History of Rome

Down to the Age of Constantine

Author: Max Cary,H.H. Scullard

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1349024155

Category: History

Page: 694

View: 6476

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A History of Rome

Down to the Reign of Constantine

Author: M. Cary,H. H. Scullard

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

ISBN: 9780312383954

Category: History

Page: 694

View: 3284

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A classic survey of Roman history, art, economic life, and religion through Constantine's rise to power.

Ancient Rome

A Military and Political History

Author: Christopher S. Mackay

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521809184

Category: History

Page: 395

View: 8297

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Traces the political and military history of Roman Republic and Empire, from the Italian Iron Age to the last emperor in 476 A.D., examining the link between political institutions and military campaigns, the rise of Christianity, the eventual downfall of the western empire, and other key topics.

The History of the Medieval World: From the Conversion of Constantine to the First Crusade

Author: S. Wise Bauer

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393059758

Category: History

Page: 746

View: 8997

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"Chronicles the period between the 4th and 12th centuries, when rulers in Europe, the Mideast and Asia turned to religious reasons to justify political and military action, a time that included the development of Islam, the crowning of Charlemagne and the rise of the T'ang Dynasty. By the author of The History of the Ancient World."

The Age of Constantine the Great

Author: Jacob Burckhardt

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520046801

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 1206

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Chronicles the major events that took place between the accession of Diocletian and the death of Constantine and discusses the people, places, and issues that influenced society during that time.

A Short History of the Papacy in the Middle Ages

Author: Walter Ullmann

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134415354

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 9116

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This classic text outlines the development of the Papacy as an institution in the Middle Ages. With profound knowledge, insight and sophistication, Walter Ullmann traces the course of papal history from the late Roman Empire to its eventual decline in the Renaissance. The focus of this survey is on the institution and the idea of papacy rather than individual figures, recognizing the shaping power of the popes' roles that made them outstanding personalities. The transpersonal idea, Ullmann argues, sprang from Christianity itself and led to the Papacy as an institution sui generis.

History of the Roman People

Author: Allen M. Ward,Fritz M. Heichelheim,Cedric A. Yeo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315511207

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 4738

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A History of the Roman People provides a comprehensive analytical survey of Roman history from its prehistoric roots in Italy and the wider Mediterranean world to the dissolution of the Roman Empire in Late Antiquity ca. A.D. 600. Clearly organized and highly readable, the text's narrative of major political and military events provides a chronological and conceptual framework for chapters on social, economic, and cultural developments of the periods covered. Major topics are treated separately so that students can easily grasp key concepts and ideas.

How Rome Fell

Death of a Superpower

Author: Adrian Keith Goldsworthy

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300155603

Category: History

Page: 558

View: 2245

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The author discusses how the Roman Empire--an empire without a serious rival--rotted from within, its rulers and institutions putting short-term ambition and personal survival over the wider good of the state.

The Birth of the West

Rome, Germany, France, and the Creation of Europe in the Tenth Century

Author: Paul Collins

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN: 161039013X

Category: History

Page: 484

View: 3388

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A narrative history of the origins of Western civilization argues that Europe was transformed in the tenth century from a continent rife with violence and ignorance to a continent on the rise.

The Age Of Martyrs

Christianity from Diocletian (284) to Constantine (337)

Author: Abbot Giuseppe Ricciotti

Publisher: TAN Books

ISBN: 150510453X

Category: Religion

Page: 318

View: 9267

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In The Age of Martyrs; the famous Catholic historian Abbot Giuseppe Ricciotti records the epochal events of Roman history from the rise of Diocletian (284) to the death of Constantine the Great (337); a period which witnessed the last and greatest of the 10 persecutions of the Christians by the Roman government. Impr.

Constantine's Sword

The Church and the Jews

Author: James Carroll

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780618219087

Category: Religion

Page: 756

View: 2011

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Examines the two-thousand-year relationship between Christianity and Judaism, examining the long entrenched tradition of anti-Semitism that culminated in the Church's failure to protest the Holocaust during World War II.

SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome

Author: Mary Beard

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 1631491253

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 7007

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A sweeping, revisionist history of the Roman Empire from one of our foremost classicists. Ancient Rome was an imposing city even by modern standards, a sprawling imperial metropolis of more than a million inhabitants, a "mixture of luxury and filth, liberty and exploitation, civic pride and murderous civil war" that served as the seat of power for an empire that spanned from Spain to Syria. Yet how did all this emerge from what was once an insignificant village in central Italy? In S.P.Q.R., world-renowned classicist Mary Beard narrates the unprecedented rise of a civilization that even two thousand years later still shapes many of our most fundamental assumptions about power, citizenship, responsibility, political violence, empire, luxury, and beauty. From the foundational myth of Romulus and Remus to 212 ce—nearly a thousand years later—when the emperor Caracalla gave Roman citizenship to every free inhabitant of the empire, S.P.Q.R. (the abbreviation of "The Senate and People of Rome") examines not just how we think of ancient Rome but challenges the comfortable historical perspectives that have existed for centuries by exploring how the Romans thought of themselves: how they challenged the idea of imperial rule, how they responded to terrorism and revolution, and how they invented a new idea of citizenship and nation. Opening the book in 63 bce with the famous clash between the populist aristocrat Catiline and Cicero, the renowned politician and orator, Beard animates this “terrorist conspiracy,” which was aimed at the very heart of the Republic, demonstrating how this singular event would presage the struggle between democracy and autocracy that would come to define much of Rome’s subsequent history. Illustrating how a classical democracy yielded to a self-confident and self-critical empire, S.P.Q.R. reintroduces us, though in a wholly different way, to famous and familiar characters—Hannibal, Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Augustus, and Nero, among others—while expanding the historical aperture to include those overlooked in traditional histories: the women, the slaves and ex-slaves, conspirators, and those on the losing side of Rome’s glorious conquests. Like the best detectives, Beard sifts fact from fiction, myth and propaganda from historical record, refusing either simple admiration or blanket condemnation. Far from being frozen in marble, Roman history, she shows, is constantly being revised and rewritten as our knowledge expands. Indeed, our perceptions of ancient Rome have changed dramatically over the last fifty years, and S.P.Q.R., with its nuanced attention to class inequality, democratic struggles, and the lives of entire groups of people omitted from the historical narrative for centuries, promises to shape our view of Roman history for decades to come.

Constantine and Eusebius

Author: Timothy David Barnes

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674165311

Category: History

Page: 458

View: 9686

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Here is the fullest available narrative history of the reigns of Diocletian and Constantine, and a new assessment of the part Christianity played in the Roman world of the third and fourth centuries.

A History of the Ancient World

Author: Chester G. Starr

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195066289

Category: History

Page: 742

View: 2212

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Traces the origins of civilization from prehistoric times to the fall of the Roman Empire and discusses early culture, government, agriculture, religion, and trade

The Cults of the Roman Empire

Author: Robert Turcan

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631200475

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 9441

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This book is about the multiplicity of gods and religions that characterized the Roman world before Constantine. It was not the noble gods such as Jove, Apollo and Diana, who were crucial to the lives of the common people in the empire, bur gods of an altogether more earthly, earth level, whose rituals and observances may now seem bizarre. As well as being of wide general interest, this book will appeal to students of the Roman Empire and of the history of religion.

The Darkening Age

The Christian Destruction of the Classical World

Author: Catherine Nixey

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544800931

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 2134

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A bold new history of the rise of Christianity, showing how its radical followers ravaged vast swathes of classical culture, plunging the world into an era of dogma and intellectual darkness “Searingly passionate…Nixey writes up a storm. Each sentence is rich, textured, evocative, felt…[A] ballista-bolt of a book.” —New York Times Book Review In Harran, the locals refused to convert. They were dismembered, their limbs hung along the town’s main street. In Alexandria, zealots pulled the elderly philosopher-mathematician Hypatia from her chariot and flayed her to death with shards of broken pottery. Not long before, their fellow Christians had invaded the city’s greatest temple and razed it—smashing its world-famous statues and destroying all that was left of Alexandria’s Great Library. Today, we refer to Christianity’s conquest of the West as a “triumph.” But this victory entailed an orgy of destruction in which Jesus’s followers attacked and suppressed classical culture, helping to pitch Western civilization into a thousand-year-long decline. Just one percent of Latin literature would survive the purge; countless antiquities, artworks, and ancient traditions were lost forever. As Catherine Nixey reveals, evidence of early Christians’ campaign of terror has been hiding in plain sight: in the palimpsests and shattered statues proudly displayed in churches and museums the world over. In The Darkening Age, Nixey resurrects this lost history, offering a wrenching account of the rise of Christianity and its terrible cost.

Pagans

The End of Traditional Religion and the Rise of Christianity

Author: James J. O'Donnell

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062370715

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4678

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A provocative and contrarian religious history that charts the rise of Christianity from the point of view of traditional” religion from the religious scholar and critically acclaimed author of Augustine. Pagans explores the rise of Christianity from a surprising and unique viewpoint: that of the people who witnessed their ways of life destroyed by what seemed then a powerful religious cult. These “pagans” were actually pious Greeks, Romans, Syrians, and Gauls who observed the traditions of their ancestors. To these devout polytheists, Christians who worshipped only one deity were immoral atheists who believed that a splash of water on the deathbed could erase a lifetime of sin. Religious scholar James J. O’Donnell takes us on a lively tour of the Ancient Roman world through the fourth century CE, when Romans of every nationality, social class, and religious preference found their world suddenly constrained by rulers who preferred a strange new god. Some joined this new cult, while others denied its power, erroneously believing it was little more than a passing fad. In Pagans, O’Donnell brings to life various pagan rites and essential features of Roman religion and life, offers fresh portraits of iconic historical figures, including Constantine, Julian, and Augustine, and explores important themes—Rome versus the east, civilization versus barbarism, plurality versus unity, rich versus poor, and tradition versus innovation—in this startling account.