Capitol Men

The Epic Story of Reconstruction Through the Lives of the First Black Congressmen

Author: Philip Dray

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 0547526911

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 9408

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A New York Times Notable Book: A “stirring” and “eye-opening” history of the Reconstruction era’s forgotten heroes from the award-winning author (The New York Times Book Review). The years following the Civil War were some of the most progressive and precarious in United States history. Under the terms of congressional Reconstruction, newly emancipated African American men began to vote—and win elections. But the more power they gained, the more bitter and violent a backlash they faced. In this compelling history, Pulitzer Prize finalist Philip Dray shines a light on the first black members of Congress. We meet men like Hiram Revels of Mississippi, who in 1870 took the congressional seat once held by Jefferson Davis; Robert Smalls of South Carolina, the Civil War hero who had stolen a Confederate vessel and delivered it to the Union navy; and Robert Brown Elliott, who bested the former Confederate vice president in a stormy debate on the House floor. Often neglected by standard histories of the period, these individuals—some of whom were formerly enslaved—played a critical role in the fight for public education, equal rights, land distribution, and more. Drawing on archival documents, contemporary newspaper coverage, and congressional records, Dray covers the fraught period between the Emancipation Proclamation and Jim Crow, following these trailblazing politicians in their effort to realize the promise of a new nation. “Dray casts fresh light on the positive aspects of Reconstruction and powerfully dramatizes its negative side. His well-researched book is both exhilarating and disturbing.” —The New York Times Book Review “Capitol Men is an excellent choice for both newcomers to the Reconstruction saga and those already informed about the period.” —Atlanta Journal-Constitution “Dray is an engaging writer with an eye for the dramatic incident and an ability to draw out its broader significance and relevance to our own times.” —The Nation

There is Power in a Union

The Epic Story of Labor in America

Author: Philip Dray

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0307389766

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 772

View: 1733

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The Pulitzer Prize finalist author of At the Hands of Persons Unknown presents a narrative chronicle of American organized labor from the origins of the industrial age to the present, documenting the rise and fall of unions and the ongoing fight for workplace equality.

Making America: A History of the United States, Volume 2: Since 1865, Brief

Author: Carol Berkin,Christopher Miller,Robert Cherny,James Gormly,Douglas Egerton

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1133943284

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 8495

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MAKING AMERICA: A HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, BRIEF SIXTH EDITION, presents history as a dynamic process shaped by human expectations, difficult choices, and often the surprising consequences. With this focus on history as a process, MAKING AMERICA encourages readers to think historically and to develop into citizens who value the past. The clear chronology, straightforward narrative, and strong thematic structure emphasize communication over intimidation and appeal to readers of varied learning levels. The Brief Sixth Edition retains a hallmark feature of the MAKING AMERICA program: pedagogical tools that allow readers to master complex material and enable them to develop analytical skills. Every chapter has chapter outlines, chronologies, focus questions, and on-page glossaries (defining both key terms and general vocabulary) to provide guidance throughout the text; the open, inviting design allows readers to access and use pedagogy to improve learning. A wealth of images throughout provides a visual connection to the past, with captions that help readers analyze the subject of the painting, photograph, or artifact from an historical point of view. Investigating America gets to the heart of learning history: reading and analyzing primary sources. A new feature, In The Wider World introduces a global perspective for each chapter. In addition, a new map program provides clear, visually engaging maps with globe insets to put the map in a global context. Available in the following split options: MAKING AMERICA, Brief Sixth Edition Complete, Volume 1: To 1877, and Volume 2: Since 1865. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Silencing the Opposition

How the U.S. Government Suppressed Freedom of Expression During Major Crises, Second Edition

Author: Craig R. Smith

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438435215

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 6468

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Examines major challenges to the Fist Amendment and focuses on the extremely important paradigm shift of freedom of expression in the post-9/11 era.

A House Divided

The Civil War and Nineteenth-Century America

Author: Jonathan Daniel Wells

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136519610

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 5310

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The Civil War is one of the most defining eras of American history, and much has been written on every aspect of the war. The volume of material available is daunting, especially when a student is trying to grasp the overall themes of the period. Jonathan Wells has distilled the war down into understandable, easy-to-read sections, with plenty of maps and illustrations, to help make sense of the battles and social, political, and cultural changes of the era. Presented here is information on: the home front the battles, both in the East and the West the status of slaves women’s role in the war and its aftermath literature and public life international aspects of the war and much more! Students will also find helpful study aids on the companion website for the book. A House Divided provides a short, readable survey of the Civil War and the Reconstruction period afterward, focusing not only on the battles, but on how Americans lived during a time of great upheaval in the country’s history, and what that legacy has meant to the country today.

