Capitol Men

The Epic Story of Reconstruction Through the Lives of the First Black Congressmen

Author: Philip Dray

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 0547526911

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 1377

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A New York Times Notable Book: A “stirring” and “eye-opening” history of the Reconstruction era’s forgotten heroes from the award-winning author (The New York Times Book Review). The years following the Civil War were some of the most progressive and precarious in United States history. Under the terms of congressional Reconstruction, newly emancipated African American men began to vote—and win elections. But the more power they gained, the more bitter and violent a backlash they faced. In this compelling history, Pulitzer Prize finalist Philip Dray shines a light on the first black members of Congress. We meet men like Hiram Revels of Mississippi, who in 1870 took the congressional seat once held by Jefferson Davis; Robert Smalls of South Carolina, the Civil War hero who had stolen a Confederate vessel and delivered it to the Union navy; and Robert Brown Elliott, who bested the former Confederate vice president in a stormy debate on the House floor. Often neglected by standard histories of the period, these individuals—some of whom were formerly enslaved—played a critical role in the fight for public education, equal rights, land distribution, and more. Drawing on archival documents, contemporary newspaper coverage, and congressional records, Dray covers the fraught period between the Emancipation Proclamation and Jim Crow, following these trailblazing politicians in their effort to realize the promise of a new nation. “Dray casts fresh light on the positive aspects of Reconstruction and powerfully dramatizes its negative side. His well-researched book is both exhilarating and disturbing.” —The New York Times Book Review “Capitol Men is an excellent choice for both newcomers to the Reconstruction saga and those already informed about the period.” —Atlanta Journal-Constitution “Dray is an engaging writer with an eye for the dramatic incident and an ability to draw out its broader significance and relevance to our own times.” —The Nation

There is Power in a Union

The Epic Story of Labor in America

Author: Philip Dray

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0307389766

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 772

View: 9764

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The Pulitzer Prize finalist author of At the Hands of Persons Unknown presents a narrative chronicle of American organized labor from the origins of the industrial age to the present, documenting the rise and fall of unions and the ongoing fight for workplace equality.

The Senator and the Socialite

The True Story of America's First Black Dynasty

Author: N.A

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0060184124

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 455

View: 1415

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Follows the lives and fortunes of the Bruce family, from Blanche Kelso Bruce, who was born a slave in 1841, and became the first black person to serve a full term in the Senate, to the scandal that sent his grandson to prison.

The Fair Chase

The Epic Story of Hunting in America

Author: Philip Dray

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 1541616731

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 7140

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An award-winning historian tells the story of hunting in America, showing how this sport has shaped our national identity. From Daniel Boone to Teddy Roosevelt, hunting is one of America's most sacred-but also most fraught-traditions. It was promoted in the 19th century as a way to reconnect "soft" urban Americans with nature and to the legacy of the country's pathfinding heroes. Fair chase, a hunting code of ethics emphasizing fairness, rugged independence, and restraint towards wildlife, emerged as a worldview and gave birth to the conservation movement. But the sport's popularity also caused class, ethnic, and racial divisions, and stirred debate about the treatment of Native Americans and the role of hunting in preparing young men for war. This sweeping and balanced book offers a definitive account of hunting in America. It is essential reading for anyone interested in the evolution of our nation's foundational myths.

The Wars of Reconstruction

The Brief, Violent History of America's Most Progressive Era

Author: Douglas R. Egerton

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 160819566X

Category: History

Page: 438

View: 9786

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A groundbreaking new history, telling the stories of hundreds of African-American activists and officeholders who risked their lives for equality--in the face of murderous violence--in the years after the Civil War.

