Cannibal Island

Death in a Siberian Gulag

Author: Nicolas Werth

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691130835

Category: History

Page: 223

View: 4753

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During the spring of 1933, Stalin's police rounded up nearly one hundred thousand people as part of the Soviet regime's "cleansing" of Moscow and Leningrad and deported them to Siberia. Many of the victims were sent to labor camps, but ten thousand of them were dumped in a remote wasteland and left to fend for themselves. Cannibal Island reveals the shocking, grisly truth about their fate. These people were abandoned on the island of Nazino without food or shelter. Left there to starve and to die, they eventually began to eat each other. Nicolas Werth, a French historian of the Soviet era, reconstructs their gruesome final days using rare archival material from deep inside the Stalinist vaults. Werth skillfully weaves this episode into a broader story about the Soviet frenzy in the 1930s to purge society of all those deemed to be unfit. For Stalin, these undesirables included criminals, opponents of forced collectivization, vagabonds, gypsies, even entire groups in Soviet society such as the "kulaks" and their families. Werth sets his story within the broader social and political context of the period, giving us for the first time a full picture of how Stalin's system of "special villages" worked, how hundreds of thousands of Soviet citizens were moved about the country in wholesale mass transportations, and how this savage bureaucratic machinery functioned on the local, regional, and state levels. Cannibal Island challenges us to confront unpleasant facts not only about Stalin's punitive social controls and his failed Soviet utopia, but about every generation's capacity for brutality--including our own.

Life and Terror in Stalin's Russia, 1934-1941

Author: Robert W. Thurston

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300074420

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 6547

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Examining Stalin's reign of terror, this text argues that the Soviet people were not simply victims but also actors in the violence, criticisms and local decisions of the 1930s. It suggests that more believed in Stalin's quest to eliminate internal enemies than were frightened by it.

Stalin's Slave Ships

Kolyma, the Gulag Fleet, and the Role of the West

Author: Martin J. Bollinger

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275981006

Category: History

Page: 217

View: 2528

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Between 1932 and 1953, a fleet of ordinary cargo ships was pressed into extraordinary service. The fleet's task was to relocate approximately one-million forced laborers to the Soviet Gulag in Kolyma, located along the Arctic Circle in far northeastern Siberia. Bollinger presents the often-horrific stories of the Gulag fleet and its passengers and reveals the unwitting role of the United States government in the operation.

Siberia

A Cultural History

Author: Anthony Haywood

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN: 1908493364

Category: Travel

Page: 344

View: 9641

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Before Russians crossed the Urals Mountains in the sixteenth century to settle their ‘colony’ in North Asia, they heard rumours about bountiful fur, of bizarre people without eyes who ate by shrugging their shoulders and of a land where trees exploded from cold. This region of frozen tundra, endless forest and humming steppe between the Urals and the Pacific Ocean was a vast, strange and frightening paradise. It was Siberia. Siberia is a cradle of civilizations, the birthplace of ancient Turkic empires and home to the cultures of indigenes, including peoples whose ancestors migrated to the Americas. It was a promised land to which bonded peasants could flee their cruel masters, yet also a ‘white hell’ across which exiles shuffled in felt shoes and chains. If in Stalin’s era Siberia became synonymous with the gulag, today it is a vast region of bustling metropolises and magnificent landscapes, a place where the humdrum, the beautiful and the bizarre ignite the imagination. Tracing the historical contours of Siberia, A. J. Haywood offers a detailed account of the architectural and cultural landmarks of cities such as Irkutsk, Tobolsk, Barnaul and Novosibirsk.

Stalinist Terror

New Perspectives

Author: John Arch Getty,Roberta Thompson Manning

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521446709

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 5078

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This collection of essays contributes to the understanding of Stalinist terror in the 1930s. Although Stalin remains the central personality in the terror, other leaders, institutions, and social groups played important roles, and by analyzing them helps to provide a more complete and balanced view of the phenomenon of the terror as a whole.