The Senator and the Socialite

The True Story of America's First Black Dynasty

Author: Lawrence Otis Graham

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0061873918

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 512

View: 3885

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This is the true story of America's first black dynasty. The years after the Civil War represented an astonishing moment of opportunity for African-Americans. The rush to build a racially democratic society from the ruins of slavery is never more evident than in the personal history of Blanche Kelso Bruce and his heirs. Born a slave in 1841, Bruce became a local Mississippi sheriff, developed a growing Republican power base, amassed a real-estate fortune, and became the first black to serve a full Senate term. He married Josephine Willson, the daughter of a wealthy black Philadelphia doctor. Together they broke racial barriers as a socialite couple in 1880s Washington, D.C. By befriending President Ulysses S. Grant, abolitionist Frederick Douglass, and a cadre of liberal black and white Republicans, Bruce spent six years in the U.S. Senate, then gained appointments under four presidents (Garfield, Arthur, Harrison, and McKinley), culminating with a top Treasury post, which placed his name on all U.S. currency. During Reconstruction, the Bruce family entertained lavishly in their two Washington town houses and acquired an 800-acre plantation, homes in four states, and a fortune that allowed their son and grandchildren to attend Phillips Exeter Academy and Harvard University, beginning in 1896. The Senator's legacy would continue with his son, Roscoe, who became both a protégé of Booker T. Washington and a superintendent of Washington, D.C.'s segregated schools. When the family moved to New York in the 1920s and formed an alliance with John D. Rockefeller Jr., the Bruces became an enviable force in Harlem society. Their public battle to get their grandson admitted into Harvard University's segregated dormitories elicited the support of people like W. E. B. Du Bois and Franklin D. Roosevelt, and broke brave new ground for blacks of their day. But in the end, the Bruce dynasty's wealth and stature would disappear when the Senator's grandson landed in prison following a sensational trial and his Radcliffe-educated granddaughter married a black Hollywood actor who passed for white. By drawing on Senate records, historic documents, and the personal letters of Senator Bruce, Josephine, their colleagues, friends, children, and grandchildren, author Lawrence Otis Graham weaves a riveting social history that spans 120 years. From Mississippi to Washington, D.C., to New York, The Senator and the Socialite provides a fascinating look into the history of race and class in America.

The Fair Chase

The Epic Story of Hunting in America

Author: Philip Dray

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 1541616731

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 3425

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An award-winning historian tells the story of hunting in America, showing how this sport has shaped our national identity. From Daniel Boone to Teddy Roosevelt, hunting is one of America's most sacred-but also most fraught-traditions. It was promoted in the 19th century as a way to reconnect "soft" urban Americans with nature and to the legacy of the country's pathfinding heroes. Fair chase, a hunting code of ethics emphasizing fairness, rugged independence, and restraint towards wildlife, emerged as a worldview and gave birth to the conservation movement. But the sport's popularity also caused class, ethnic, and racial divisions, and stirred debate about the treatment of Native Americans and the role of hunting in preparing young men for war. This sweeping and balanced book offers a definitive account of hunting in America. It is essential reading for anyone interested in the evolution of our nation's foundational myths.

Saving Savannah

The City and the Civil War

Author: Jacqueline Jones

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1400078164

Category: History

Page: 510

View: 753

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Drawing on diaries, letters, newspaper articles, memoirs, and military records, an in-depth study of the city of Savannah before, during, and in the aftermath of the Civil War describes the African-American struggle for equality and freedom in the midst of war, political turmoil, and social upheaval.

Splendid failure

postwar Reconstruction in the American South

Author: Michael W. Fitzgerald

Publisher: Ivan R Dee

ISBN: 9781566637343

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 234

View: 6932

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An alternate interpretation of the role of post-Civil War radical Republican reconstruction policies demonstrates how the internal dynamics of early civil rights were influenced by southern prejudice, covering such topics as financial challenges, voting rights, and the period's modern-day ramifications.

