Department of Defense Appropriations for 2000

Hearings Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session

Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Appropriations. Subcommittee on Dept. of Defense

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 7378

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Department of Defense Appropriations for 2000

Hearings Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session

Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Appropriations. Subcommittee on Department of Defense

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: 4

View: 7040

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Department of Defense Authorization for Appropriations for Fiscal Year 2000 and the Future Years Defense Program: Airland forces

Author: United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Armed Services

Publisher: Government Printing Office

ISBN: 9780160395079

Category: Political Science

Page: 7

View: 5770

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Hearings Before the Committee on Armed Services, United States Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, on S. 2057, Authorizing Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1999 for Military Activities of the Department of Defense, for Military Construction & for Defense Activities of the Department of Energy, to Prescribe Personnel Strengths for Such Fiscal Year for the Armed Forces & for Other Purposes.

The Pig Book

How Government Wastes Your Money

Author: Citizens Against Government Waste

Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin

ISBN: 146685314X

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 8097

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The federal government wastes your tax dollars worse than a drunken sailor on shore leave. The 1984 Grace Commission uncovered that the Department of Defense spent $640 for a toilet seat and $436 for a hammer. Twenty years later things weren't much better. In 2004, Congress spent a record-breaking $22.9 billion dollars of your money on 10,656 of their pork-barrel projects. The war on terror has a lot to do with the record $413 billion in deficit spending, but it's also the result of pork over the last 18 years the likes of: - $50 million for an indoor rain forest in Iowa - $102 million to study screwworms which were long ago eradicated from American soil - $273,000 to combat goth culture in Missouri - $2.2 million to renovate the North Pole (Lucky for Santa!) - $50,000 for a tattoo removal program in California - $1 million for ornamental fish research Funny in some instances and jaw-droppingly stupid and wasteful in others, The Pig Book proves one thing about Capitol Hill: pork is king!

Department of Defense Fuel Spending, Supply, Acquisition, and Policy

Author: Anthony Andrews

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN: 1437925081

Category: Defense contracts

Page: 23

View: 5917

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DoD fuel consumption varies from year to year in response to changes in mission and the tempo of operations. DoD may consume upwards of 1% of the petroleum products refined in the U.S. annually. The majority of DoD¿s bulk fuel purchases are for jet fuel, which has ranged as high as 101 million barrels annually in the past decade. The U.S. refining industry has been supplying 50% of DoD¿s jet fuel. Contents of this report: (1) Background; (2) Fuel Purchases: DoD Fuel Cost vs. Commercial Fuel Price; (3) Refining, Suppliers, and the Crude Oil Supply: Crude Oil Supply; Refining; Sulfur Reg¿s.; Greenhouse Gas Reg¿n.; U.S. Refiners Supplying DoD Fuel; Refinery Jet Fuel Yield and Supply; (4) Fuel Acquisition: Acquisition Reg¿s.; Alternative Fuels. Illustrations.

Congressional Record (Bound Volumes): Volume 153

Author: Congress

Publisher: Congress

ISBN: 9780160912443

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 3309

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The Congressional Record contains the proceedings and debates of each Congressional session in the House of Representatives and the Senate. Arranged in calendar order, each volume includes the exact text of everything that was said and includes members' remarks.

Review of the Future of the U.S. Aerospace Infrastructure and Aerospace Engineering Disciplines to Meet the Needs of the Air Force and the Department of Defense

Author: National Research Council,Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences,Air Force Science and Technology Board,Committee on the Future of the U.S. Aerospace Infrastructure and Aerospace Engineering Disciplines to Meet the Needs of the Air Force and the Department of Defense

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 0309170419

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 66

View: 6918

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The Principal Deputy to the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition requested that the National Research Council (NRC) review the Air Force's planned acquisition programs to determine if, given its scale, the highly talented scientific, technical, and engineering personnel base could be maintained, to identify issues affecting the engineering and science work force, and to identify issues affecting the aerospace industry's leadership in technology development, innovation, and product quality, as well as its ability to support Air Force missions.

Protecting Our Forces:

Improving Vaccine Acquisition and Availability in the U.S. Military

Author: Committee on a Strategy for Minimizing the Impact of Naturally Occurring Infectious Diseases of Military Importance: Vaccine Issues in the U.S. Military,Institute of Medicine,Medical Follow-Up Agency

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 0309084997

Category: Medical

Page: 158

View: 8505

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Infectious diseases continue to pose a substantial threat to the operational capacity of military forces. Protecting Our Forces reviews the process by which the U.S. military acquires vaccines to protect its warfighters from natural infectious disease threats. The committee found that poorly aligned acquisition processes and an inadequate commitment of financial resources within the Department of Defense vaccine acquisition process – rather than uncleared scientific or technological hurdles – contribute to the unavailability of some vaccines that could protect military personnel and, implicitly, the welfare and security of the nation. Protecting Our Forces outlines ways in which DoD might strengthen its acquisition process and improve vaccine availability. Recommendations, which include combining all DoD vaccine acquisition responsibilities under a single DoD authority, cover four broad aspects of the acquisition process: (1) organization, authority, and responsibility; (2) program and budget; (3)manufacturing; (4) and the regulatory status of special-use vaccines.