Making America: A History of the United States, Volume 2: Since 1865, Brief

Author: Carol Berkin,Christopher Miller,Robert Cherny,James Gormly,Douglas Egerton

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1133943284

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 4414

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MAKING AMERICA: A HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, BRIEF SIXTH EDITION, presents history as a dynamic process shaped by human expectations, difficult choices, and often the surprising consequences. With this focus on history as a process, MAKING AMERICA encourages readers to think historically and to develop into citizens who value the past. The clear chronology, straightforward narrative, and strong thematic structure emphasize communication over intimidation and appeal to readers of varied learning levels. The Brief Sixth Edition retains a hallmark feature of the MAKING AMERICA program: pedagogical tools that allow readers to master complex material and enable them to develop analytical skills. Every chapter has chapter outlines, chronologies, focus questions, and on-page glossaries (defining both key terms and general vocabulary) to provide guidance throughout the text; the open, inviting design allows readers to access and use pedagogy to improve learning. A wealth of images throughout provides a visual connection to the past, with captions that help readers analyze the subject of the painting, photograph, or artifact from an historical point of view. Investigating America gets to the heart of learning history: reading and analyzing primary sources. A new feature, In The Wider World introduces a global perspective for each chapter. In addition, a new map program provides clear, visually engaging maps with globe insets to put the map in a global context. Available in the following split options: MAKING AMERICA, Brief Sixth Edition Complete, Volume 1: To 1877, and Volume 2: Since 1865. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

The Ordeal of the Reunion

A New History of Reconstruction

Author: Mark Wahlgren Summers

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469617587

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 5837

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For a generation, scholarship on the Reconstruction era has rightly focused on the struggles of the recently emancipated for a meaningful freedom and defined its success or failure largely in those terms. In The Ordeal of the Reunion, Mark Wahlgren Summers goes beyond this vitally important question, focusing on Reconstruction's need to form an enduring Union without sacrificing the framework of federalism and republican democracy. Assessing the era nationally, Summers emphasizes the variety of conservative strains that confined the scope of change, highlights the war's impact and its aftermath, and brings the West and foreign policy into an integrated narrative. In sum, this book offers a fresh explanation for Reconstruction's demise and a case for its essential successes as well as its great failures. Indeed, this book demonstrates the extent to which the victors' aims in 1865 were met--and at what cost. Summers depicts not just a heroic, tragic moment with equal rights advanced and then betrayed but a time of achievement and consolidation, in which nationhood and emancipation were placed beyond repeal and the groundwork was laid for a stronger, if not better, America to come.

At the Hands of Persons Unknown

The Lynching of Black America

Author: Philip Dray

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN: 0307430669

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 4002

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It is easy to shrink from our country’s brutal history of lynching. Lynching is called the last great skeleton in our nation’s closet: It terrorized all of black America, claimed thousands upon thousands of victims in the decades between the 1880s and the Second World War, and leaves invisible but deep scars to this day. The cost of pushing lynching into the shadows, however—misremembering it as isolated acts perpetrated by bigots on society’s fringes—is insupportably high: Until we understand how pervasive and socially accepted the practice was—and, more important, why this was so—it will haunt all efforts at racial reconciliation. “I could not suppress the thought,” James Baldwin once recalled of seeing the red clay hills of Georgia on his first trip to the South, “that this earth had acquired its color from the blood that had dripped down from these trees.” Throughout America, not just in the South, blacks accused of a crime—or merely of violating social or racial customs—were hunted by mobs, abducted from jails, and given summary “justice” in blatant defiance of all guarantees of due process under law. Men and women were shot, hanged, tortured, and burned, often in sadistic, picnic-like “spectacle lynchings” involving thousands of witnesses. “At the hands of persons unknown” was the official verdict rendered on most of these atrocities. The celebrated historian Philip Dray shines a clear, bright light on this dark history—its causes, perpetrators, apologists, and victims. He also tells the story of the men and women who led the long and difficult fight to expose and eradicate lynching, including Ida B. Wells, James Weldon Johnson, Walter White, and W.E.B. Du Bois. If lynching is emblematic of what is worst about America, their fight may stand for what is best: the love of justice and fairness and the conviction that one individual’s sense of right can suffice to defy the gravest of wrongs. This landmark book follows the trajectory of both forces over American history—and makes the history of lynching belong to us all. From the Hardcover edition.