At the Hands of Persons Unknown

The Lynching of Black America

Author: Philip Dray

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN: 0307430669

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 5762

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It is easy to shrink from our country’s brutal history of lynching. Lynching is called the last great skeleton in our nation’s closet: It terrorized all of black America, claimed thousands upon thousands of victims in the decades between the 1880s and the Second World War, and leaves invisible but deep scars to this day. The cost of pushing lynching into the shadows, however—misremembering it as isolated acts perpetrated by bigots on society’s fringes—is insupportably high: Until we understand how pervasive and socially accepted the practice was—and, more important, why this was so—it will haunt all efforts at racial reconciliation. “I could not suppress the thought,” James Baldwin once recalled of seeing the red clay hills of Georgia on his first trip to the South, “that this earth had acquired its color from the blood that had dripped down from these trees.” Throughout America, not just in the South, blacks accused of a crime—or merely of violating social or racial customs—were hunted by mobs, abducted from jails, and given summary “justice” in blatant defiance of all guarantees of due process under law. Men and women were shot, hanged, tortured, and burned, often in sadistic, picnic-like “spectacle lynchings” involving thousands of witnesses. “At the hands of persons unknown” was the official verdict rendered on most of these atrocities. The celebrated historian Philip Dray shines a clear, bright light on this dark history—its causes, perpetrators, apologists, and victims. He also tells the story of the men and women who led the long and difficult fight to expose and eradicate lynching, including Ida B. Wells, James Weldon Johnson, Walter White, and W.E.B. Du Bois. If lynching is emblematic of what is worst about America, their fight may stand for what is best: the love of justice and fairness and the conviction that one individual’s sense of right can suffice to defy the gravest of wrongs. This landmark book follows the trajectory of both forces over American history—and makes the history of lynching belong to us all. From the Hardcover edition.

The Slaves' War

The Civil War in the Words of Former Slaves

Author: Andrew Ward

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780618634002

Category: History

Page: 386

View: 2019

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Interweaving hundreds of interviews with excerpts from diaries, letters, and memoirs, a narrative history of the American Civil War captures the story of the conflict from the perspective of the African-American slaves who played a role, documenting the carnage of the battlefield, assessment of the military leaders of both sides, attitudes toward masters and liberators alike, and more.

Forever Free

The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction

Author: Eric Foner

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307834581

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 8728

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From one of our most distinguished historians, a new examination of the vitally important years of Emancipation and Reconstruction during and immediately following the Civil War–a necessary reconsideration that emphasizes the era’s political and cultural meaning for today’s America. In Forever Free, Eric Foner overturns numerous assumptions growing out of the traditional understanding of the period, which is based almost exclusively on white sources and shaped by (often unconscious) racism. He presents the period as a time of determination, especially on the part of recently emancipated black Americans, to put into effect the principles of equal rights and citizenship for all. Drawing on a wide range of long-neglected documents, he places a new emphasis on the centrality of the black experience to an understanding of the era. We see African Americans as active agents in overthrowing slavery, in helping win the Civil War, and–even more actively–in shaping Reconstruction and creating a legacy long obscured and misunderstood. Foner makes clear how, by war’s end, freed slaves in the South built on networks of church and family in order to exercise their right of suffrage as well as gain access to education, land, and employment. He shows us that the birth of the Ku Klux Klan and renewed acts of racial violence were retaliation for the progress made by blacks soon after the war. He refutes lingering misconceptions about Reconstruction, including the attribution of its ills to corrupt African American politicians and “carpetbaggers,” and connects it to the movements for civil rights and racial justice. Joshua Brown’s illustrated commentary on the era’s graphic art and photographs complements the narrative. He offers a unique portrait of how Americans envisioned their world and time. Forever Free is an essential contribution to our understanding of the events that fundamentally reshaped American life after the Civil War–a persuasive reading of history that transforms our sense of the era from a time of failure and despair to a threshold of hope and achievement.

After Lincoln

How the North Won the Civil War and Lost the Peace

Author: A. J. Langguth

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451617321

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 305

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A historical chronicle examines the Reconstruction era, covering such topics as the impeachment of Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant's efforts to quash a rising KKK, and Rutherford B. Hayes' agreement to remove troops from the South.

The Wars of Reconstruction

The Brief, Violent History of America's Most Progressive Era

Author: Douglas R. Egerton

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1608195740

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 1634

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A groundbreaking new history, telling the stories of hundreds of African-American activists and officeholders who risked their lives for equality-in the face of murderous violence-in the years after the Civil War. By 1870, just five years after Confederate surrender and thirteen years after the Dred Scott decision ruled blacks ineligible for citizenship, Congressional action had ended slavery and given the vote to black men. That same year, Hiram Revels and Joseph Hayne Rainey became the first African-American U.S. senator and congressman respectively. In South Carolina, only twenty years after the death of arch-secessionist John C. Calhoun, a black man, Jasper J. Wright, took a seat on the state's Supreme Court. Not even the most optimistic abolitionists thought such milestones would occur in their lifetimes. The brief years of Reconstruction marked the United States' most progressive moment prior to the civil rights movement. Previous histories of Reconstruction have focused on Washington politics. But in this sweeping, prodigiously researched narrative, Douglas Egerton brings a much bigger, even more dramatic story into view, exploring state and local politics and tracing the struggles of some fifteen hundred African-American officeholders, in both the North and South, who fought entrenched white resistance. Tragically, their movement was met by ruthless violence-not just riotous mobs, but also targeted assassination. With stark evidence, Egerton shows that Reconstruction, often cast as a "failure?? or a doomed experiment, was rolled back by murderous force. The Wars of Reconstruction is a major and provocative contribution to American history.

