champion,Andrew Lynch

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9782503552644

Category: History

Page: 357

View: 1327

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This book investigates how medieval and early modern Europeans constructed, understood, and articulated emotions. The essays trace concurrent lines of influence that shaped post-Classical understandings of emotions through overlapping philosophical, rhetorical, and theological discourses. They show the effects of developments in genre and literary, aesthetic, and cognitive theories on depictions of psychological and embodied emotion in literature. They map the deeply embedded emotive content inherent in rituals, formal documents, daily conversation, communal practice, and cultural memory. The contributors focus on the mediation and interpretation of pre-modern emotional experience in cultural structures and institutions--customs, laws, courts, religious foundations--as well as in philosophical, literary, and aesthetic traditions. This volume thus represents a conspectus of contemporary interpretative strategies, displaying close connections between disciplinary and interdisciplinary critical practices drawn from historical studies, literature, anthropology and archaeology, philosophy and theology, cognitive science, psychology, religious studies, and gender studies. The essays stretch from classical and indigenous cultures to the contemporary West, embracing numerous national and linguistic groups. They illuminate the complex potential of medieval and early modern emotions in situ, analysing their involvement in subjects as diverse as philosophical theories, imaginative and scholarly writing, concepts of individual and communal identity, social and political practices, and the manifold business of everyday life.

The Spatiality of Emotion in Early Modern China

From Dreamscapes to Theatricality

Author: Ling Hon Lam

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231547587

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 9525

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Emotion takes place. Rather than an interior state of mind in response to the outside world, emotion per se is spatial, alternately embedding itself in us, transporting us, or dividing us from without. In this book, Ling Hon Lam gives a deeply original account of the history of emotions in Chinese literature and culture centered on the idea of emotion as space, which the Chinese call “emotion realm” (qingjing). Lam traces how the emotion realm underwent significant transformations from the dreamscape to theatricality in sixteenth- to eighteenth-century China. Whereas medieval dreamscapes delivered the subject into one illusory mood after another, early modern theatricality turned the dreamer into a spectator who is no longer falling through endless oneiric layers but pausing in front of the dream.Through the lens of this genealogy of emotion realms, Lam remaps the Chinese histories of morals, theater, and knowledge production, which converge at the emergence of sympathy, redefined as the dissonance among the dimensions of the emotion realm pertaining to theatricality.The book challenges the conventional reading of Chinese literature as premised on interior subjectivity, examines historical changes in the spatial logic of performance through media and theater archaeologies, and ultimately uncovers the different trajectories that brought China and the West to the convergence point of theatricality marked by self-deception and mutual misreading. A major rethinking of key terms in Chinese culture from a comparative perspective, The Spatiality of Emotion in Early Modern China develops a new critical vocabulary to conceptualize history and existence.

Masculinity and Emotion in Early Modern English Literature

Author: Jennifer C. Vaught

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9780754662945

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 244

View: 1396

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Offering new readings of works by Shakespeare, Spenser, and their contemporaries, this study examines the profound impact of the cultural shift in the English aristocracy from feudal warriors to emotionally expressive courtiers or gentlemen on all kinds of men in early modern English literature. Jennifer Vaught traces the gradual emergence of men of feeling during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, to the blossoming of this literary version of manhood during the eighteenth century.

The Reformation of Feeling

Shaping the Religious Emotions in Early Modern Germany

Author: Susan C. Karant-Nunn

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199741991

Category: Religion

Page: 352

View: 9536

DOWNLOAD NOW »

In The Reformation of Feeling, Susan Karant-Nunn looks beyond and beneath the formal doctrinal and moral demands of the Reformation in Germany to examine the emotional tenor of the programs that the emerging creeds--revised Catholicism, Lutheranism, and Calvinism/Reformed theology--developed for their members. As revealed by the surviving sermons from this period, preaching clergy of each faith both explicitly and implicitly provided their listeners with distinct models of a mood to be cultivated. To encourage their parishioners to make an emotional investment in their faith, all three groups drew upon rhetorical elements that were already present in late medieval Catholicism and elevated them into confessional touchstones. This book is exceptional in its presentation of a cultural rather than theological or behavioral study of the broader movement to remake Christianity. As Karant-Nunn conclusively demonstrates, in the eyes of the Reformation's formative personalities strict adherence to doctrine and upright demeanor did not constitute an adequate piety. The truly devout had to engage their hearts in their faith.

Ordering Emotions in Europe, 1100–1800

Author: Susan Broomhall

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004305106

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 4317

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Ordering Emotions in Europe, 1100-1800 investigates how emotions were conceptualised and practised in the medieval and early modern period, as they ordered systems of thought and practice—from philosophy and theology, to science and medicine.