Forever Free

The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction

Author: Eric Foner

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307834581

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 8667

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From one of our most distinguished historians, a new examination of the vitally important years of Emancipation and Reconstruction during and immediately following the Civil War–a necessary reconsideration that emphasizes the era’s political and cultural meaning for today’s America. In Forever Free, Eric Foner overturns numerous assumptions growing out of the traditional understanding of the period, which is based almost exclusively on white sources and shaped by (often unconscious) racism. He presents the period as a time of determination, especially on the part of recently emancipated black Americans, to put into effect the principles of equal rights and citizenship for all. Drawing on a wide range of long-neglected documents, he places a new emphasis on the centrality of the black experience to an understanding of the era. We see African Americans as active agents in overthrowing slavery, in helping win the Civil War, and–even more actively–in shaping Reconstruction and creating a legacy long obscured and misunderstood. Foner makes clear how, by war’s end, freed slaves in the South built on networks of church and family in order to exercise their right of suffrage as well as gain access to education, land, and employment. He shows us that the birth of the Ku Klux Klan and renewed acts of racial violence were retaliation for the progress made by blacks soon after the war. He refutes lingering misconceptions about Reconstruction, including the attribution of its ills to corrupt African American politicians and “carpetbaggers,” and connects it to the movements for civil rights and racial justice. Joshua Brown’s illustrated commentary on the era’s graphic art and photographs complements the narrative. He offers a unique portrait of how Americans envisioned their world and time. Forever Free is an essential contribution to our understanding of the events that fundamentally reshaped American life after the Civil War–a persuasive reading of history that transforms our sense of the era from a time of failure and despair to a threshold of hope and achievement.

Crossing the Continent 1527-1540

The Story of the First African-American Explorer of the American South

Author: Dr. Robert Goodwin

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0061981656

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 6325

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The true story of America's first great explorer and adventurer—an African slave named Esteban Dorantes Crossing the Continent takes us on an epic journey from Africa to Europe and America as Dr. Robert Goodwin chronicles the incredible adventures of the African slave Esteban Dorantes (1500-1539), the first pioneer from the Old World to explore the entirety of the American south and the first African-born man to die in North America about whom anything is known. Goodwin's groundbreaking research in Spanish archives has led to a radical new interpretation of American history—one in which an African slave emerges as the nation's first great explorer and adventurer. Nearly three centuries before Lewis and Clark's epic trek to the Pacific coast, Esteban and three Spanish noblemen survived shipwreck, famine, disease, and Native American hostility to make the first crossing of North America in recorded history. Drawing on contemporary accounts and long-lost records, Goodwin recounts the extraordinary story of Esteban's sixteenth-century odyssey, which began in Florida and wound through what is now Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, as far as the Gulf of California. Born in Africa and captured at a young age by slave traders, Esteban was serving his owner, a Spanish captain, when their disastrous sea voyage to the New World nearly claimed his life. Eventually he emerged as the leader of the few survivors of this expedition, guiding them on an extraordinary eight-year march westward to safety. On the group's return to the Spanish imperial capital at Mexico City, the viceroy appointed Esteban as the military commander of a religious expedition sent to establish a permanent Spanish route into Arizona and New Mexico. But during this new adventure, as Esteban pushed deeper and deeper into the unknown north, Spaniards far to the south began to hear strange rumors of his death at Zuni Pueblo in New Mexico. Filled with tales of physical endurance, natural calamities, geographical wonders, strange discoveries, and Esteban's almost mystical dealings with Native Americans, Crossing the Continent challenges the traditional telling of our nation's early history, placing an African and his relationship with the Indians he encountered at the heart of a new historical record.