The Original Black Elite

Daniel Murray and the Story of a Forgotten Era

Author: Elizabeth Dowling Taylor

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062346113

Category: Social Science

Page: 544

View: 744

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In this outstanding cultural biography, the author of the New York Times bestseller A Slave in the White House chronicles a critical yet overlooked chapter in American history: the inspiring rise and calculated fall of the black elite, from Emancipation through Reconstruction to the Jim Crow Era—embodied in the experiences of an influential figure of the time, academic, entrepreneur, and political activist and black history pioneer Daniel Murray. In the wake of the Civil War, Daniel Murray, born free and educated in Baltimore, was in the vanguard of Washington, D.C.’s black upper class. Appointed Assistant Librarian at the Library of Congress—at a time when government appointments were the most prestigious positions available for blacks—Murray became wealthy through his business as a construction contractor and married a college-educated socialite. The Murrays’ social circles included some of the first African-American U.S. Senators and Congressmen, and their children went to the best colleges—Harvard and Cornell. Though Murray and other black elite of his time were primed to assimilate into the cultural fabric as Americans first and people of color second, their prospects were crushed by Jim Crow segregation and the capitulation to white supremacist groups by the government, which turned a blind eye to their unlawful—often murderous—acts. Elizabeth Dowling Taylor traces the rise, fall, and disillusionment of upper-class African Americans, revealing that they were a representation not of hypothetical achievement but what could be realized by African Americans through education and equal opportunities. As she makes clear, these well-educated and wealthy elite were living proof that African Americans did not lack ability to fully participate in the social contract as white supremacists claimed, making their subsequent fall when Reconstruction was prematurely abandoned all the more tragic. Illuminating and powerful, her magnificent work brings to life a dark chapter of American history that too many Americans have yet to recognize.

Help Me to Find My People

The African American Search for Family Lost in Slavery

Author: Heather Andrea Williams

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807882658

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 9520

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After the Civil War, African Americans placed poignant "information wanted" advertisements in newspapers, searching for missing family members. Inspired by the power of these ads, Heather Andrea Williams uses slave narratives, letters, interviews, public records, and diaries to guide readers back to devastating moments of family separation during slavery when people were sold away from parents, siblings, spouses, and children. Williams explores the heartbreaking stories of separation and the long, usually unsuccessful journeys toward reunification. Examining the interior lives of the enslaved and freedpeople as they tried to come to terms with great loss, Williams grounds their grief, fear, anger, longing, frustration, and hope in the history of American slavery and the domestic slave trade. Williams follows those who were separated, chronicles their searches, and documents the rare experience of reunion. She also explores the sympathy, indifference, hostility, or empathy expressed by whites about sundered black families. Williams shows how searches for family members in the post-Civil War era continue to reverberate in African American culture in the ongoing search for family history and connection across generations.

The Mis-education of the Negro

Author: Carter Godwin Woodson

Publisher: ReadaClassic.com

ISBN: N.A

Category: African Americans

Page: 207

View: 8998

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Woodson's classic work of criticism explores how the education received by blacks has failed to give them an appreciation of themselves as a race and their contributions to history. Woodson puts forward a program that calls for the educated to learn about their past and serve the black community. (Education/Teaching)

Diary of a Contraband

The Civil War Passage of a Black Sailor

Author: William Benjamin Gould

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804747080

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 373

View: 2972

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The heart of this book is the remarkable Civil War diary of the author’s great-grandfather, William Benjamin Gould, an escaped slave who served in the United States Navy from 1862 until the end of the war. The diary vividly records Gould’s activity as part of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron off the coast of North Carolina and Virginia; his visits to New York and Boston; the pursuit to Nova Scotia of a hijacked Confederate cruiser; and service in European waters pursuing Confederate ships constructed in Great Britain and France. Gould’s diary is one of only three known diaries of African American sailors in the Civil War. It is distinguished not only by its details and eloquent tone (often deliberately understated and sardonic), but also by its reflections on war, on race, on race relations in the Navy, and on what African Americans might expect after the war. The book includes introductory chapters that establish the context of the diary narrative, an annotated version of the diary, a brief account of Gould’s life in Massachusetts after the war, and William B. Gould IV’s thoughts about the legacy of his great-grandfather and his own journey of discovery in learning about this remarkable man.