Global Environmental Politics

Concepts, Theories and Case Studies

Author: Gabriela Kütting

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136920994

Category: Political Science

Page: 198

View: 7808

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Global Environmental Politics is the perfect introduction to this increasingly significant area. The text combines an accessible introduction to the most important environmental theories and concepts with a series of detailed case studies of the most pressing environmental problems. Features and benefits of the book: Explains the most important concepts and theories in environmental politics. Introduces environmental politics within the context of political science and international relations theories. Demonstrates how the concepts and theories apply in a wide variety of real world contexts. Case studies include the most important environmental issues from climate change and biodiversity to forests and marine pollution. Each chapter is written by an established international authority in the field. ? This exciting new textbook is essential reading all students of environmental politics and will be of great interest to students of International Relations and Political Economy.

The Soviet Union under Brezhnev

Author: William J. Tompson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317881729

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 556

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The Soviet Union Under Brezhnev provides an accessible post-Soviet perspective on the history of the USSR from the mid-1960’s to the mid-1980’s. It challenges both the ‘evil empire’ image of the USSR that was widespread in the early 1980’s and the ‘stagnation’ label attached to the period by Soviet reformers under Gorbachev. The book makes use of a range of memoirs, interviews, archival documents and other sources not available before 1990 to place Brezhnev and his epoch in a broader historical context. The author: examines high politics, foreign policy and policy making explores broader social, cultural and demographic trends presents a picture of Soviet society in the crucial decades prior to the upheavals and crises of the late 1980’s While stopping well short of a full-scale rehabilitation of Brezhnev, Tompson rejects the prevailing image of the Soviet leader as a colourless non-entity, drawing attention to Brezhnev’s real political skills, as well as his faults, and to the systemic roots of many of the problems he faced.

The Woman Beneath the Skin

A Doctor's Patients in Eighteenth-century Germany

Author: Barbara Duden,Thomas Dunlap

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674954045

Category: Medical

Page: 241

View: 8812

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In this provocative study, Barbara Duden asserts that the most basic biological and medical terms we use to describe our own bodies - male and female, healthy and sick - are in fact cultural constructions.

The Unknown Gulag

The Lost World of Stalin's Special Settlements

Author: Lynne Viola

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0195187695

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 2751

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One of Stalin's most heinous acts was the ruthless repression of millions of peasants in the early 1930s, an act that established the very foundations of the gulag. Now, with the opening of Soviet archives, an entirely new dimension of Stalin's brutality has been uncovered.

The Palgrave Handbook of Prison Tourism

Author: Jacqueline Z. Wilson,Sarah Hodgkinson,Justin Piché,Kevin Walby

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137561351

Category: Social Science

Page: 1045

View: 7884

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This extensive Handbook addresses a range of contemporary issues related to Prison Tourism across the world. It is divided into seven sections: Ethics, Human Rights and Penal Spectatorship; Carceral Retasking, Curation and Commodification of Punishment; Meanings of Prison Life and Representations of Punishment in Tourism Sites; Death and Torture in Prison Museums; Colonialism, Relics of Empire and Prison Museums; Tourism and Operational Prisons; and Visitor Consumption and Experiences of Prison Tourism. The Handbook explores global debates within the field of Prison Tourism inquiry; spanning a diverse range of topics from political imprisonment and persecution in Taiwan to interpretive programming in Alcatraz, and the representation of incarcerated Indigenous peoples to prison graffiti. This Handbook is the first to present a thorough examination of Prison Tourism that is truly global in scope. With contributions from both well-renowned scholars and up-and-coming researchers in the field, from a wide variety of disciplines, the Handbook comprises an international collection at the cutting edge of Prison Tourism studies. Students and teachers from disciplines ranging from Criminology to Cultural Studies will find the text invaluable as the definitive work in the field of Prison Tourism.