Silencing the Opposition

How the U.S. Government Suppressed Freedom of Expression During Major Crises, Second Edition

Author: Craig R. Smith

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438435215

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 1648

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Examines major challenges to the Fist Amendment and focuses on the extremely important paradigm shift of freedom of expression in the post-9/11 era.

Bending Toward Justice

The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy

Author: Gary May

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465050735

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 5554

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When the Fifteenth Amendment of 1870 granted African Americans the right to vote, it seemed as if a new era of political equality was at hand. Before long, however, white segregationists across the South counterattacked, driving their black countrymen from the polls through a combination of sheer terror and insidious devices such as complex literacy tests and expensive poll taxes. Most African Americans would remain voiceless for nearly a century more, citizens in name only until the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act secured their access to the ballot. In Bending Toward Justice, celebrated historian Gary May describes how black voters overcame centuries of bigotry to secure and preserve one of their most important rights as American citizens. The struggle that culminated in the passage of the Voting Rights Act was long and torturous, and only succeeded because of the courageous work of local freedom fighters and national civil rights leaders—as well as, ironically, the opposition of Southern segregationists and law enforcement officials, who won public sympathy for the voting rights movement by brutally attacking peaceful demonstrators. But while the Voting Rights Act represented an unqualified victory over such forces of hate, May explains that its achievements remain in jeopardy. Many argue that the 2008 election of President Barack Obama rendered the act obsolete, yet recent years have seen renewed efforts to curb voting rights and deny minorities the act’s hard-won protections. Legal challenges to key sections of the act may soon lead the Supreme Court to declare those protections unconstitutional. A vivid, fast-paced history of this landmark piece of civil rights legislation, Bending Toward Justice offers a dramatic, timely account of the struggle that finally won African Americans the ballot—although, as May shows, the fight for voting rights is by no means over.

Frederick Douglass

Prophet of Freedom

Author: David W. Blight

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416593888

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 912

View: 1597

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The definitive, dramatic biography of the most important African-American of the nineteenth century: Frederick Douglass, the escaped slave who became the greatest orator of his day and one of the leading abolitionists and writers of the era. As a young man Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) escaped from slavery in Baltimore, Maryland. He was fortunate to have been taught to read by his slave owner mistress, and he would go on to become one of the major literary figures of his time. He wrote three versions of his autobiography over the course of his lifetime and published his own newspaper. His very existence gave the lie to slave owners: with dignity and great intelligence he bore witness to the brutality of slavery. Initially mentored by William Lloyd Garrison, Douglass spoke widely, often to large crowds, using his own story to condemn slavery. He broke with Garrison to become a political abolitionist, a Republican, and eventually a Lincoln supporter. By the Civil War and during Reconstruction, Douglass became the most famed and widely travelled orator in the nation. He denounced the premature end of Reconstruction and the emerging Jim Crow era. In his unique and eloquent voice, written and spoken, Douglass was a fierce critic of the United States as well as a radical patriot. He sometimes argued politically with younger African-Americans, but he never forsook either the Republican party or the cause of black civil and political rights. In this remarkable biography, David Blight has drawn on new information held in a private collection that few other historian have consulted, as well as recently discovered issues of Douglass’s newspapers. Blight tells the fascinating story of Douglass’s two marriages and his complex extended family. Douglass was not only an astonishing man of words, but a thinker steeped in Biblical story and theology. There has not been a major biography of Douglass in a quarter century. David Blight’s Frederick Douglass affords this important American the distinguished biography he deserves.

Stealing God's Thunder

Benjamin Franklin's Lightning Rod And the Invention of America

Author: Philip Dray

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN: 0812968107

Category: History

Page: 279

View: 1620

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A detailed portrait of Benjamin Franklin concentrates on his scientific experiments and discoveries and explores the implications of his empirical research and his revolutionary inventions for the evolution of American democracy.

