Poverty and Welfare 1830-1914

Author: Peter Murray

Publisher: Hodder Education

ISBN: 9780340618912

Category: History

Page: 134

View: 5293

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This volume examines a number of themes central to 19th-century social and political history in Britain. Looking in detail at the 1834 reform of the Poor Law, the author also considers the context in which the Poor Law was framed and the social values of those who supported and opposed it. The changing attitudes to poverty are considered with a review of the question, were the poor better treated in 1914 than they had been in 1830?. The book also looks at the complex historiography of the subject.

Poverty and the Poor Law in Ireland, 1850-1914

Author: Virginia Crossman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1846319412

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 2260

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'Poverty and the Poor Law in Ireland' provides a detailed and comprehensive assessment of the ideological basis and practical operation of the poor law system in the post-famine period in Ireland.

Social Policy and Social Justice

Author: Michael Reisch

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1483320758

Category: Social Science

Page: 544

View: 9035

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Social Policy and Social Justice provides today's students and tomorrow's practitioners with a comprehensive overview of U.S. social policy and the policymaking process. Author and editor Michael Reisch brings together experts in the field to help students understand these policies and prepare them for the emerging realities that will shape practice in the 21st century. This text explores the critical contextual components of social policy—including history, ideology, political-economy, and culture—and demonstrates major substantive areas of policy such as income maintenance and health/mental health.

Native to the Republic

Empire, Social Citizenship, and Everyday Life in Marseille since 1945

Author: Minayo Nasiali

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 150170673X

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 7606

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In Native to the Republic, Minayo Nasiali traces the process through which expectations about living standards and decent housing came to be understood as social rights in late twentieth-century France. These ideas evolved through everyday negotiations between ordinary people, municipal authorities, central state bureaucrats, elected officials, and social scientists in postwar Marseille. Nasiali shows how these local-level interactions fundamentally informed evolving ideas about French citizenship and the built environment, namely that the institutionalization of social citizenship also created new spaces for exclusion. Although everyone deserved social rights, some were supposedly more deserving than others. From the 1940s through the early 1990s, metropolitan discussions about the potential for town planning to transform everyday life were shaped by colonial and, later, postcolonial migration within the changing empire. As a port and the historical gateway to and from the colonies, Marseille's interrelated projects to develop welfare institutions and manage urban space make it a particularly significant site for exploring this uneven process. Neighborhood debates about the meaning and goals of modernization contributed to normative understandings about which residents deserved access to expanding social rights. Nasiali argues that assumptions about racial, social, and spatial differences profoundly structured a differential system of housing in postwar France. Native to the Republic highlights the value of new approaches to studying empire, membership in the nation, and the welfare state by showing how social citizenship was not simply constituted within "imagined communities" but also through practices involving the contestation of spaces and the enjoyment of rights.

Medicine and the Workhouse

Author: Jonathan Reinarz,Leonard Schwarz

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN: 1580464483

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 9589

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"This book had its origins in a two-day conference on 'Medicine and the Workhouse' in November 2008, sponsored by the University of Birmingham and the Wellcome Trust"--Preface.

Policing Prostitution, 1856–1886

Deviance, Surveillance and Morality

Author: Catherine Lee

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317321480

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 4169

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Focusing on the ports, dockyards and garrison towns of Kent, this study examines the social and economic factors that could cause a woman to turn to prostitution, and how such women were policed.

Dickens, Religion and Society

Author: Robert Butterworth

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137558717

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 237

View: 968

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Dickens, Religion and Society examines the centrality of Dickens's religious attitudes to the social criticism he is famous for, shedding new light in the process on such matters as the presentation of Fagin as a villainous Jew, the hostile portrayal of trade unions in Hard Times and Dickens's sentimentality.

Gendered States of Punishment and Welfare

Feminist Political Economy, Primitive Accumulation and the Law

Author: Adrienne Roberts

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1134880138

Category: Political Science

Page: 204

View: 620

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This book presents a feminist historical materialist analysis of the ways in which the law, policing and penal regimes have overlapped with social policies to coercively discipline the poor and marginalized sectors of the population throughout the history of capitalism. Roberts argues that capitalism has always been underpinned by the use of state power to discursively construct and materially manage those sectors of the population who are most resistant to and marginalized by the instantiation and deepening of capitalism. The book reveals that the law, along with social welfare regimes, have operated in ways that are highly gendered, as gender – along with race – has been a key axis along which difference has been constructed and regulated. It offers an important theoretical and empirical contribution that disrupts the tendency for mainstream and critical work within IPE to view capitalism primarily as an economic relation. Roberts also provides a feminist critique of the failure of mainstream and critical scholars to analyse the gendered nature of capitalist social relations of production and social reproduction. Exploring a range of issues related to the nature of the capitalist state, the creation and protection of private property, the governance of poverty, the structural compulsions underpinning waged work and the place of women in paid and unpaid labour, this book is of great use to students and scholars of IPE, gender studies, social work, law, sociology, criminology, global development studies, political science and history.

Sickness, medical welfare and the English poor, 1750-1834

Author: Steven King

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1526129027

Category: Medical

Page: N.A

View: 4800

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At the core of this book are three central contentions: That medical welfare became the totemic function of the Old Poor Law in its last few decades; that the poor themselves were able to negotiate this medical welfare rather than simply being subject to it; and that being doctored and institutionalised became part of the norm for the sick poor by the 1820s, in a way that had not been the case in the 1750s. Exploring the lives and medical experiences of the poor largely in their own words, Sickness, medical welfare and the English poor offers a comprehensive reinterpretation of the so-called crisis of the Old Poor Law from the later eighteenth century. The sick poor became an insistent presence in the lives of officials and parishes and the (largely positive) way that communities responded to their dire needs must cause us to rethink the role and character of the poor law.