The Secret History of Emotion

From Aristotle's Rhetoric to Modern Brain Science

Author: Daniel M. Gross

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 1459606221

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 350

View: 5663

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Princess Diana's death was a tragedy that provoked mourning across the globe; the death of a homeless person, more often than not, is met with apathy. How can we account for this uneven distribution of emotion? Can it simply be explained by the prevailing scientific understanding? Uncovering a rich tradition beginning with Aristotle, The Secret History of Emotion offers a counterpoint to the way we generally understand emotions today. Through a radical rereading of Aristotle, Seneca, Thomas Hobbes, Sarah Fielding, and Judith Butler, among others, Daniel M. Gross reveals a persistent intellectual current that considers emotions as psychosocial phenomena. In Gross's historical analysis of emotion, Aristotle and Hobbes's rhetoric show that our passions do not stem from some inherent, universal nature of men and women, but rather are conditioned by power relations and social hierarchies. He follows up with consideration of how political passions are distributed to some people but not to others using the Roman Stoics as a guide. Hume and contemporary theorists like Judith Butler, meanwhile, explain to us how psyches are shaped by power. To supplement his argument, Gross also provides a history and critique of the dominant modern view of emotions, expressed in Darwinism and neurobiology, in which they are considered organic, personal feelings independent of social circumstances. The result is a convincing work that rescues the study of the passions from science and returns it to the humanities and the art of rhetoric.

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England

Author: S. P. Cerasano

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN: 9780838641279

Category: Drama

Page: 305

View: 4499

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Each volume contains essays and studies by critics and cultural historians from both hemispheres as well as substantial reviews of books and essays dealing with medieval and early modern English Drama. The journal was founded in 1984, and since then well over four hundred articles, review essays, and book reviews have appeared on its pages.

Childhood, Youth and Emotions in Modern History

National, Colonial and Global Perspectives

Author: Stephanie Olsen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137484845

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 7700

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Childhood, Youth and Emotions in Modern History is the first book to innovatively combine the history of childhood and youth with the history of emotions, combining multiple national, colonial, and global perspectives.

Disaster, Death and the Emotions in the Shadow of the Apocalypse, 1400–1700

Author: Jennifer Spinks,Charles Zika

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137442719

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 2871

DOWNLOAD NOW »

In late medieval and early modern Europe, textual and visual records of disaster and mass death allow us to encounter the intense emotions generated through the religious, providential and apocalyptic frameworks that provided these events with meaning. This collection brings together historians, art historians, and literary specialists in a cross-disciplinary collection shaped by new developments in the history of emotions. It offers a rich range of analytical frameworks and case studies, from the emotional language of divine providence to individual and communal experiences of disaster. Geographically wide-ranging, the collection also analyses many different sorts of media: from letters and diaries to broadsheets and paintings. Through these and other historical records, the contributors examine how communities and individuals experienced, responded to, recorded and managed the emotional dynamics and trauma created by dramatic events like massacres, floods, fires, earthquakes and plagues.

Affective and Emotional Economies in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Author: Andreea Marculescu,Charles-Louis Morand Métivier

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319606697

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 5745

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This book analyzes how acts of feeling at a discursive, somatic, and rhetorical level were theorized and practiced in multiple medieval and early-modern sources (literary, medical, theological, and archival). It covers a large chronological and geographical span from eleventh-century France, to fifteenth-century Iberia and England, and ending with seventeenth-century Jesuit meditative literature. Essays in this book explore how particular emotional norms belonging to different socio-cultural communities (courtly, academic, urban elites) were subverted or re-shaped; engage with the study of emotions as sudden, but impactful, bursts of sensory experience and feelings; and analyze how emotions are filtered and negotiated through the prism of literary texts and the socio-political status of their authors.

The Renaissance of Emotion

Author: Richard Meek,Erin Sullivan,Senior Lecturer and Fellow Erin Sullivan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 152611691X

Category:

Page: 272

View: 1213

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This collection of essays offers a major reassessment of the meaning and significance of emotional experience in the work of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Recent scholarship on early modern emotion has relied on a medical-historical approach, resulting in a picture of emotional experience that stresses the dominance of the material, humoral body. While such scholarship has been important in foregrounding questions related to historical phenomenology and embodiment, it has obscured the extent to which other intellectual and creative frameworks - including religion, philosophy, rhetoric and drama - also shaped cultural beliefs about emotion in the period. The Renaissance of Emotion seeks to redress this balance by examining the ways in which Shakespeare and his contemporaries explored emotional experience from perspectives other than humoral medicine. Bringing together an international group of established and emerging scholars, the volume demonstrates how open, creative and agency-ridden the experience and interpretation of early modern emotion could be. Taken individually, the chapters offer much-needed investigations into previously overlooked areas of emotional experience and signification; taken together, they offer a thorough re-evaluation of the cultural priorities and phenomenological principles that shaped the understanding of the emotive self in the early modern period. The Renaissance of Emotion will be of particular interest to students and scholars of Shakespeare and Renaissance literature, the history of emotion, theatre and cultural history, and the history of ideas.