The Human Rights Paradox

Universality and Its Discontents

Author: Steve J. Stern,Scott Straus

Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres

ISBN: 0299299732

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 1988

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Human rights are paradoxical. Advocates across the world invoke the idea that such rights belong to all people, no matter who or where they are. But since humans can only realize their rights in particular places, human rights are both always and never universal. The Human Rights Paradox is the first book to fully embrace this contradiction and reframe human rights as history, contemporary social advocacy, and future prospect. In case studies that span Africa, Latin America, South and Southeast Asia, and the United States, contributors carefully illuminate how social actors create the imperative of human rights through relationships whose entanglements of the global and the local are so profound that one cannot exist apart from the other. These chapters provocatively analyze emerging twenty-first-century horizons of human rights—on one hand, the simultaneous promise and peril of global rights activism through social media, and on the other, the force of intergenerational rights linked to environmental concerns that are both local and global. Taken together, they demonstrate how local struggles and realities transform classic human rights concepts, including “victim,” “truth,” and “justice.” Edited by Steve J. Stern and Scott Straus, The Human Rights Paradox enables us to consider the consequences—for history, social analysis, politics, and advocacy—of understanding that human rights belong both to “humanity” as abstraction as well as to specific people rooted in particular locales.

Red Famine

Stalin's War on Ukraine

Author: Anne Applebaum

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0385538863

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 7359

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AN ECONOMIST BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR From the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Gulag and the National Book Award finalist Iron Curtain, a revelatory history of one of Stalin's greatest crimes—the consequences of which still resonate today In 1929 Stalin launched his policy of agricultural collectivization—in effect a second Russian revolution—which forced millions of peasants off their land and onto collective farms. The result was a catastrophic famine, the most lethal in European history. At least five million people died between 1931 and 1933 in the USSR. But instead of sending relief the Soviet state made use of the catastrophe to rid itself of a political problem. In Red Famine, Anne Applebaum argues that more than three million of those dead were Ukrainians who perished not because they were accidental victims of a bad policy but because the state deliberately set out to kill them. Applebaum proves what has long been suspected: after a series of rebellions unsettled the province, Stalin set out to destroy the Ukrainian peasantry. The state sealed the republic’s borders and seized all available food. Starvation set in rapidly, and people ate anything: grass, tree bark, dogs, corpses. In some cases, they killed one another for food. Devastating and definitive, Red Famine captures the horror of ordinary people struggling to survive extraordinary evil. Today, Russia, the successor to the Soviet Union, has placed Ukrainian independence in its sights once more. Applebaum’s compulsively readable narrative recalls one of the worst crimes of the twentieth century, and shows how it may foreshadow a new threat to the political order in the twenty-first.

Man is Wolf to Man

Surviving the Gulag

Author: Janusz Bardach,Kathleen Gleeson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520221529

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 408

View: 2440

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Chronicles the author's life during his stay at the Kolyma prison camp in Siberia

Stalin's Genocides

Author: Norman M. Naimark

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691152381

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 2002

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Between the early 1930s and his death in 1953, Joseph Stalin had more than a million of his own citizens executed. This book is the chilling story of these crimes. The book puts forward the argument that mass killings under Stalin in the 1930s were indeed acts of genocide and that the Soviet dictator himself was behind them.

Season of Ash

A Novel in Three Acts

Author: Jorge Volpi Escalante

Publisher: Open Letter Books

ISBN: 1934824100

Category: Fiction

Page: 413

View: 2135

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The Soviet biologist Irina Granina has experienced the worst of Communism, struggling to free her husband from the gulag for years. Following the rise of Gorbachev, her husband finally emerges a changed man, but then Irina is forced to witness the worst of capitalism, as her daughter disappears into the new consumer society and she loses her husband again, this time to greed and a lust for power. In the West, Jennifer Moore, a wealthy American, takes a high-ranking job at the IMF, hoping to bring the free market economy to all, whilst dealing with her philandering husband.