Migration, Settlement and Belonging in Europe, 1500-1930s

Comparative Perspectives

Author: Steven King,Anne Winter

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1782381465

Category: Social Science

Page: 326

View: 7899

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The issues around settlement, belonging, and poor relief have for too long been understood largely from the perspective of England and Wales. This volume offers a pan-European survey that encompasses Switzerland, Prussia, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Britain. It explores how the conception of belonging changed over time and space from the 1500s onwards, how communities dealt with the welfare expectations of an increasingly mobile population that migrated both within and between states, the welfare rights that were attached to those who "belonged," and how ordinary people secured access to welfare resources. What emerged was a sophisticated European settlement system, which on the one hand structured itself to limit the claims of the poor, and yet on the other was peculiarly sensitive to their demands and negotiations.

Why Nations Fail

The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty

Author: Daron Acemoglu,James A. Robinson

Publisher: Crown Books

ISBN: 0307719227

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 529

View: 8508

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An award-winning professor of economics at MIT and a Harvard University political scientist and economist evaluate the reasons that some nations are poor while others succeed, outlining provocative perspectives that support theories about the importance of institutions. Reprint.

The Greater Journey

Americans in Paris

Author: David McCullough

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781416576891

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 4356

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The #1 bestseller that tells the remarkable story of the generations of American artists, writers, and doctors who traveled to Paris, the intellectual, scientific, and artistic capital of the western world, fell in love with the city and its people, and changed America through what they learned, told by America’s master historian, David McCullough. Not all pioneers went west. In The Greater Journey, David McCullough tells the enthralling, inspiring—and until now, untold—story of the adventurous American artists, writers, doctors, politicians, and others who set off for Paris in the years between 1830 and 1900, hungry to learn and to excel in their work. What they achieved would profoundly alter American history. Elizabeth Blackwell, the first female doctor in America, was one of this intrepid band. Another was Charles Sumner, whose encounters with black students at the Sorbonne inspired him to become the most powerful voice for abolition in the US Senate. Friends James Fenimore Cooper and Samuel F. B. Morse worked unrelentingly every day in Paris, Morse not only painting what would be his masterpiece, but also bringing home his momentous idea for the telegraph. Harriet Beecher Stowe traveled to Paris to escape the controversy generated by her book, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Three of the greatest American artists ever—sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens, painters Mary Cassatt and John Singer Sargent—flourished in Paris, inspired by French masters. Almost forgotten today, the heroic American ambassador Elihu Washburne bravely remained at his post through the Franco-Prussian War, the long Siege of Paris, and the nightmare of the Commune. His vivid diary account of the starvation and suffering endured by the people of Paris is published here for the first time. Telling their stories with power and intimacy, McCullough brings us into the lives of remarkable men and women who, in Saint-Gaudens’ phrase, longed “to soar into the blue.

Urban Poverty in Britain 1830-1914

Author: James H. Treble

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351172069

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 2358

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First published in 1979, Urban Poverty in Britain 1830-1914 examines the plight of the poor in towns as a direct result of industrialization. This valuable study examines the major causes of poverty – low pay, casual labour, unemployment, sickness, widowhood, large families, old age, drink and personal failings – and society’s response to the problem. It also pays attention to the changes in food consumption brought about by migration to the urban areas. Detailed accounts of specific problems and specific situations are combined with a look at the broader questions, and subsequently provides a thorough account of urban poverty in this period.

A History of Modern Europe

From the Renaissance to the Present, Third Edition

Author: John Merriman

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393934330

Category: History

Page: 1239

View: 8855

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Available in both one-volume and two-volume paperback editions, A History of Modern Europe presents a panoramic survey of modern Europe from the Renaissance to the present day. A single author lends a unified approach and consistent style throughout, with an emphasis on the connections of events and people over time. The Third Edition, like the two before it, is authoritative and up-to-date. New to the Third Edition is the theme of empire. From the imperial rivalries between France and Spain in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, through the rise and fall of the Ottoman Turkish empire, and on into the imperial history of the twentieth century—decolonization, the spread of the Soviet empire, and the imperial power of the United States—the theme of empire helps students find commonalities among the events of European history.

Death, Grief and Poverty in Britain, 1870–1914

Author: Julie-Marie Strange

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139445870

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9019

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With high mortality rates, it has been assumed that the poor in Victorian and Edwardian Britain did not mourn their dead. Contesting this approach, Julie-Marie Strange studies the expression of grief among the working class, demonstrating that poverty increased - rather than deadened - it. She illustrates the mourning practices of the working classes through chapters addressing care of the corpse, the funeral, the cemetery, commemoration, and high infant mortality rates. The 2005 book draws on a broad range of sources to analyse the feelings and behaviours of the labouring poor, using not only personal testimony but also fiction, journalism, and official reports. It concludes that poor people did not only use spoken or written words to express their grief, but also complex symbols, actions and, significantly, silence. This book will be an invaluable contribution to an important and neglected area of social and cultural history.

Industrialisation and Society

A Social History, 1830-1951

Author: Eric Hopkins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134660979

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 7638

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Indusrialisation and Society provides an essential introduction to the effects of industrialisation on British society, from Queen Victoria's reign to the birth of the welfare state in the 1940s. This book deals with the remarkable social consequences of the industrial revolution, as Britain changed into an urban society based on industry. As the first nation to undergo an industrial revolution, Britain was also the first to deal with the unprecedented social problems of rapid urbanisation combined with an unparalleled growth in population. Industrialisation and Society looks at contemporary ways in which the government and ordinary people tried to cope with these new pressures, and studies their reactions to the unforseen consequences of the steam revolution. In particular, this indispensable book considers: * the Victorian inheritance * Edwardian England and the Liberal reforms * the two world wars * the Welfare State.