Splendid failure

postwar Reconstruction in the American South

Author: Michael W. Fitzgerald

Publisher: Ivan R Dee

ISBN: 9781566637343

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 234

View: 5457

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An alternate interpretation of the role of post-Civil War radical Republican reconstruction policies demonstrates how the internal dynamics of early civil rights were influenced by southern prejudice, covering such topics as financial challenges, voting rights, and the period's modern-day ramifications.

Apostles of Disunion

Southern Secession Commissioners and the Causes of the Civil War

Author: Charles B. Dew

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813939453

Category: History

Page: 168

View: 6088

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Charles Dew’s Apostles of Disunion has established itself as a modern classic and an indispensable account of the Southern states’ secession from the Union. Addressing topics still hotly debated among historians and the public at large more than a century and a half after the Civil War, the book offers a compelling and clearly substantiated argument that slavery and race were at the heart of our great national crisis. The fifteen years since the original publication of Apostles of Disunion have seen an intensification of debates surrounding the Confederate flag and Civil War monuments. In a powerful new afterword to this anniversary edition, Dew situates the book in relation to these recent controversies and factors in the role of vast financial interests tied to the internal slave trade in pushing Virginia and other upper South states toward secession and war.

On the Front Lines of the Cold War

An American Correspondent's Journal from the Chinese Civil War to the Cuban Missile Crisis and Vietnam

Author: Seymour Topping

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 9780807137307

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 8362

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The well-known New York Times correspondent narrates his experiences reporting on some of major events and conflicts of the years following World War II and discusses his interviews with such political figures as Mao Tse Tung and Fidel Castro.

Help Me to Find My People

The African American Search for Family Lost in Slavery

Author: Heather Andrea Williams

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807882658

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 5956

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After the Civil War, African Americans placed poignant "information wanted" advertisements in newspapers, searching for missing family members. Inspired by the power of these ads, Heather Andrea Williams uses slave narratives, letters, interviews, public records, and diaries to guide readers back to devastating moments of family separation during slavery when people were sold away from parents, siblings, spouses, and children. Williams explores the heartbreaking stories of separation and the long, usually unsuccessful journeys toward reunification. Examining the interior lives of the enslaved and freedpeople as they tried to come to terms with great loss, Williams grounds their grief, fear, anger, longing, frustration, and hope in the history of American slavery and the domestic slave trade. Williams follows those who were separated, chronicles their searches, and documents the rare experience of reunion. She also explores the sympathy, indifference, hostility, or empathy expressed by whites about sundered black families. Williams shows how searches for family members in the post-Civil War era continue to reverberate in African American culture in the ongoing search for family history and connection across generations.

The Slaves' War

The Civil War in the Words of Former Slaves

Author: Andrew Ward

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780547237923

Category: History

Page: 386

View: 5708

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Interweaving hundreds of interviews with excerpts from diaries, letters, and memoirs, a narrative history of the American Civil War captures the story of the conflict from the perspective of the African-American slaves who played a role, documenting the carnage of the battlefield, assessment of the military leaders of both sides, attitudes toward masters and liberators alike, and more.

A Short History of Reconstruction

Author: Eric Foner

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062384074

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 1451

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From the "preeminent historian of Reconstruction" (New York Times Book Review), a newly updated AND abridged edition of the prizewinning classic on the post–Civil War period that shaped modern America In this updated edition of the abridged Reconstruction, Eric Foner redefines how the post-Civil War period was viewed. Reconstruction chronicles the way in which Americans—black and white—responded to the unprecedented changes unleashed by the war and the end of slavery. It addresses the quest of emancipated slaves searching for economic autonomy and equal citizenship, and describes the remodeling of Southern society, the evolution of racial attitudes and patterns of race relations, and the emergence of a national state possessing vastly expanded authority and committed, for a time, to the principle of equal rights for all Americans. This "masterful treatment of one of the most complex periods of American history" (New Republic) remains the standard work on the wrenching post-Civil War period—an era whose legacy still reverberates in the United States today.