A Crime So Monstrous

Face-to-Face with Modern-Day Slavery

Author: E. Benjamin Skinner

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781416565628

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 6405

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To be a moral witness is perhaps the highest calling of journalism, and in this unforgettable, highly readable account of contemporary slavery, author Benjamin Skinner travels around the globe to personally tell stories that need to be told -- and heard. As Samantha Power and Philip Gourevitch did for genocide, Skinner has now done for modern-day slavery. With years of reporting in such places as Haiti, Sudan, India, Eastern Europe, The Netherlands, and, yes, even suburban America, he has produced a vivid testament and moving reportage on one of the great evils of our time. There are more slaves in the world today than at any time in history. After spending four years visiting a dozen countries where slavery flourishes, Skinner tells the story, in gripping narrative style, of individuals who live in slavery, those who have escaped from bondage, those who own or traffic in slaves, and the mixed political motives of those who seek to combat the crime. Skinner infiltrates trafficking networks and slave sales on five continents, exposing a modern flesh trade never before portrayed in such proximity. From mega-harems in Dubai to illicit brothels in Bucharest, from slave quarries in India to child markets in Haiti, he explores the underside of a world we scarcely recognize as our own and lays bare a parallel universe where human beings are bought, sold, used, and discarded. He travels from the White House to war zones and immerses us in the political and flesh-and-blood battles on the front lines of the unheralded new abolitionist movement. At the heart of the story are the slaves themselves. Their stories are heartbreaking but, in the midst of tragedy, readers discover a quiet dignity that leads some slaves to resist and aspire to freedom. Despite being abandoned by the international community, despite suffering a crime so monstrous as to strip their awareness of their own humanity, somehow, some enslaved men regain their dignity, some enslaved women learn to trust men, and some enslaved children manage to be kids. Skinner bears witness for them, and for the millions who are held in the shadows. In so doing, he has written one of the most morally courageous books of our time, one that will long linger in the conscience of all who encounter it, and one that -- just perhaps -- may move the world to constructive action.

Leningrad

Tragedy of a City Under Siege, 1941-44

Author: Anna Reid

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 0747599521

Category: History

Page: 492

View: 1967

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The siege of Leningrad is one of the great stories of extraordinary and heroic endurance in World War II

KL

A History of the Nazi Concentration Camps

Author: Nikolaus Wachsmann

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1429943726

Category: History

Page: 880

View: 9993

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The first comprehensive history of the Nazi concentration camps In a landmark work of history, Nikolaus Wachsmann offers an unprecedented, integrated account of the Nazi concentration camps from their inception in 1933 through their demise, seventy years ago, in the spring of 1945. The Third Reich has been studied in more depth than virtually any other period in history, and yet until now there has been no history of the camp system that tells the full story of its broad development and the everyday experiences of its inhabitants, both perpetrators and victims, and all those living in what Primo Levi called "the gray zone." In KL, Wachsmann fills this glaring gap in our understanding. He not only synthesizes a new generation of scholarly work, much of it untranslated and unknown outside of Germany, but also presents startling revelations, based on many years of archival research, about the functioning and scope of the camp system. Examining, close up, life and death inside the camps, and adopting a wider lens to show how the camp system was shaped by changing political, legal, social, economic, and military forces, Wachsmann produces a unified picture of the Nazi regime and its camps that we have never seen before. A boldly ambitious work of deep importance, KL is destined to be a classic in the history of the twentieth century.

Koba the Dread

Laughter and the Twenty Million

Author: Martin Amis

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101910267

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 9245

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A brilliant weave of personal involvement, vivid biography and political insight, Koba the Dread is the successor to Martin Amis’s award-winning memoir, Experience. Koba the Dread captures the appeal of one of the most powerful belief systems of the 20th century — one that spread through the world, both captivating it and staining it red. It addresses itself to the central lacuna of 20th-century thought: the indulgence of Communism by the intellectuals of the West. In between the personal beginnings and the personal ending, Amis gives us perhaps the best one-hundred pages ever written about Stalin: Koba the Dread, Iosif the Terrible. The author’s father, Kingsley Amis, though later reactionary in tendency, was a “Comintern dogsbody” (as he would come to put it) from 1941 to 1956. His second-closest, and then his closest friend (after the death of the poet Philip Larkin), was Robert Conquest, our leading Sovietologist whose book of 1968, The Great Terror, was second only to Solzhenitsyn’s The Gulag Archipelago in undermining the USSR. The present memoir explores these connections. Stalin said that the death of one person was tragic, the death of a million a mere “statistic.” Koba the Dread, during whose course the author absorbs a particular, a familial death, is a rebuttal of Stalin’s aphorism.